Forensic Science

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Creating your own DNA fingerprint helps you to learn about DNA. This process takes about an hour to put together and overnight to set. You need a DNA sample, beakers, a laboratory, restriction enzymes, a gel tray, an electrophoresis apparatus, buffer solution, a staining sheet and a staining tray.

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  • How do you create a DNA fingerprint?

    Q: How do you create a DNA fingerprint?

    A: Creating your own DNA fingerprint helps you to learn about DNA. This process takes about an hour to put together and overnight to set. You need a DNA sample, beakers, a laboratory, restriction enzymes, a gel tray, an electrophoresis apparatus, buffer solution, a staining sheet and a staining tray.
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  • Why is forensic science so important?

    Q: Why is forensic science so important?

    A: Forensic science is important because it aids in establishing the guilt or innocence of potential suspects. Forensic evidence is also useful for linking crimes, which establishes the patterns of crimes and also narrows the number of probable suspects.
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  • How is spectrophotometry used in forensics?

    Q: How is spectrophotometry used in forensics?

    A: Spectrophotometry is used in forensics to identify drugs or other toxins. When identifying an unknown drug or chemical, forensic scientists will use spectrophotometry to analyze how the unknown substance reacts to ultraviolet and infrared light to identify its composition.
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  • What tools do forensic scientists use?

    Q: What tools do forensic scientists use?

    A: Forensic scientists use various tools to accomplish their tasks including rubber gloves, a head rest, dissection scissors, ropes, and goggles, including arterial and jugular tubes. They also have an autopsy table, autopsy saws, blades and a dissecting knife. Other tools include X-ray boxes, a fingerprint set, an osteometric board, a water bath and post-mortem needles.
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  • Q: What are the differences between DNA fingerprinting and regular fingerprinting?

    A: Regular fingerprinting methods conduct tests and make records of finger and thumb prints of an individual, while DNA fingerprinting tests the deoxyribonucleic acid of a person, which is located within the nucleus of all cells in the body, states The Tech Museum of Innovation. During DNA fingerprinting, scientists analyze the genetic material to determine the differences in DNA between individuals.
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  • How long do fingerprints last?

    Q: How long do fingerprints last?

    A: Each human has a unique set of fingerprints, and every person will have the same unique prints for their entire lives. The length of time a print lasts on a specific object depends on the object's surface characteristics and environment.
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  • What do scientists use to find out how old an archaeological find is?

    Q: What do scientists use to find out how old an archaeological find is?

    A: Scientists use dating techniques to find out the age of archaeological finds. There are many types of dating techniques, including natural dating techniques, electromagnetic dating techniques, chemical dating techniques and radiometric dating techniques.
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  • What is forensic photography?

    Q: What is forensic photography?

    A: Forensic photography is a type of photography that showcases accidents and crime scenes. This type of photography creates a visual record of evidence usable by the police and in court.
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  • Does film footage exist of Bigfoot?

    Q: Does film footage exist of Bigfoot?

    A: The scientific community offers no proof of the existence of Bigfoot as of 2015, but there is a famous recording that reportedly provides video footage of the creature. Roger Patterson shot a 16mm film in 1967 which purportedly captures Bigfootメs image in a wooded area.
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  • What does an undertaker do to a body?

    Q: What does an undertaker do to a body?

    A: An undertaker's roll is to prepare a body for the embalming process as well a prepare the body for a funeral service if necessary. When an embalming takes place, an undertaker cleans the body, injects embalming fluid into the arteries, treats body cavities and other processes to prepare the body for burial, according to ListVerse. An undertaker is also known as an embalmer.
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  • Q: What is a buccal swab test?

    A: A buccal swab test is a method of collecting DNA samples. According to the Laboratory Corporation of America, DNA samples are collected by rubbing the inside of the mouth with cotton-tipped swab. Unlike obtaining DNA from blood, buccal swab tests are non-invasive.
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  • Q: What are some facts about fossils?

    A: Fossils are the remains of plant or animal life that were buried for millions of years until they finally turned to stone. Most fossils found today are from creatures that lived in the sea, as these had a much better chance of being buried before they were destroyed.
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  • Q: How do you use a formaldehyde testing kit?

    A: Most home formaldehyde test kits include a badge or pump for collecting an air sample that is returned to an accredited laboratory for testing. Formaldehyde is of special concern in new or remodeled homes.
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  • Q: How long does embalming last?

    A: Embalming doesn't last forever; even if done perfectly. Several factors come in to play when asking how soon a body will begin to decompose after being embalmed.
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  • Q: How do you obtain DNA for DNA fingerprinting?

    A: To obtain DNA for DNA fingerprinting, a sample of cells from skin, hair, blood, saliva or semen is collected. The white blood cells from the sample are broken open using detergent, and then the usable DNA is separated from all the other cellular material. Subsequently, the extracted DNA is cut into smaller pieces using restriction enzymes.
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  • What are some forensic anthropology cases?

    Q: What are some forensic anthropology cases?

    A: In 2004, forensic anthropology findings led New Jersey prosecutors to reinvestigate the cause of James Ridgeway's death, which was inconclusive in 1979. In another case, reconstructive techniques helped identify the fragmented remains of a San Diego woman named Joy Risker, whose body was buried in an Arizona desert.
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  • What are the five steps in the scientific method?

    Q: What are the five steps in the scientific method?

    A: According to HowStuffWorks.com, the five steps in the scientific method are make an observation, ask a question, form a hypothesis, conduct an experiment and accept or reject the hypothesis. Various numbers of steps are sometimes used to explain the scientific method, but they all include the same ideas.
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  • How long do fingerprints stay on objects?

    Q: How long do fingerprints stay on objects?

    A: No scientific methods can determine the length of time for which a fingerprint lasts on an object. There are many factors that determine how long a fingerprint lasts on any surface or object, with environmental conditions being the primary influence on the longevity of the prints.
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  • How long does it take for rigor mortis to start after a cat passes?

    Q: How long does it take for rigor mortis to start after a cat passes?

    A: Rigor mortis can take between three to six hours to set in after the death of a cat, according to Rest in Pets. The condition, which is part of the decomposition process, is a natural occurrence after the death of an animal.
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  • What is the most common fingerprint pattern?

    Q: What is the most common fingerprint pattern?

    A: Fingerprints patterns are of three types: arches, loops and whorls, and loops are the most common pattern, being found in 65 to 70 percent of all fingerprints. In this pattern, ridges or curved lines enter from one side of the finger, form a loop and exit from the same side.
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  • Q: What is a dissecting microscope?

    A: Dissecting microscopes, also known as stereo microscopes, are scientific instruments used to obtain three-dimensional images of obtained specimens. The microscope trains two different lenses on the specimen in order to obtain the image.
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