Human Anatomy

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Located at the back of the brain, the occipital lobes are the part of it responsible for sight. They are part of the cerebral cortex. The temporal lobes and the parietal lobe also play a role in visual perception.

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  • What are the names of the five fingers of the hand?

    Q: What are the names of the five fingers of the hand?

    A: The five fingers of a typical human hand are the thumb, index finger, middle finger, ring finger and baby finger. The baby finger is often referred to as the pinky.
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  • What is a nasal passage?

    Q: What is a nasal passage?

    A: The nasal passage is a channel wherein air flows through the nose. Respiratory mucous membranes with many hair-like cells line the walls of this passage.
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  • What is the function of the alveoli?

    Q: What is the function of the alveoli?

    A: The function of the alveoli is to assist in oxygen exchange through the membranes of the small balloon-like structures. The alveoli are found on the branches of the bronchial passages.
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  • What is the relationship between anatomy and physiology?

    Q: What is the relationship between anatomy and physiology?

    A: Anatomy is the study of form, while physiology is the study of function, according to Wikipedia. Anatomy is the scientific study of the structure of organisms including their systems, organs and tissues. It details the appearance and position of various parts, their material compositions and their locations and relationships with other parts. Physiology deals respectively with the functions of those anatomical parts and the chemical processes involved.
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  • When do men stop growing?

    Q: When do men stop growing?

    A: Most males have reached their full height by age 16, but their muscles still grow. Much of the height increase comes from a growth spurt between ages 12 and 16. During this period, boys often add as many as 12 inches. They also put on weight, and this gain typically ranges from 15 to 65 pounds.
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  • How many years of your life do you spend sleeping?

    Q: How many years of your life do you spend sleeping?

    A: The Mirror reports that humans, on average, spend a total of 227,468 hours, or 26 years, of their lives sleeping. According to the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research, this amount translates into one-third, or 33 percent, of a person's total lifetime spent sleeping.
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  • Why does asparagus make your pee smell?

    Q: Why does asparagus make your pee smell?

    A: Asparagus pee (for lack of a better term) is a centuries-old problem, and scientists still aren't sure what causes its unique odor. Adding to the uncertainty is a strange phenomenon: a portion of the population either doesn't produce the smell or can't smell it at all.
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  • What are two factors that contribute to knee stability?

    Q: What are two factors that contribute to knee stability?

    A: According to the Western Journal of Medicine, the knee is stabilized by the shape of the joint and the ligaments accompanying it. The joint is shaped by the local bone protuberances and the surrounding cartilage. The many ligaments that support the knee joint include the cruciate (cross-shaped) and collateral ligaments.
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  • What is the difference between a belch and a burp?

    Q: What is the difference between a belch and a burp?

    A: According to the Mayo Clinic, there is no difference between a belch and a burp. By performing this reflexive action, the body removes excess air that is in the stomach.
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  • Why do people have dimples?

    Q: Why do people have dimples?

    A: Dimples are the result of a deformity that makes facial muscles shorter than normal. The shorter muscles pull the skin when the person smiles, causing indentations in the skin known as dimples. As a person ages, dimples sometimes disappear as muscles naturally lengthen.
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  • What parts of the human body never stop growing?

    Q: What parts of the human body never stop growing?

    A: Italian scientists have confirmed that the parts of the body that consist of cartilage continue to grow until the day of death. This includes one's nose and ears. Earlobes contain cartilage but also elongate due to gravitational force.
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  • When does your head stop growing?

    Q: When does your head stop growing?

    A: The human head never stops growing and changing, according to findings reported by Duke Magazine. While most bones stop growing following puberty, CT scans conducted on 100 men and women demonstrated that the bones of the skull continue to grow and change throughout a person's lifetime.
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  • What causes yawning?

    Q: What causes yawning?

    A: The theories regarding why people yawn range from boredom to cooling the brain to helping the brain to stay more alert. Regardless of what causes yawning, it is widely accepted that yawning is contagious.
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  • How many muscles are there in a human body?

    Q: How many muscles are there in a human body?

    A: According to the Library of Congress, the human body has at least 650 skeletal muscles and as many as 840 depending on what counts as a muscle. Some sources count complex muscles as a single muscle, while others count complex muscles' individual parts as separate muscles, which leads to dissent.
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  • At what age is the human brain fully developed?

    Q: At what age is the human brain fully developed?

    A: While no specific age has been identified as the age at which the human brain is fully mature, the Washington Post relates that many scientists agree that the brain does not reach maturity until at least the mid-20s. Some studies suggest that the brain continues to develop into the early 30s.
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  • Is the tongue the strongest muscle in your body?

    Q: Is the tongue the strongest muscle in your body?

    A: According to HowStuffWorks, the famous myth that the tongue is the strongest muscle in the body is not true. The tongue is made up of skeletal muscle fibers, allowing its owner to control it voluntarily. It is an essential part of the digestive system in keeping food between the teeth for chewing, the first part of the digestive process. Several other muscles have strength in different capacities that outweigh the strength of tongue.
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  • What happens when too much adrenaline is produced?

    Q: What happens when too much adrenaline is produced?

    A: When the body produces too much adrenaline, a person likely has phaeochromocytoma, a rare tumor of the adrenal medulla, according to the Society for Endocrinology. Symptoms of this condition include high blood pressure, fast heartbeat, palpitations, excessive sweating, weight loss and anxiety.
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  • What are the roles of joints, bones and muscles?

    Q: What are the roles of joints, bones and muscles?

    A: Bones, muscles and joints play an important role in the human body. They, along with tendons, ligaments and cartilage, form the musculoskeletal system and enable us to perform physical activity. The musculoskeletal system protects and supports internal organs, allows movement, gives the body its shape, produces blood cells, stores calcium and phosphorus, and produces heat.
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  • What part of the brain do we use when we dream?

    Q: What part of the brain do we use when we dream?

    A: According to Bryn Mawr College, the pons is largely responsible for dreaming because of its role in regulating REM sleep, which is vital for dreaming. Damage to the pons can result in loss of dreaming sleep.
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  • What are the similarities between cat and human anatomy?

    Q: What are the similarities between cat and human anatomy?

    A: According to Melodie Anne Coffman for The Nest, cats and humans share many anatomical similarities within the lungs, heart, digestive system, urinary tract and sex organs. Cats also share very basic elements of anatomy with humans, including eyes, mouths, ears, noses, bones, tongues, teeth and skin.
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  • Why is the sense of touch important?

    Q: Why is the sense of touch important?

    A: The sense of touch is important because it allows animals to derive information about their surroundings when the other senses are not appropriate. Some animals rely on the sense of touch more than others do. Typically, animals with a very poor sense of sight develop an exquisite sense of touch.
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