Human Anatomy

A:

The eyes close just before a sneeze due to a reflex action as the eyes and the nose are connected by cranial nerves. The sneeze sends a stimulation that travels to a nerve in the brain and a nerve in the eyelids triggering the eyes to close.

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  • What is a nasal passage?

    Q: What is a nasal passage?

    A: The nasal passage is a channel wherein air flows through the nose. Respiratory mucous membranes with many hair-like cells line the walls of this passage.
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  • What is the capacity of a human stomach?

    Q: What is the capacity of a human stomach?

    A: According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), the human stomach is an elastic organ that can expand to hold from 0.25 to 1.7 L of contents without causing any discomfort. The average human stomach has a capacity of roughly 1 L, or a little more than a quart.
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  • What are six substances transported by blood?

    Q: What are six substances transported by blood?

    A: The blood transports oxygen, carbon dioxide, nutrients, water, hormones, waste substances and heat. The waste substances are moved to the liver and kidneys, which remove toxins from the blood. Urea is moved from the liver to the kidneys.
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  • What happens when too much adrenaline is produced?

    Q: What happens when too much adrenaline is produced?

    A: When the body produces too much adrenaline, a person likely has phaeochromocytoma, a rare tumor of the adrenal medulla, according to the Society for Endocrinology. Symptoms of this condition include high blood pressure, fast heartbeat, palpitations, excessive sweating, weight loss and anxiety.
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  • What happens when your body becomes dehydrated?

    Q: What happens when your body becomes dehydrated?

    A: When the body becomes dehydrated, a variety of symptoms can occur, including weakness, dizziness, decreased urination and heart palpitations, according to WebMD. Dehydration occurs when the body loses more fluids than it takes in. Additional signs of dehydration include increased thirst, swollen tongue and an inability to sweat.
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  • Is the tongue the strongest muscle in your body?

    Q: Is the tongue the strongest muscle in your body?

    A: According to HowStuffWorks, the famous myth that the tongue is the strongest muscle in the body is not true. The tongue is made up of skeletal muscle fibers, allowing its owner to control it voluntarily. It is an essential part of the digestive system in keeping food between the teeth for chewing, the first part of the digestive process. Several other muscles have strength in different capacities that outweigh the strength of tongue.
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  • What is the difference between veins, arteries and capillaries?

    Q: What is the difference between veins, arteries and capillaries?

    A: According to The Franklin Institute, there are three types of blood vessels, each with its own function. Veins carry blood back to the heart, arteries carry blood away from the heart and capillaries connect arteries to veins.
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  • What are two factors that contribute to knee stability?

    Q: What are two factors that contribute to knee stability?

    A: According to the Western Journal of Medicine, the knee is stabilized by the shape of the joint and the ligaments accompanying it. The joint is shaped by the local bone protuberances and the surrounding cartilage. The many ligaments that support the knee joint include the cruciate (cross-shaped) and collateral ligaments.
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  • At what age does your head stop growing?

    Q: At what age does your head stop growing?

    A: Duke Magazine reports that the bones in the head continue to grow throughout a person's lifetime. The cheekbones move backward and the forehead moves forward as a person ages. The facial bones also seem to tilt forward as a person gets older.
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  • When do men stop growing?

    Q: When do men stop growing?

    A: Most males have reached their full height by age 16, but their muscles still grow. Much of the height increase comes from a growth spurt between ages 12 and 16. During this period, boys often add as many as 12 inches. They also put on weight, and this gain typically ranges from 15 to 65 pounds.
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  • Does listening to music affect your reaction time?

    Q: Does listening to music affect your reaction time?

    A: Listening to loud music has a small effect on reaction time. Music at low and moderate levels does not affect reaction time in a significant way.
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  • How long does it take for water to get to the bladder?

    Q: How long does it take for water to get to the bladder?

    A: On average, it takes the human body approximately two to three hours to excrete a liter of water through the bladder. This is dependent on several factors, including the absorption of water, the components in the water, if dehydration is present, the time of day and the general health of the person.
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  • What causes severe hunger pains?

    Q: What causes severe hunger pains?

    A: Better Medicine states that hunger is the result of a complicated group of interactions controlled by the body's endocrine, digestive and neurological systems. These systems send chemicals to the brain to indicate both hunger and fullness. When a person consistently experiences excessive hunger, it can be a sign of illness.
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  • What is the function of the hammer in the ear?

    Q: What is the function of the hammer in the ear?

    A: The hammer in the ear, also called the malleus, transmits sound vibration to the anvil from the eardrum. The hammer and the anvil, also called the incus, are two of three very small, linked and movable bones in the ear. The other is the stirrup or stapes. Together, these three bones transmit sounds through the inner ear. InnerBody states that "the small bones create fluid membrane waves by converting compression sound waves from the eardrum."
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  • Are attached earlobes dominant or recessive?

    Q: Are attached earlobes dominant or recessive?

    A: Attached earlobes are considered to be recessive. Free earlobes are a dominant trait. This means that far more people have earlobes that are unattached.
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  • What is the purpose of fat in the body?

    Q: What is the purpose of fat in the body?

    A: Fat supplies calories, provides essential fatty acids and serves as the storage substance for the excess calories of the body, according to the health guide of The New York Times. It helps move certain vitamins through the bloodstream, and it maintains healthy hair and skin.
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  • How does a sheep brain and a human brain compare?

    Q: How does a sheep brain and a human brain compare?

    A: There are significant differences between the human brain and the brains of sheep; for instance, the human brain is larger in size and heavier when compared to a sheep’s brain. An adult human brain weighs 1,300 to 1,400 grams, while the brain of a sheep weighs in at around 140 grams. Sheep brains have less ridges and contours in comparison to human brains.
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  • What is the function of Meissner's corpuscles?

    Q: What is the function of Meissner's corpuscles?

    A: Meissner's corpuscles, also known as tactile corpuscles, are nerve endings that are responsible for detecting a light touch to the skin. The are considered a type of mechanoreceptor since they are responsive to physical pressure. Meissner's corpuscles have the lowest sensitivity threshold of any type of mechanoreceptor; they can sense vibrations with frequencies as low as 10 Hertz.
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  • How do you put someone to sleep fast using pressure points?

    Q: How do you put someone to sleep fast using pressure points?

    A: An acupressure practitioner can send someone to sleep quickly by applying pressure on one or several of his pressure points. For example, applying pressure on the middle of the inner side of the wrist, between the eyebrows or on the center of the breastbone can help induce quick sleep.
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  • Does everybody have a birthmark?

    Q: Does everybody have a birthmark?

    A: Everybody is not born with a birthmark. More than 10 babies out of 100 have a birthmark when they are born or develop one shortly after birth.
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  • What is a high instep?

    Q: What is a high instep?

    A: A high instep is a type of foot structure in which the arch of the foot does not fall flat when bearing weight. This condition, also known as a supinated foot and Pes Cavus, occurs in about 8 to 15 per cent of the population, according to MedicMD.
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