Landforms

A:

The Snowy Mountains in the Australian Alps started forming about 860 million years ago by different marine sediments when southeast Australia was covered by the sea, according to Swirk. Natural forces up folded and lifted these rocks, then were later flattened by erosion leaving the sharp edge plateaux seen today. The valleys were formed by river water erosion.

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  • How do parabolic dunes form?

    Q: How do parabolic dunes form?

    A: As with all dunes, parabolic dunes are primarily shaped by the wind. Parabolic dunes tend to proliferate in places where wind blows predominantly in one direction and the movement of sand is restrained by vegetation.
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  • What is an example of a raised flat area?

    Q: What is an example of a raised flat area?

    A: An example of a raised flat area is a plateau. A plateau is a large flat region of land higher than the other areas of land surrounding it.
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  • How are islands formed?

    Q: How are islands formed?

    A: Islands form in several ways. The most common events that lead to island formation are volcanic activity and continental drift. Islands also form due to erosion, buildup of sediment and coral that grows enough to penetrate the surface of the water.
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  • What are examples of peninsulas?

    Q: What are examples of peninsulas?

    A: Peninsulas are found all around the world; in the United States, two prominent examples are the Upper Peninsula in Michigan and the Delmarva Peninsula in Maryland. Peninsulas are chunks of land that are surrounded on three sides by water and joined to larger bodies of land by a neck, called an isthmus. Peninsulas occur primarily along ocean coastlines, although they appear along large river borders too.
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  • What is a plateau?

    Q: What is a plateau?

    A: A plateau refers either to a piece of land that is level and located above nearby land, or the term can refer to a situation that is relatively unchanged for a period of time. In the case of an unchanged situation, the word has either a negative or a positive connotation, depending on whether change is advantageous.
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  • What is a ring-shaped coral island called?

    Q: What is a ring-shaped coral island called?

    A: A ring-shaped coral island is called an atoll. According to Encyclopedia Britannica, an atoll is made up of sections of coral reef that form a closed shape around a central lagoon.
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  • What is a billabong?

    Q: What is a billabong?

    A: A billabong is essentially a large pond or creek that at one time extended from a river. A billabong is the cut off extension of a river that changed its course over time. During a wet season, the billabong often connects back with the river, receiving fresh water, at least until the area dries back up.
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  • What are the Appalachian Highlands?

    Q: What are the Appalachian Highlands?

    A: The Appalachian Highlands are a mountain range in Eastern North America. They run from Canada to regions of Georgia and through Alabama.
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  • What is the bottom of the ocean called?

    Q: What is the bottom of the ocean called?

    A: The bottom of the ocean is known as the hadalpelagic zone and extends from 19,686 feet to the bottom of the ocean floor. This area is found in canyons and deep-water trenches, and the deepest part is found in the Marianas trench.
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  • What makes a continent?

    Q: What makes a continent?

    A: A continent is a large land mass on Earth that is distinguished by a separation from other land by water or by a distinct cultural difference. Earth has a total of seven continents: North America, South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and Antarctica.
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  • What is the world's largest peninsula?

    Q: What is the world's largest peninsula?

    A: The world's largest peninsula is the Arabian Peninsula. The Arabian Peninsula is located in Southwest Asia and contains the countries of Jordan, Iraq, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman, Yemen and Saudi Arabia.
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  • When was the last time Mount Vesuvius erupted?

    Q: When was the last time Mount Vesuvius erupted?

    A: Mount Vesuvius' last eruption was in March of 1944. The eruption destroyed the villages of San Sebastiano al Vesuvio, Massa di Somma, Ottaviano, and part of San Giorgio a Cremano.
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  • How do volcanoes form landforms?

    Q: How do volcanoes form landforms?

    A: Volcanoes form landforms when the lava that flows out of the peak solidifies into rock. Magma is molten rock from the Earth's mantle pushed up by the action of plate tectonics. When the magma flows or explodes out of the top of the volcano, it is called lava. Over geological timescales, this lava keeps piling on top of successive strata of cooled rock, making several different kinds of landforms.
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  • How did oceans form?

    Q: How did oceans form?

    A: Nearly 3.8 billion years ago, temperatures on Earth cooled below 100 degrees Celsius for the first time, allowing water, which existed on the planet in gaseous form, to condense into rain and collect on the planet's surface, according to the American Museum of Natural History. This water collected in low-lying areas, eventually becoming a primitive ocean.
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  • How did the Grand Canyon form?

    Q: How did the Grand Canyon form?

    A: The Grand Canyon was formed primarily by erosion from the constant water flow of the Colorado River. This erosion occurred gradually over the past 5 to 6 million years.
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  • What are the physical features of the arctic lowlands?

    Q: What are the physical features of the arctic lowlands?

    A: The arctic lowlands consist of several barren low-lying islands with coastlines dominated by sheer, towering cliffs and frigid surrounding waters of the Atlantic that contain pieces of massive ice sheets. Together, the lowlands comprise the southwestern Arctic Archipelago. They vary in size and shape: some are small and unpopulated, while others, including Victoria Island, are much larger.
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  • What are some facts about coastal plains?

    Q: What are some facts about coastal plains?

    A: Coastal plains are flat, low-lying pieces of land that feature a body of water on one side and some type of landform on the other. According to National Geographic, a coastal plain can form either as a continental shelf or when water currents carry sedimentary materials that build up over time.
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  • How do landforms affect climate?

    Q: How do landforms affect climate?

    A: Landforms affect climate by altering the wind and rate of evaporation, which can cause changes in the temperature, humidity and precipitation of a region. When storm fronts run into landforms, such as mountains or high plateaus, rain clouds are sometimes blocked. This causes the upwind side of the landform to receive plentiful rainfall, while the downwind side of the structure remains dry.
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  • What are the windward and leeward sides of a mountain?

    Q: What are the windward and leeward sides of a mountain?

    A: The windward side of a mountain faces the wind while the leeward side faces away from the prevailing wind. The climate on different sides of the mountain can vary greatly.
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  • How were the Snowy Mountains formed?

    Q: How were the Snowy Mountains formed?

    A: The Snowy Mountains in the Australian Alps started forming about 860 million years ago by different marine sediments when southeast Australia was covered by the sea, according to Swirk. Natural forces up folded and lifted these rocks, then were later flattened by erosion leaving the sharp edge plateaux seen today. The valleys were formed by river water erosion.
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  • What are the three types of plateaus?

    Q: What are the three types of plateaus?

    A: The three types of plateaus are dissected, volcanic and oceanic plateaus. A plateau is described as a raised landform that extends above the surrounding area on at least one of the plateau's sides. Plateaus are found on every continent and make up 30 percent of the land on Earth.
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