Optics & Waves

A:

When light passes through glass, the photons in the light interact with the electrons in the glass. However, photons in visible light don't have enough energy in them to change the state of electrons in glass, so the light just passes through the glass.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • How Are Sounds Made?

    Q: How Are Sounds Made?

    A: Sounds travel through waves, and these waves are made by vibrating an object, whether vocal cords or drums, according to the University of Rhode Island. Moving the object in one direction compresses the air in front of it. The pressure differences in the air move away from the object, creating sound waves.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Does Chromatic Adaptation Work?

    Q: How Does Chromatic Adaptation Work?

    A: Chromatic adaptation enables the human eye to adapt to various forms of light. According to Images And Visual Representation Group, chromatic adaptation causes the eyes to ignore the color of the surrounding light, enabling them to retain the color and appearance of the original object even after looking at something else.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Is Sound Louder in Water?

    Q: Is Sound Louder in Water?

    A: Sound is louder in water than in air. Sound travels as waves that bounce off objects. Sound waves travel five times faster in water than in air, and they travel farther.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Is It Possible to Become Invisible?

    Q: Is It Possible to Become Invisible?

    A: Though there is some research and experimentation on the subject, there is not, as of 2014, a viable way to become completely invisible. Objects and people are visible because light reflects off them and hits the viewer's eye.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Can Sound Waves Be Reflected?

    Q: Can Sound Waves Be Reflected?

    A: Sound waves can be reflected. They most often reflect when they hit an obstacle in their path, such as a hard wall. Some sound waves will be reflected when the sound transitions from traveling through one medium to another, such as going from air to water.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is a Sonic Boom?

    Q: What Is a Sonic Boom?

    A: A sonic boom as an impulsive wave similar to thunder caused by an object exceeding the speed of sound, according to Sky-flash.com. The speed of sound is approximately 750 mph at sea level.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • When Does the Calvin Cycle of Photosynthesis Begin?

    Q: When Does the Calvin Cycle of Photosynthesis Begin?

    A: The Calvin cycle of photosynthesis begins after light energy is transformed into chemical energy by the cells of plants. The adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, molecules created power the Calvin cycle. The Calvin cycle uses the energy to create carbohydrates from water and carbon dioxide.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Did Wilhelm Roentgen Invent?

    Q: What Did Wilhelm Roentgen Invent?

    A: Wilhelm Roentgen invented the use of cathode rays to take X-rays of the body in 1895, according to About.com. Roentgen was honored for his discovery by receiving the Nobel Prize in physics in 1901.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is Infrared Used For?

    Q: What Is Infrared Used For?

    A: Infrared is used for keeping things warm, reading information and checking heat. The uses for infrared technology are so diverse because infrared not only detects heat but produces heat in objects that it strikes.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Does Amplitude Affect the Loudness of a Sound?

    Q: How Does Amplitude Affect the Loudness of a Sound?

    A: Amplitude affects the loudness of sound by using vibration to make the sound larger or smaller than it is in actuality. Amplitude is a factor which directly impacts the sound.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do Sound Waves Travel?

    Q: How Do Sound Waves Travel?

    A: How Stuff Works explains that sound travels in mechanical waves, and these waves are disturbances that cause energy to move. The energy is then transported through a medium. Disturbances occur when an object vibrates. This vibration is caused by interconnected and interactive particles.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why Are Lasers Red?

    Q: Why Are Lasers Red?

    A: Lasers are mostly red in color because red has the longest wavelength, approximately 650 nanometers. Because of this, red does not scatter easily and can be viewed from a long distance.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Are the Physics of a Megaphone?

    Q: What Are the Physics of a Megaphone?

    A: A megaphone directs or funnels the voice to a specific direction, and it also regulates the distribution of sound waves from the mouth to the open medium. The secret behind the workings of a megaphone is in its shape.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Many Isotopes Does Neon Have?

    Q: How Many Isotopes Does Neon Have?

    A: More than nineteen isotopes of neon are known; naturally occurring neon, however, consists of a mixture of the three most stable isotopes. The other isotopes are not common because they are unstable.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Frequency Range of Radio Waves?

    Q: What Is the Frequency Range of Radio Waves?

    A: Radio waves range from 300 gigahertz (GHz), or a wavelength of 1 millimeter, to 3 kilohertz (kHz), which corresponds to a wavelength of 100 kilometers. Radio waves are the lowest frequency within the electromagnetic spectrum. The wavelength is the distance from the peak of one wave to the next.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Does a Bell Make Sound?

    Q: How Does a Bell Make Sound?

    A: As the clapper of the bell strikes its sides, it causes them to vibrate, setting up a disturbance in the equilibrium of the air surrounding the bell. This disturbance travels through the air in a wave form that humans know as sound.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why Do Lights Appear to Flicker From a Distance?

    Q: Why Do Lights Appear to Flicker From a Distance?

    A: The flickering or twinkling effect of lights when observed from a distance is caused by anomalous refraction as light passes through air, schlieren, where temperatures and densities vary. The technical term for this phenomenon is called "scintillation," and it refers to the rapid changes in the position and color of a distant object.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Highest Frequency a Human Can Hear?

    Q: What Is the Highest Frequency a Human Can Hear?

    A: Humans can generally hear frequencies from 20 to 20,000 hertz. However, under ideal laboratory conditions, humans have been able to hear frequencies as low as 12 hertz. As humans get older or are exposed to loud sounds that damage their hearing, the highest frequency they can hear decreases.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why Does Refraction Happen?

    Q: Why Does Refraction Happen?

    A: Refraction is the bending of a beam of light when it enters a medium of different density. Light travels fastest in vacuum and in air. When light enters a medium of higher density, such as water, its velocity changes and causes it to bend or refract.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why Do People Need Sound?

    Q: Why Do People Need Sound?

    A: The ability to perceive sound is critical for the survival of most species on Earth, including humans. The ability to assess the environment through hearing evolved in a variety of ways in the animal kingdom, and high-functioning animals such as humans adapted the sense of sound as a means to communicate.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do Waves Carry Energy From One Place to Another?

    Q: How Do Waves Carry Energy From One Place to Another?

    A: Energy is transferred in electromagnetic waves by vibrations in electric and magnetic fields. The vibration of air particles is energy transfer in sound waves, while the transfer of energy in water waves is the oscillation of water particles.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: