Motion & Mechanics

A:

Air is a fluid because the force needed to deform it depends on how fast it is deformed, not on how much it is deformed. This differs from a solid, where the force needed to deform it remains the same whether it is done quickly or slowly.

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  • Why can't liquids be compressed?

    Q: Why can't liquids be compressed?

    A: Liquid compression is difficult but not impossible because they feature a mid-level intermolecular force that makes their molecules difficult to compress. Intermolecular force is the strength used to hold molecules tightly together or force them apart. The strength of the intermolecular force depends on the state of the matter, with solids having the strongest intermolecular force and gases having the weakest intermolecular force.
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  • What is the difference between absolute and relative location?

    Q: What is the difference between absolute and relative location?

    A: Absolute location is a place's exact spot on a map, while relative location is an estimate of where a place is in relation to other landmarks. Absolute location is defined by latitude and longitude measurements. Relative location is used in conversational language and for giving rough directions.
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  • How do levers work?

    Q: How do levers work?

    A: HowStuffWorks explains that levers work by reducing the force needed to move weights. They achieve this by increasing the distance through which the required force acts. For instance, a 1-kilogram force that acts through a distance of 3 meters is capable of moving a 3-kilogram weight in 1 meter, if friction is ignored.
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  • What is an example of elastic force?

    Q: What is an example of elastic force?

    A: An example of elastic force is bungee jumping. The elastic cord creates resistance and imposes a force when the cord is stretched far enough. That elasticity creates the bouncing motion a bungee jumper feels after the initial jump, while the cord works to return to its normal size.
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  • What is simple harmonic motion?

    Q: What is simple harmonic motion?

    A: In physics, simple harmonic motion refers to repetitive oscillation back and forth through a central or equilibrium position. A pendulum is a good example of a physical system that exhibits simple harmonic motion. The time taken to complete one full oscillation is called a time period.
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  • What kind of friction occurs as a fish swims through water?

    Q: What kind of friction occurs as a fish swims through water?

    A: When a fish swims through water, it experiences drag caused by fluid friction. To swim successfully, a fish must use its strength to overcome resistance caused by friction. In clear waters, the water is quite thin, making swimming easier, but in murky waters, fish experience more friction, making swimming difficult.
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  • What is water displacement?

    Q: What is water displacement?

    A: Water displacement is a particular case of fluid displacement, which is simply the principle that any object placed in a fluid causes that fluid to no longer occupy that volume of space. The fluid must go somewhere, however, and so with liquids in containers, this causes their overall height to rise. Gases are also fluids subject to displacement, and they both fill space and are compressible, so an object introduced to a sealed container full of a gas simply decreases the volume of the gas and increases its pressure.
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  • When is friction unwanted?

    Q: When is friction unwanted?

    A: Friction is unwanted in any situation in which free and continuous motion of mechanical parts is necessary. Some examples include the moving parts inside of an engine, door hinges and water slides.
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  • How can friction be reduced?

    Q: How can friction be reduced?

    A: Friction can be reduced by adding a lubricant or by smoothing and polishing surfaces, according to the HyperPhysics program at Georgia State University. For some substances, smoothing only reduces friction to a point, after which friction increases with further smoothing.
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  • How does convection work?

    Q: How does convection work?

    A: Convection works by transferring heat from a hot substance to a cooler one through the motion of one of the substances. For example, as wind passes over a hot substance, heat from the substance transfers to the air particles, cooling the hot substance and slightly warming the air.
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  • Why does cork float on water?

    Q: Why does cork float on water?

    A: Corks float on water because it contains a lot of air making it less dense than water. Solids and liquids with less density float on denser liquids.
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  • How does a petrol engine work?

    Q: How does a petrol engine work?

    A: Petrol engines harness the energy created by petrol in the core of a car engine to propel the vehicle. Petrol is a high-energy fuel that releases large amounts of energy when ignited in an internal combustion engine.
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  • What are some achievements of Isaac Newton?

    Q: What are some achievements of Isaac Newton?

    A: Some of Sir Isaac Newton's achievements include defining the law of gravity and the three laws of motion, inventing the reflecting telescope, defining theories of light and color and inventing calculus. Newton was a philosopher, mathematician and physicist who played an important role in the scientific Revolution of the 17th century.
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  • How do you calculate net force?

    Q: How do you calculate net force?

    A: To calculate the net force, or unbalanced force, of a Newtonian object, find the sum of all forces presently acting upon it. These include gravity, friction and other forces depending on the scenario. You need only a few figures and computations to calculate an object's net force, which is required for acceleration and is expressed in Newtons.
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  • What are the main branches of mechanics?

    Q: What are the main branches of mechanics?

    A: The two main branches of mechanics are statics and dynamics. Static mechanics is the study of forces which are required to keep a body in equilibrium. Dynamics is the study of motion itself, and the forces producing it.
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  • How do bullet trains work?

    Q: How do bullet trains work?

    A: Bullet trains, also called maglev trains, operate with magnetic levitation technology developed by Japanese and German engineers. Japanese engineers refer to their method as electrodynamic suspension while German engineers refer to their method as electromagnetic suspension. Either way, magnets raise the trains above the track, which means there is no need for wheels.
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  • What does momentum mean?

    Q: What does momentum mean?

    A: In physics, "momentum" is a property that describes an object's motion. Linear momentum, the momentum of an object moving in a straight line, is the mass of the object multiplied by its velocity.
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  • How do water rockets work?

    Q: How do water rockets work?

    A: A water rocket works because of air pressure that is builds inside a container filled with water, usually a plastic soda bottle, which is released rapidly through an opening as it tries to escape. The reaction of a water rocket is an excellent example of Newton���s third law of motion, which states that forces exist in pairs.
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  • What is the law of inertia?

    Q: What is the law of inertia?

    A: The law of inertia states that an object at rest stays at rest and an object in motion stays in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force. The law of inertia is sometimes referred to as Newton's first law of motion.
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  • Why is rolling friction much less forceful than sliding friction?

    Q: Why is rolling friction much less forceful than sliding friction?

    A: When an object slides across the ground, it has much more surface area in direct contact with the ground, which means that the amount of friction is significantly higher. When an object rolls along the ground, only a minuscule point on the object contacts the ground at any point in time, making the stopping force much weaker.
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  • How does a petrol pump work?

    Q: How does a petrol pump work?

    A: A petrol pump works by using a diaphragm that pressurizes gasoline, according to Second Chance Garage. The gas transfers from the pump and through fuel line, until it reaches the carburetor.
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