Human Anatomy

A:

A group of muscle cells, or myocytes, is known as a muscle fascicle. Muscle fascicles are connected by a connective tissue sheath, known as the perimysium.

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  • What Is the Function of the Aorta?

    Q: What Is the Function of the Aorta?

    A: The aorta is a large blood vessel that branches off from the heart and pumps oxygen-rich blood back into the body. The aorta carries blood away from the left ventricle and circulates it into the systemic circuit. The systemic circuit are the vessels between the aortic semilunar valve and the entrance to the right atrium.
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  • At What Age Does Your Head Stop Growing?

    Q: At What Age Does Your Head Stop Growing?

    A: Duke Magazine reports that the bones in the head continue to grow throughout a person's lifetime. The cheekbones move backward and the forehead moves forward as a person ages. The facial bones also seem to tilt forward as a person gets older.
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  • What Part of the Brain Does Music Affect?

    Q: What Part of the Brain Does Music Affect?

    A: Initially, a person's temporal and frontal lobes begin processing the sounds of music when a song begins to play, with brain cells deciphering melody, rhythm and pitch. Many researchers believe most activity concerning music happens in the brain's right hemisphere, while other researchers say it happens on both sides.
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  • How Does Skin Regulate Body Temperature?

    Q: How Does Skin Regulate Body Temperature?

    A: Sweat glands and fatty layers in the skin help to regulate body temperature in mammals. When the outside temperature is high, sweat glands release bodily fluids combined with salt to keep the body temperature from getting too high. When the outside temperature is low, fatty layers on the skin act as insulation, trapping heat and keeping it from leaving the body.
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  • What Are the Similarities Between a Fetal Pig's Anatomy and a Human's Anatomy?

    Q: What Are the Similarities Between a Fetal Pig's Anatomy and a Human's Anatomy?

    A: According to Goshen College's Fetal Pig Dissection Guide, a fetal pig's anatomy is similar to the anatomy of a human because both animals are mammals, and both contain the same vital organs. Pigs have the same muscles as humans in almost every case; however, since pigs are quadrupedal and humans are bipedal, there are small variations between size and location of some muscles.
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  • What Is Located Where the Nose and Mouth Come Together?

    Q: What Is Located Where the Nose and Mouth Come Together?

    A: According to Medline Plus, the body feature located between the nose and mouth is called the "philtrum." It consists of a groove in the skin and muscle. It can be wide, narrow, short, long, deep or shallow based on genetic background.
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  • Why Is the Sense of Touch Important?

    Q: Why Is the Sense of Touch Important?

    A: The sense of touch is important because it allows animals to derive information about their surroundings when the other senses are not appropriate. Some animals rely on the sense of touch more than others do. Typically, animals with a very poor sense of sight develop an exquisite sense of touch.
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  • What Is a High Instep?

    Q: What Is a High Instep?

    A: A high instep is a type of foot structure in which the arch of the foot does not fall flat when bearing weight. This condition, also known as a supinated foot and Pes Cavus, occurs in about 8 to 15 per cent of the population, according to MedicMD.
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  • Can the Veins in Your Body Reach Around the World?

    Q: Can the Veins in Your Body Reach Around the World?

    A: When laid out back-to-back in a single line, the blood vessels of one human being are long enough to wrap around the world more than two times, according to The Franklin Institute. This equals a length of 60,000 to 100,000 miles long, depending on the individual.
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  • What Age Do Feet Stop Growing?

    Q: What Age Do Feet Stop Growing?

    A: The growth plates in feet stop growing sometime during the late teen years, but shoe size often continues to change over the course of a person's lifetime.
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  • What Are Six Substances Transported by Blood?

    Q: What Are Six Substances Transported by Blood?

    A: The blood transports oxygen, carbon dioxide, nutrients, water, hormones, waste substances and heat. The waste substances are moved to the liver and kidneys, which remove toxins from the blood. Urea is moved from the liver to the kidneys.
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  • How Does a Sheep Brain and a Human Brain Compare?

    Q: How Does a Sheep Brain and a Human Brain Compare?

    A: There are significant differences between the human brain and the brains of sheep; for instance, the human brain is larger in size and heavier when compared to a sheep’s brain. An adult human brain weighs 1,300 to 1,400 grams, while the brain of a sheep weighs in at around 140 grams. Sheep brains have less ridges and contours in comparison to human brains.
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  • Where Is the Navel Located on the Human Body?

    Q: Where Is the Navel Located on the Human Body?

    A: The navel is located on the front of the body, roughly half way up the abdomen. There is a great variety in navel size and shape among humans.
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  • What Is a Nasal Passage?

    Q: What Is a Nasal Passage?

    A: The nasal passage is a channel wherein air flows through the nose. Respiratory mucous membranes with many hair-like cells line the walls of this passage.
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  • What Causes Lack of Oxygen?

    Q: What Causes Lack of Oxygen?

    A: Lack of oxygen, or hypoxia, can be caused by a wide range of medical and environmental factors. Externally, lack of oxygen is usually the result of exposure to low-oxygen environments, such as those at high altitudes. This is why the FAA recommends that pilots use supplemental oxygen for altitudes over 10,000 feet in the day and 6,000 feet at night, according to About.com.
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  • Does Everybody Have a Birthmark?

    Q: Does Everybody Have a Birthmark?

    A: Everybody is not born with a birthmark. More than 10 babies out of 100 have a birthmark when they are born or develop one shortly after birth.
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  • How Long Does It Take to Digest Liquids?

    Q: How Long Does It Take to Digest Liquids?

    A: On average, food takes six to eight hours to pass through the stomach and small intestines. Liquids are not digested separately from foods, and they follow the same digestion process. In liquid-only diets, the digestion process may take fewer hours, as the stomach doesn't have to mechanically break down food.
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  • How Much Food Does the Average Person Eat in a Day?

    Q: How Much Food Does the Average Person Eat in a Day?

    A: An average person eats about 2000 calories a day, according to a study conducted by the University of Westminster's Human Performance Laboratory. The six women studied consumed between 1770 to 2600 calories a day, as published in the Mirror.
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  • What Is the Most Popular Eye Color?

    Q: What Is the Most Popular Eye Color?

    A: Brown eyes are the most popular eye color in the world, in terms of prevalence. More than 55 percent of the world's population has brown eyes.
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  • What Is an Average Wrist Size?

    Q: What Is an Average Wrist Size?

    A: According to Watch Cases, the average wrist size for adults is 7.17 inches. This measurement varies according to the height, build and age of a person.
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  • What Causes Severe Hunger Pains?

    Q: What Causes Severe Hunger Pains?

    A: Better Medicine states that hunger is the result of a complicated group of interactions controlled by the body's endocrine, digestive and neurological systems. These systems send chemicals to the brain to indicate both hunger and fullness. When a person consistently experiences excessive hunger, it can be a sign of illness.
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