Optics & Waves

A:

The speed of light in water is approximately 225,000 km per second. While enormously fast, this is notably slower than the speed of light in a vacuum, which is 300,000 km per second.

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  • How Does Amplitude Affect the Loudness of a Sound?

    Q: How Does Amplitude Affect the Loudness of a Sound?

    A: Amplitude affects the loudness of sound by using vibration to make the sound larger or smaller than it is in actuality. Amplitude is a factor which directly impacts the sound.
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  • What Is the Speed of Light in Water?

    Q: What Is the Speed of Light in Water?

    A: The speed of light in water is approximately 225,000 km per second. While enormously fast, this is notably slower than the speed of light in a vacuum, which is 300,000 km per second.
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  • Why Are Sound Waves Classified As Mechanical?

    Q: Why Are Sound Waves Classified As Mechanical?

    A: Sound is classified as a mechanical wave because it requires a medium to propagate its energy and cannot be heard in vacuum. There are two broad classes of waves - mechanical and electromagnetic. One requires a medium to be heard, and the other does not.
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  • How Does Sound Travel Through a Medium?

    Q: How Does Sound Travel Through a Medium?

    A: Sound travels as a back-and-forth vibration of the particles of its medium. It is a longitudinal mechanical pressure wave that varies greatly in its speed of travel and the distance it remains coherent, dependent upon the medium. Sound in air travels relatively slowly and for a short distance, while sound in a solid, such as the primary waves of an earthquake, travel extremely quickly and to great distances.
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  • How Do We See Light?

    Q: How Do We See Light?

    A: The human eye sees light with the pupil and the retina. Located inside the retina are two types of special cells called photoreceptor cells. There are two varieties of photoreceptor cells known as cones and rods.
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  • Why Do People Need Sound?

    Q: Why Do People Need Sound?

    A: The ability to perceive sound is critical for the survival of most species on Earth, including humans. The ability to assess the environment through hearing evolved in a variety of ways in the animal kingdom, and high-functioning animals such as humans adapted the sense of sound as a means to communicate.
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  • How Do X-Rays Work?

    Q: How Do X-Rays Work?

    A: X-rays work by passing electromagnetic radiation through the body to create an image on film or on a digital device, thus providing diagnostic imaging. They are a part of the electromagnetic spectrum that includes visible light, ultraviolet light and infrared red heat. X-rays are shorter in wavelength than visible light and heat.
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  • What Happens to Wavelength As Frequency Increases?

    Q: What Happens to Wavelength As Frequency Increases?

    A: As frequency increases, wavelength decreases. Frequency and wavelength are inversely proportional. This basically means that when the wavelength is increased, the frequency decreases and vice versa.
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  • What Are the Characteristics of Sound Waves?

    Q: What Are the Characteristics of Sound Waves?

    A: The most basic characteristics of a sound wave are pitch, loudness and tone. A sound wave's frequency is experienced as the wave's pitch. The amplitude determines loudness or volume. The tone of a sound wave can be recognized by the regularity of its vibration.
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  • Why Are Rainbows Curved?

    Q: Why Are Rainbows Curved?

    A: Rainbows appear curved because sunlight shines into raindrops. The sunlight then leaves the raindrop at a different angle than when it first entered, resulting in a curved shape.
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  • What Is the Definition of Resonant Frequency?

    Q: What Is the Definition of Resonant Frequency?

    A: Resonance frequencies are the natural frequencies at which it is easiest to get an object to vibrate. While setting up vibrations at other frequencies is possible, they require much more energy and constant input to maintain than a resonance frequency. Most objects have several resonance frequencies, and this property must be taken into account because of their positive, as with musical instruments, or negative, as with bridges, effects.
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  • How Does an Echo Occur?

    Q: How Does an Echo Occur?

    A: An echo occurs when a sound wave reflects back towards its source after hitting a hard surface. Although the surface may absorb some of the sound, the remaining sound that is not absorbed continues moving, creating additional echoes by bouncing off surrounding objects until the sound is completely absorbed or dissipates.
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  • Why Are Sunsets Red?

    Q: Why Are Sunsets Red?

    A: According to the Old Dominion University, sunsets get their red color because light is refracted by particles that are in the atmosphere and the red spectrum is the one that is visible. The sky can also have shades of orange, yellow and purple when the sun begins to set.
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  • What Are Examples of Diffraction?

    Q: What Are Examples of Diffraction?

    A: A common example of diffraction of light is looking at an object that is partially immersed in water, where the object appears to be in a different place. Sound diffraction is usually not visible, but it is audible through walls or other solid objects.
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  • Can Sound Travel Through Water?

    Q: Can Sound Travel Through Water?

    A: Although sound can travel through water, it will be distorted compared to sound traveling through air. As sound waves pass through the water, they are attenuated and slowed, leading to frequency warping and decreases in amplitude.
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  • What Are the Dangers of Infrared Waves?

    Q: What Are the Dangers of Infrared Waves?

    A: Infrared waves are dangerous because they can cause burns, skin irritation, dehydration, low blood pressure and eye damage. A form of heat radiation, infrared waves are most dangerous at high levels.
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  • What Is Infrared Used For?

    Q: What Is Infrared Used For?

    A: Infrared is used for keeping things warm, reading information and checking heat. The uses for infrared technology are so diverse because infrared not only detects heat but produces heat in objects that it strikes.
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  • What Does the Acronym LASER Stand For?

    Q: What Does the Acronym LASER Stand For?

    A: LASER is the abbreviation (or acronym) of "light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation," according to Curiosity.com. The foundation work for lasers was set in motion by Albert Einstein in 1917, according to Wikipedia.
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  • How Did Sir Isaac Newton Discover Optics?

    Q: How Did Sir Isaac Newton Discover Optics?

    A: In 1666, Sir Isaac Newton discovered optics while examining a lighted refracted from a crystal prism and observing that light consisted of a full spectrum of color. In 1704, he published a book detailing his findings titled "Opticks."
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  • What Are the Physics of a Megaphone?

    Q: What Are the Physics of a Megaphone?

    A: A megaphone directs or funnels the voice to a specific direction, and it also regulates the distribution of sound waves from the mouth to the open medium. The secret behind the workings of a megaphone is in its shape.
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  • How Fast Is Supersonic Speed?

    Q: How Fast Is Supersonic Speed?

    A: Supersonic speed is faster than the speed of sound, which is 768 miles per hour at sea level. Some familiar objects capable of traveling that quickly are bullets, whips and jet planes.
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