Motion & Mechanics

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Water displacement is a particular case of fluid displacement, which is simply the principle that any object placed in a fluid causes that fluid to no longer occupy that volume of space. The fluid must go somewhere, however, and so with liquids in containers, this causes their overall height to rise. Gases are also fluids subject to displacement, and they both fill space and are compressible, so an object introduced to a sealed container full of a gas simply decreases the volume of the gas and increases its pressure.

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  • What Is the Archimedes Principle?

    Q: What Is the Archimedes Principle?

    A: The Archimedes Principle (called the law of buoyancy), states any vessel partially or totally submerged in a fluid has an upward force acting upon it that is equal in magnitude to the weight of the fluid displaced by the vessel. The volume of the displaced fluid also equals the volume of the submerged portion of the vessel.
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  • What Is Gravitational Energy?

    Q: What Is Gravitational Energy?

    A: Gravitational energy is the movement of an object or mass that is caused by the pull of gravity. This is caused on Earth by the strong attraction of all other masses to be drawn back to Earth's center. An example of gravitational energy is water from a river tumbling over a cliff to form a waterfall.
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  • What Are Pulleys Used For?

    Q: What Are Pulleys Used For?

    A: A pulley is a simple tool that can be used for many things, such as lifting heavy objects or to change the direction of applied forces for various means. A pulley is a very simple tool that consists of a wheel on a fixed axle that has grooves for keeping a rope or wire in place. This makes pulleys useful for lifting heavy objects using applied human force.
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  • What Is Simple Harmonic Motion?

    Q: What Is Simple Harmonic Motion?

    A: In physics, simple harmonic motion refers to repetitive oscillation back and forth through a central or equilibrium position. A pendulum is a good example of a physical system that exhibits simple harmonic motion. The time taken to complete one full oscillation is called a time period.
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  • What Is the Conclusion of Projectile Motion?

    Q: What Is the Conclusion of Projectile Motion?

    A: Projectile motion is concluded when a projectile stops moving. Assuming nothing gets in the way, that conclusion is reached when the projectile comes to rest on the ground.
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  • How Is Wind Energy Used Today?

    Q: How Is Wind Energy Used Today?

    A: Wind energy is mainly used to generate electricity. The main instrument used to capture this energy is the wind turbine, which is comprised of three or four rotating blades connected to a drive shaft. Wind flows over the blades of the wind turbine, causing them to turn. This kinetic energy from turning is converted to electrical energy for transmission to homes and businesses.
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  • What Kind of Simple Machine Is a Pair of Scissors?

    Q: What Kind of Simple Machine Is a Pair of Scissors?

    A: A pair of scissors is two levers put together. With this simple machine, less force is needed because a greater distance is involved. Other types of levers include a see-saw, a hammer, a fork and a baseball bat.
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  • How Do Bullet Trains Work?

    Q: How Do Bullet Trains Work?

    A: Bullet trains, also called maglev trains, operate with magnetic levitation technology developed by Japanese and German engineers. Japanese engineers refer to their method as electrodynamic suspension while German engineers refer to their method as electromagnetic suspension. Either way, magnets raise the trains above the track, which means there is no need for wheels.
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  • Does Length Affect the Period of a Pendulum?

    Q: Does Length Affect the Period of a Pendulum?

    A: The length of the pendulum is directly correlated to its period as per the pendulum equation: T = 2π√(L/g), where T is the period of the pendulum, L is its length, and g is the gravitational constant 9.8 m/s2. Regardless of the weight of the pendulum bob, otherwise known as the weight at the end of the string, the deciding factor of the period of the swing is length, as it is the only variable in the stated equation.
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  • How Does a Petrol Engine Work?

    Q: How Does a Petrol Engine Work?

    A: Petrol engines harness the energy created by petrol in the core of a car engine to propel the vehicle. Petrol is a high-energy fuel that releases large amounts of energy when ignited in an internal combustion engine.
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  • What Are the Different Types of Force?

    Q: What Are the Different Types of Force?

    A: Forces are broadly classified into two categories: contact forces, which are required to make contact with the object in order for them to work, and action-at-a-distance forces, which can act on objects placed at a distance. Contact forces include applied force, frictional force, normal force, spring force, tension force and air resistance. Action-at-a-distance forces include gravitational force, magnetic force and electrical force.
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  • What Is the Function of a Mortar and Pestle?

    Q: What Is the Function of a Mortar and Pestle?

    A: A mortar and pestle is used to grind fresh herbs and spices. These freshly ground herbs and spices can be used in cooking or in home health remedies.
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  • Why Do Ships Float on Water?

    Q: Why Do Ships Float on Water?

    A: Ships float because they displace enough water for the buoyancy force to be greater than the force of gravity acting on the ship. The displaced water attempts to return to its original position, now occupied by the ship, which pushes the ship up. This effect is known as buoyancy force. The strength of the force of gravity pulling down on the ship is affected by its weight. Whichever of these forces is stronger determines if the ship floats or sinks.
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  • What Is an Example of Elastic Force?

    Q: What Is an Example of Elastic Force?

    A: An example of elastic force is bungee jumping. The elastic cord creates resistance and imposes a force when the cord is stretched far enough. That elasticity creates the bouncing motion a bungee jumper feels after the initial jump, while the cord works to return to its normal size.
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  • What Is Potential Energy?

    Q: What Is Potential Energy?

    A: Potential energy is defined as the energy possessed by a body due to its position or height above the surface of the Earth. Water stored in a dam has potential energy. This potential energy has the capacity to do work.
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  • What Are Radio Waves Used For?

    Q: What Are Radio Waves Used For?

    A: Radio waves are used to receive and transmit signals between two objects. These waves help to transfer signals from broadcasting stations to televisions and radios, and they are also used to transmit signals for cellular phones.
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  • How Does Gravity Affect Weight?

    Q: How Does Gravity Affect Weight?

    A: Gravity affects weight because gravity creates weight. Objects have mass, which is defined as how much matter an object contains. Weight is defined as the pull of gravity on mass.
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  • How Does Mass Affect Speed?

    Q: How Does Mass Affect Speed?

    A: Mass does not affect speed directly, but it does affect how fast an object can change its speed by accelerating or decelerating. Objects with larger masses require more time for acceleration or deceleration compared to lighter objects.
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  • What Is a Non-Newtonian Fluid?

    Q: What Is a Non-Newtonian Fluid?

    A: Non-Newtonian fluids are those that behave differently than Newtonian fluids do with regard to viscosity. Typically, stress causes non-Newtonian fluids to alter their flow patterns or viscosity. The stress can cause the viscosity to increase or decrease, depending on the particular non-Newtonian fluid.
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  • What Are the Main Branches of Mechanics?

    Q: What Are the Main Branches of Mechanics?

    A: The two main branches of mechanics are statics and dynamics. Static mechanics is the study of forces which are required to keep a body in equilibrium. Dynamics is the study of motion itself, and the forces producing it.
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  • How Do Levers Work?

    Q: How Do Levers Work?

    A: HowStuffWorks explains that levers work by reducing the force needed to move weights. They achieve this by increasing the distance through which the required force acts. For instance, a 1-kilogram force that acts through a distance of 3 meters is capable of moving a 3-kilogram weight in 1 meter, if friction is ignored.
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