Forensic Science

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Creating your own DNA fingerprint helps you to learn about DNA. This process takes about an hour to put together and overnight to set. You need a DNA sample, beakers, a laboratory, restriction enzymes, a gel tray, an electrophoresis apparatus, buffer solution, a staining sheet and a staining tray.

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  • What Tools Do Forensic Scientists Use?

    Q: What Tools Do Forensic Scientists Use?

    A: Forensic scientists use various tools to accomplish their tasks including rubber gloves, a head rest, dissection scissors, ropes, and goggles, including arterial and jugular tubes. They also have an autopsy table, autopsy saws, blades and a dissecting knife. Other tools include X-ray boxes, a fingerprint set, an osteometric board, a water bath and post-mortem needles.
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  • How Is Spectrophotometry Used in Forensics?

    Q: How Is Spectrophotometry Used in Forensics?

    A: Spectrophotometry is used in forensics to identify drugs or other toxins. When identifying an unknown drug or chemical, forensic scientists will use spectrophotometry to analyze how the unknown substance reacts to ultraviolet and infrared light to identify its composition.
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  • Why Is Forensic Science so Important?

    Q: Why Is Forensic Science so Important?

    A: Forensic science is important because it aids in establishing the guilt or innocence of potential suspects. Forensic evidence is also useful for linking crimes, which establishes the patterns of crimes and also narrows the number of probable suspects.
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  • How Do You Create a DNA Fingerprint?

    Q: How Do You Create a DNA Fingerprint?

    A: Creating your own DNA fingerprint helps you to learn about DNA. This process takes about an hour to put together and overnight to set. You need a DNA sample, beakers, a laboratory, restriction enzymes, a gel tray, an electrophoresis apparatus, buffer solution, a staining sheet and a staining tray.
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  • Q: How Do You Create a Hypothesis About Fingerprinting?

    A: To create a hypothesis for fingerprinting, investigators ask questions based on what they know about the specific topic in question and come up with a statement that can be proven through an experiment. Then, based on their prior observations, they develop a statement to test. For example, an experiment on whether fingerprints are hereditary might read "If fingerprints are hereditary, then testing with a fingerprinting kit will show that all members of a family have similar fingerprints."
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  • What Is Blood Spatter Analysis?

    Q: What Is Blood Spatter Analysis?

    A: Blood spatter analysis is a forensic science involving the study of bloodstain patterns that criminologists use to reconstruct the events of a suspected crime. Analysts examine subtle factors such as the placement, shape and volume of blood to determine the weapon and amount of force used in an attack.
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  • Q: What Is a Friction Ridge?

    A: A friction ridge is most commonly known as the skin that is found on the palms of the hands and the bottoms of the feet. Fingerprints are another name for a friction ridge.
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  • How Is Chromatography Used in Forensic Science?

    Q: How Is Chromatography Used in Forensic Science?

    A: Chromatography is used in forensic science to identify drug use, differentiate between different bomb powders and highlight the chemical composition of different substances. As an approach that allows forensic scientists to separate chemical components, chromatography either detects the substance immediately, or it makes it easier to move onto a precise test.
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  • What Are the Different Types of Toxicology?

    Q: What Are the Different Types of Toxicology?

    A: Toxicology includes the fields of forensic, chemical, aquatic, eco- and environmental toxicology, and toxicogenomics. Toxicology is a biological field of study on the harmful effects of chemicals on biological organisms.
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  • What Are the Pros and Cons of Forensic Science?

    Q: What Are the Pros and Cons of Forensic Science?

    A: Some pros of forensic science are that it provides evidence that can be used to help convict criminals and overturn wrongful convictions, but it can also be costly and time consuming to process the evidence. Even when there is some type of forensic evidence, it is possible for the evidence to be processed incorrectly, yielding an inaccurate result.
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  • Does Film Footage Exist of Bigfoot?

    Q: Does Film Footage Exist of Bigfoot?

    A: The scientific community offers no proof of the existence of Bigfoot as of 2015, but there is a famous recording that reportedly provides video footage of the creature. Roger Patterson shot a 16mm film in 1967 which purportedly captures Bigfootメs image in a wooded area.
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  • Q: What Is a Dissecting Tray Used For?

    A: A dissecting tray provides containment for materials resulting from the dissection process. It allows enough space for the analysis of the specimen to take place while also providing drainage for water and other substances.
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  • What Does an Undertaker Do to a Body?

    Q: What Does an Undertaker Do to a Body?

    A: An undertaker's roll is to prepare a body for the embalming process as well a prepare the body for a funeral service if necessary. When an embalming takes place, an undertaker cleans the body, injects embalming fluid into the arteries, treats body cavities and other processes to prepare the body for burial, according to ListVerse. An undertaker is also known as an embalmer.
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  • Q: What Techniques Did Alec Jeffreys Develop for Genetic Fingerprinting?

    A: Professor Sir Alec Jeffreys' 1984 development of genetic fingerprinting revolved around a technique that points out the unique nature of an individual's DNA code. He showed that restriction fragment length polymorphism, a variation in chromosome pairs, can occur in over 10,000,000 different places, indicating that a person's genetic code is unique to the point that it can be used for positive identification.
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  • How Long Does It Take for Rigor Mortis to Start After a Cat Passes?

    Q: How Long Does It Take for Rigor Mortis to Start After a Cat Passes?

    A: Rigor mortis can take between three to six hours to set in after the death of a cat, according to Rest in Pets. The condition, which is part of the decomposition process, is a natural occurrence after the death of an animal.
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  • What Are the Different Stages of Rigor Mortis?

    Q: What Are the Different Stages of Rigor Mortis?

    A: The six stages of rigor mortis in humans include absent, minimal, moderate, advanced, complete and passed, according to the Medicolegal Death Investigators' training manual on Education Portal. When rigor mortis occurs, the body's muscles harden after death in a gradual process.
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  • What Is Forensic Photography?

    Q: What Is Forensic Photography?

    A: Forensic photography is a type of photography that showcases accidents and crime scenes. This type of photography creates a visual record of evidence usable by the police and in court.
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  • Q: What Is Some Good Information About Forensic Ballistics?

    A: According to Explore Forensics, ballistics in the area of forensic science deals with firearms as to why and how they are used, most frequently in the practice of murder. Many people do not realize that when a person is shot, the wound and the condition of the victim can tell a lot about the weapon that was used, notes Explore Forensics.
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  • What Do Scientists Use to Find Out How Old an Archaeological Find Is?

    Q: What Do Scientists Use to Find Out How Old an Archaeological Find Is?

    A: Scientists use dating techniques to find out the age of archaeological finds. There are many types of dating techniques, including natural dating techniques, electromagnetic dating techniques, chemical dating techniques and radiometric dating techniques.
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  • Q: Who Is Leone Lattes in Forensics?

    A: Leone Lattes was the forensic serologist who, in 1915, developed a method for restoring dried blood samples so they could be tested for blood type. In 1932, Lattes developed a method for determining blood type from a dry sample.
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  • Q: What Are Leone Lattes's Contributions to Forensic Science?

    A: Leon Lattes developed a method of blood testing that determines the type and characteristics of a dried bloodstain. Bloodstain examinations are often used to gather important forensic evidence in criminal cases.
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