Forensic Science

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Creating your own DNA fingerprint helps you to learn about DNA. This process takes about an hour to put together and overnight to set. You need a DNA sample, beakers, a laboratory, restriction enzymes, a gel tray, an electrophoresis apparatus, buffer solution, a staining sheet and a staining tray.

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  • Why is forensic science so important?

    Q: Why is forensic science so important?

    A: Forensic science is important because it aids in establishing the guilt or innocence of potential suspects. Forensic evidence is also useful for linking crimes, which establishes the patterns of crimes and also narrows the number of probable suspects.
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  • How do you create a DNA fingerprint?

    Q: How do you create a DNA fingerprint?

    A: Creating your own DNA fingerprint helps you to learn about DNA. This process takes about an hour to put together and overnight to set. You need a DNA sample, beakers, a laboratory, restriction enzymes, a gel tray, an electrophoresis apparatus, buffer solution, a staining sheet and a staining tray.
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  • What tools do forensic scientists use?

    Q: What tools do forensic scientists use?

    A: Forensic scientists use various tools to accomplish their tasks including rubber gloves, a head rest, dissection scissors, ropes, and goggles, including arterial and jugular tubes. They also have an autopsy table, autopsy saws, blades and a dissecting knife. Other tools include X-ray boxes, a fingerprint set, an osteometric board, a water bath and post-mortem needles.
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  • How is spectrophotometry used in forensics?

    Q: How is spectrophotometry used in forensics?

    A: Spectrophotometry is used in forensics to identify drugs or other toxins. When identifying an unknown drug or chemical, forensic scientists will use spectrophotometry to analyze how the unknown substance reacts to ultraviolet and infrared light to identify its composition.
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  • What are the five steps in the scientific method?

    Q: What are the five steps in the scientific method?

    A: According to HowStuffWorks.com, the five steps in the scientific method are make an observation, ask a question, form a hypothesis, conduct an experiment and accept or reject the hypothesis. Various numbers of steps are sometimes used to explain the scientific method, but they all include the same ideas.
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  • What is blood spatter analysis?

    Q: What is blood spatter analysis?

    A: Blood spatter analysis is a forensic science involving the study of bloodstain patterns that criminologists use to reconstruct the events of a suspected crime. Analysts examine subtle factors such as the placement, shape and volume of blood to determine the weapon and amount of force used in an attack.
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  • How is chromatography used in forensic science?

    Q: How is chromatography used in forensic science?

    A: Chromatography is used in forensic science to identify drug use, differentiate between different bomb powders and highlight the chemical composition of different substances. As an approach that allows forensic scientists to separate chemical components, chromatography either detects the substance immediately, or it makes it easier to move onto a precise test.
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  • Q: How long does embalming last?

    A: Embalming doesn't last forever; even if done perfectly. Several factors come in to play when asking how soon a body will begin to decompose after being embalmed.
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  • What are the different stages of rigor mortis?

    Q: What are the different stages of rigor mortis?

    A: The six stages of rigor mortis in humans include absent, minimal, moderate, advanced, complete and passed, according to the Medicolegal Death Investigators' training manual on Education Portal. When rigor mortis occurs, the body's muscles harden after death in a gradual process.
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  • How long does it take for rigor mortis to start after a cat passes?

    Q: How long does it take for rigor mortis to start after a cat passes?

    A: Rigor mortis can take between three to six hours to set in after the death of a cat, according to Rest in Pets. The condition, which is part of the decomposition process, is a natural occurrence after the death of an animal.
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  • Q: What is a dissecting tray used for?

    A: A dissecting tray provides containment for materials resulting from the dissection process. It allows enough space for the analysis of the specimen to take place while also providing drainage for water and other substances.
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  • Q: What is a dissecting microscope?

    A: Dissecting microscopes, also known as stereo microscopes, are scientific instruments used to obtain three-dimensional images of obtained specimens. The microscope trains two different lenses on the specimen in order to obtain the image.
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  • Q: What is a buccal swab test?

    A: A buccal swab test is a method of collecting DNA samples. According to the Laboratory Corporation of America, DNA samples are collected by rubbing the inside of the mouth with cotton-tipped swab. Unlike obtaining DNA from blood, buccal swab tests are non-invasive.
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  • What do scientists use to find out how old an archaeological find is?

    Q: What do scientists use to find out how old an archaeological find is?

    A: Scientists use dating techniques to find out the age of archaeological finds. There are many types of dating techniques, including natural dating techniques, electromagnetic dating techniques, chemical dating techniques and radiometric dating techniques.
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  • Q: Who is Leone Lattes in forensics?

    A: Leone Lattes was the forensic serologist who, in 1915, developed a method for restoring dried blood samples so they could be tested for blood type. In 1932, Lattes developed a method for determining blood type from a dry sample.
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  • How do you pass a polygraph test?

    Q: How do you pass a polygraph test?

    A: A polygraph test can be passed by manipulating the body's response to control questions. A participant's lies are only considered lies when they register a higher response than control questions. The results can therefore be manipulated in a participant's favor if the participant is able to elicit a higher response to control questions than the relevant questions of the examination.
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  • Q: How do you create a hypothesis about fingerprinting?

    A: To create a hypothesis for fingerprinting, investigators ask questions based on what they know about the specific topic in question and come up with a statement that can be proven through an experiment. Then, based on their prior observations, they develop a statement to test. For example, an experiment on whether fingerprints are hereditary might read "If fingerprints are hereditary, then testing with a fingerprinting kit will show that all members of a family have similar fingerprints."
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  • How long do fingerprints stay on objects?

    Q: How long do fingerprints stay on objects?

    A: No scientific methods can determine the length of time for which a fingerprint lasts on an object. There are many factors that determine how long a fingerprint lasts on any surface or object, with environmental conditions being the primary influence on the longevity of the prints.
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  • Q: What are some types of forensic science?

    A: The field of forensic science includes a number of disciplines, such as anthropology, odontology and toxicology. These experts find, collect and preserve evidence in criminal cases.
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  • Q: What techniques did Alec Jeffreys develop for genetic fingerprinting?

    A: Professor Sir Alec Jeffreys' 1984 development of genetic fingerprinting revolved around a technique that points out the unique nature of an individual's DNA code. He showed that restriction fragment length polymorphism, a variation in chromosome pairs, can occur in over 10,000,000 different places, indicating that a person's genetic code is unique to the point that it can be used for positive identification.
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  • What are some famous forensic entomology cases?

    Q: What are some famous forensic entomology cases?

    A: Some famous forensic entomology cases include the cases of Paul Bernardo, David Westerfield and Ronald Porter. The forensic entomology information was presented in trial, but was not always used by the judges due to the constraints on forensic entomology.
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