Forensic Science

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Creating your own DNA fingerprint helps you to learn about DNA. This process takes about an hour to put together and overnight to set. You need a DNA sample, beakers, a laboratory, restriction enzymes, a gel tray, an electrophoresis apparatus, buffer solution, a staining sheet and a staining tray.

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  • Why is forensic science so important?

    Q: Why is forensic science so important?

    A: Forensic science is important because it aids in establishing the guilt or innocence of potential suspects. Forensic evidence is also useful for linking crimes, which establishes the patterns of crimes and also narrows the number of probable suspects.
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  • How do you create a DNA fingerprint?

    Q: How do you create a DNA fingerprint?

    A: Creating your own DNA fingerprint helps you to learn about DNA. This process takes about an hour to put together and overnight to set. You need a DNA sample, beakers, a laboratory, restriction enzymes, a gel tray, an electrophoresis apparatus, buffer solution, a staining sheet and a staining tray.
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  • What tools do forensic scientists use?

    Q: What tools do forensic scientists use?

    A: Forensic scientists use various tools to accomplish their tasks including rubber gloves, a head rest, dissection scissors, ropes, and goggles, including arterial and jugular tubes. They also have an autopsy table, autopsy saws, blades and a dissecting knife. Other tools include X-ray boxes, a fingerprint set, an osteometric board, a water bath and post-mortem needles.
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  • How is spectrophotometry used in forensics?

    Q: How is spectrophotometry used in forensics?

    A: Spectrophotometry is used in forensics to identify drugs or other toxins. When identifying an unknown drug or chemical, forensic scientists will use spectrophotometry to analyze how the unknown substance reacts to ultraviolet and infrared light to identify its composition.
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  • What is forensic photography?

    Q: What is forensic photography?

    A: Forensic photography is a type of photography that showcases accidents and crime scenes. This type of photography creates a visual record of evidence usable by the police and in court.
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  • How is chromatography used to solve crime?

    Q: How is chromatography used to solve crime?

    A: Chromatography is used to separate substances from crime scene samples to pinpoint information about materials. This information can then assist investigators with finding what was used by criminals.
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  • Q: What clothes does a forensic scientist wear?

    A: When entering a crime scene, forensic scientists wear protective clothing over their regular clothes to prevent contamination. This may include a full-body suit with a hood, a mask, booties and gloves.
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  • Why do we bury bodies six feet under?

    Q: Why do we bury bodies six feet under?

    A: The common phrase "six feet under" is traced back to England in 1665, when an outbreak of the plague led the mayor of London to enact a law requiring all graves to be at least six feet deep in an attempt to limit the spread of disease. Today, many bodies are not actually buried six feet underground, but laws still exist to mandate burial requirements.
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  • Q: What is some good information about forensic ballistics?

    A: According to Explore Forensics, ballistics in the area of forensic science deals with firearms as to why and how they are used, most frequently in the practice of murder. Many people do not realize that when a person is shot, the wound and the condition of the victim can tell a lot about the weapon that was used, notes Explore Forensics.
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  • What does an undertaker do to a body?

    Q: What does an undertaker do to a body?

    A: An undertaker's roll is to prepare a body for the embalming process as well a prepare the body for a funeral service if necessary. When an embalming takes place, an undertaker cleans the body, injects embalming fluid into the arteries, treats body cavities and other processes to prepare the body for burial, according to ListVerse. An undertaker is also known as an embalmer.
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  • Q: What is a dissecting microscope?

    A: Dissecting microscopes, also known as stereo microscopes, are scientific instruments used to obtain three-dimensional images of obtained specimens. The microscope trains two different lenses on the specimen in order to obtain the image.
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  • Q: What is a friction ridge?

    A: A friction ridge is most commonly known as the skin that is found on the palms of the hands and the bottoms of the feet. Fingerprints are another name for a friction ridge.
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  • How long do fingerprints last?

    Q: How long do fingerprints last?

    A: Each human has a unique set of fingerprints, and every person will have the same unique prints for their entire lives. The length of time a print lasts on a specific object depends on the object's surface characteristics and environment.
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  • Q: What is a buccal swab test?

    A: A buccal swab test is a method of collecting DNA samples. According to the Laboratory Corporation of America, DNA samples are collected by rubbing the inside of the mouth with cotton-tipped swab. Unlike obtaining DNA from blood, buccal swab tests are non-invasive.
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  • What is blood spatter analysis?

    Q: What is blood spatter analysis?

    A: Blood spatter analysis is a forensic science involving the study of bloodstain patterns that criminologists use to reconstruct the events of a suspected crime. Analysts examine subtle factors such as the placement, shape and volume of blood to determine the weapon and amount of force used in an attack.
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  • What are some forensic anthropology cases?

    Q: What are some forensic anthropology cases?

    A: In 2004, forensic anthropology findings led New Jersey prosecutors to reinvestigate the cause of James Ridgeway's death, which was inconclusive in 1979. In another case, reconstructive techniques helped identify the fragmented remains of a San Diego woman named Joy Risker, whose body was buried in an Arizona desert.
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  • Q: What is the purpose of funeral embalming?

    A: The purpose of embalming is to preserve the tissues in the body and delay decomposition. Many people choose embalming because it helps the body look more life-like for public viewing purposes at a funeral or memorial service.
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  • How do you pass a polygraph test?

    Q: How do you pass a polygraph test?

    A: A polygraph test can be passed by manipulating the body's response to control questions. A participant's lies are only considered lies when they register a higher response than control questions. The results can therefore be manipulated in a participant's favor if the participant is able to elicit a higher response to control questions than the relevant questions of the examination.
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  • What are the different stages of rigor mortis?

    Q: What are the different stages of rigor mortis?

    A: The six stages of rigor mortis in humans include absent, minimal, moderate, advanced, complete and passed, according to the Medicolegal Death Investigators' training manual on Education Portal. When rigor mortis occurs, the body's muscles harden after death in a gradual process.
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  • What are the pros and cons of forensic science?

    Q: What are the pros and cons of forensic science?

    A: Some pros of forensic science are that it provides evidence that can be used to help convict criminals and overturn wrongful convictions, but it can also be costly and time consuming to process the evidence. Even when there is some type of forensic evidence, it is possible for the evidence to be processed incorrectly, yielding an inaccurate result.
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  • Q: What are some facts about fossils?

    A: Fossils are the remains of plant or animal life that were buried for millions of years until they finally turned to stone. Most fossils found today are from creatures that lived in the sea, as these had a much better chance of being buried before they were destroyed.
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