Motion & Mechanics

A:

The law of acceleration is formally referred to as Newton's Second Law of Motion and defines the rate of acceleration as a product of the force exerted on the object and the mass of the object. The rate of acceleration increases as the net force increases. The inverse is true for mass, with the acceleration decreasing as the mass increases.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • What Class Lever Is a Stapler?

    Q: What Class Lever Is a Stapler?

    A: A stapler is an example of a second class lever. Levers are designated as second class if the load is situated between the fulcrum, or pivoting point, and the point where effort, or force, is applied.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Law of Acceleration?

    Q: What Is the Law of Acceleration?

    A: The law of acceleration is formally referred to as Newton's Second Law of Motion and defines the rate of acceleration as a product of the force exerted on the object and the mass of the object. The rate of acceleration increases as the net force increases. The inverse is true for mass, with the acceleration decreasing as the mass increases.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why Can't Liquids Be Compressed?

    Q: Why Can't Liquids Be Compressed?

    A: Liquid compression is difficult but not impossible because they feature a mid-level intermolecular force that makes their molecules difficult to compress. Intermolecular force is the strength used to hold molecules tightly together or force them apart. The strength of the intermolecular force depends on the state of the matter, with solids having the strongest intermolecular force and gases having the weakest intermolecular force.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Does a Petrol Pump Work?

    Q: How Does a Petrol Pump Work?

    A: A petrol pump works by using a diaphragm that pressurizes gasoline, according to Second Chance Garage. The gas transfers from the pump and through fuel line, until it reaches the carburetor.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Is Acceleration Measured?

    Q: How Is Acceleration Measured?

    A: Acceleration is measured by using an accelerometer, an electromechanical device that measures acceleration forces. Dimension Engineering explains that these forces can be static, such as those caused by gravity, or dynamic, as in those that cause motion.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Are Complex Machines?

    Q: What Are Complex Machines?

    A: A complex machine is a combination of two or more simple machines. A simple machine is one of the six basic devices that make work easier by changing the degree or direction of a force.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Difference Between Absolute and Relative Location?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Absolute and Relative Location?

    A: Absolute location is a place's exact spot on a map, while relative location is an estimate of where a place is in relation to other landmarks. Absolute location is defined by latitude and longitude measurements. Relative location is used in conversational language and for giving rough directions.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is an Inclined Plane?

    Q: What Is an Inclined Plane?

    A: An inclined plane is, essentially, a ramp. Inclined planes are useful for a wide range of physics experiments, and they can demonstrate basic physics principles about gravity and angular motion.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Does Gravity Affect Weight?

    Q: How Does Gravity Affect Weight?

    A: Gravity affects weight because gravity creates weight. Objects have mass, which is defined as how much matter an object contains. Weight is defined as the pull of gravity on mass.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is a First-Class Lever?

    Q: What Is a First-Class Lever?

    A: A first-class lever is a beam, rod or stick with the load at one end, the fulcrum in the middle and the force applied on the other end. A good example of a first-class lever is a child's see-saw.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Does a Water Turbine Work?

    Q: How Does a Water Turbine Work?

    A: Water turbines convert the motion of moving water into rotating mechanical energy by catching the water with large blades. They are important to the structure and function of hydropower plants. There are different models of water turbines, but all perform the same basic function of converting the energy of the moving water into the revolutions of a shaft.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Does a Petrol Engine Work?

    Q: How Does a Petrol Engine Work?

    A: Petrol engines harness the energy created by petrol in the core of a car engine to propel the vehicle. Petrol is a high-energy fuel that releases large amounts of energy when ignited in an internal combustion engine.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Far Will Bullets Travel?

    Q: How Far Will Bullets Travel?

    A: The distance a bullet travels is entirely dependent on the gun from which it is fired. The muzzle velocity and maximum range of a specific weapon both need to be taken into account in order to calculate how far a bullet travels after being fired.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do Bullet Trains Work?

    Q: How Do Bullet Trains Work?

    A: Bullet trains, also called maglev trains, operate with magnetic levitation technology developed by Japanese and German engineers. Japanese engineers refer to their method as electrodynamic suspension while German engineers refer to their method as electromagnetic suspension. Either way, magnets raise the trains above the track, which means there is no need for wheels.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Are Some Achievements of Isaac Newton?

    Q: What Are Some Achievements of Isaac Newton?

    A: Some of Sir Isaac Newton's achievements include defining the law of gravity and the three laws of motion, inventing the reflecting telescope, defining theories of light and color and inventing calculus. Newton was a philosopher, mathematician and physicist who played an important role in the scientific Revolution of the 17th century.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why Is Rolling Friction Much Less Forceful Than Sliding Friction?

    Q: Why Is Rolling Friction Much Less Forceful Than Sliding Friction?

    A: When an object slides across the ground, it has much more surface area in direct contact with the ground, which means that the amount of friction is significantly higher. When an object rolls along the ground, only a minuscule point on the object contacts the ground at any point in time, making the stopping force much weaker.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Difference Between Laminar and Turbulent Flow?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Laminar and Turbulent Flow?

    A: Laminar and turbulent flows are the two major forms of fluid flow, with laminar flow being an orderly flow with all the fluid molecules moving parallel in the direction of flow, whereas in turbulent flow, different streams of fluid form eddies and unpredictable currents in a different direction than the overall direction of flow. Which type of flow arises in a fluid depends on its speed relative to its viscosity and the size and shape of the pipe or other channel carrying the fluid. Viscosity is the resistance to flow, and more inherently viscous fluids are more resistant to turbulence.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Does Sound Travel?

    Q: How Does Sound Travel?

    A: Sound travels in waves from a transmitter to a receiver through a medium. The wave is produced by the vibration of particles in mediums such as gases, liquids and solids. Because sound requires a medium of interconnected and interactive particles, it cannot travel in a vacuum such as space.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Does Length Affect the Period of a Pendulum?

    Q: Does Length Affect the Period of a Pendulum?

    A: The length of the pendulum is directly correlated to its period as per the pendulum equation: T = 2π√(L/g), where T is the period of the pendulum, L is its length, and g is the gravitational constant 9.8 m/s2. Regardless of the weight of the pendulum bob, otherwise known as the weight at the end of the string, the deciding factor of the period of the swing is length, as it is the only variable in the stated equation.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Conclusion of Projectile Motion?

    Q: What Is the Conclusion of Projectile Motion?

    A: Projectile motion is concluded when a projectile stops moving. Assuming nothing gets in the way, that conclusion is reached when the projectile comes to rest on the ground.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is Potential Energy?

    Q: What Is Potential Energy?

    A: Potential energy is defined as the energy possessed by a body due to its position or height above the surface of the Earth. Water stored in a dam has potential energy. This potential energy has the capacity to do work.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: