Electricity

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According to National Geographic, electricity comes from energy sources such as fossil fuels, wind energy and hydroelectric power. Electricity is transported from a power station via power lines that carry electrical current into communities.

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  • Where does hydropower come from?

    Q: Where does hydropower come from?

    A: Hydropower, also known as hydro-electric power, is generated by hydro-electric dams placed on many of the world's major rivers. These structures divert the flow of the river and harness the force of the water to turn massive turbines that power electricity generators.
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  • How is electrostatic force explained?

    Q: How is electrostatic force explained?

    A: Electrostatic force, which is also called the Coulomb force or Coulomb interaction, is defined as the attraction or repulsion of different particles and materials based on their electrical charges. Electrostatic force is one of the most basic forms of forces used in the physical sciences, and was discovered by a French physicist named Charles-Augustin de Coulomb in the 1700s. Coulomb discovered electrostatic force after undertaking an experiment, and used the concept of electrostatic force to describe the interaction of particles and molecules in a given space.
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  • What are examples of conductors?

    Q: What are examples of conductors?

    A: Examples of conductors include the human body, metals, aqueous solutions of salt, graphite, copper, silver and gold. Conductors are materials that can transfer heat and transmit electricity. Conductors have a high density, allowing particles to flow freely and collide.
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  • How are current and voltage related?

    Q: How are current and voltage related?

    A: Voltage, or electrical pressure, in a system produces a proportionate amount of current when placed across electrical resistance. Ohm's law indicates that 1 volt passed through 1 ohm of resistance produces 1 ampere of current, or electrical flow. Voltage and current, therefore, have a direct relationship most of the time.
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  • How fast does light travel?

    Q: How fast does light travel?

    A: In a vacuum, the speed of light is 186,282 miles per second. This is equal to 299,792 kilometers per second or about 670,616,629 miles per hour.
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  • What does the "C" stand for in E=mc^2?

    Q: What does the "C" stand for in E=mc^2?

    A: The c in Einstein's famous equation stands for the speed of light. Light travels constantly at a speed of 186,000 miles per second, meaning that c equals 186,000 miles per second.
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  • How does a light bulb circuit work?

    Q: How does a light bulb circuit work?

    A: A light bulb circuit works when the electric current flowing through the light bulb combines with the current flowing in the battery or power source. The filament and wires in the light bulb conduct electricity so that electric current can move through an electric circuit.
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  • Does lemon juice conduct electricity?

    Q: Does lemon juice conduct electricity?

    A: According to the California Science Center, lemon juice can both conduct and produce electricity. Lemon juice contains citric acid, which is a strong electrolyte. The electrolytes in lemon produce electricity by allowing two metals to react with each other.
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  • What is electromagnetic radiation?

    Q: What is electromagnetic radiation?

    A: According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, in terms of classical theory, electromagnetic radiation refers to energy that flows at the universal speed of light via free space or a material medium in the form of electric and magnetic fields that comprise electromagnetic waves, such as radio waves, gamma rays and visible light. Electromagnetic waves are characterized by their intensity and the frequency of the electric and magnetic field's time variation.
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  • Where does electricity come from?

    Q: Where does electricity come from?

    A: According to National Geographic, electricity comes from energy sources such as fossil fuels, wind energy and hydroelectric power. Electricity is transported from a power station via power lines that carry electrical current into communities.
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  • What are basic electronics?

    Q: What are basic electronics?

    A: Basic electronics are capacitors, resistors, diodes, transistors, integrated circuits, potentiometers, LEDs, switches, batteries, breadboards and wire. Together, one can use these components to create a host of electronic devices by manipulating electricity.
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  • Who invented neon lights?

    Q: Who invented neon lights?

    A: At the beginning of the 20th century, French engineer, chemist and inventor Georges Claude invented the neon lamp. He sent electricity into a tube of neon gas, which had been discovered by William Ramsey and M. Travers in 1898.
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  • How can I make static electricity?

    Q: How can I make static electricity?

    A: There are many ways to make static electricity. To create a small amount of static electricity a person can develop a static charge by rubbing a glass rod with a silk cloth or amber against wool. The static charge will allow the glass and the amber to attract small amounts of paper and plastic.
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  • How do solar cells work?

    Q: How do solar cells work?

    A: Solar cells work by collecting sunlight and converting it to usable energy. This energy can be used onsite or transported short distances to the local power grid. A typical modern solar cell consists of a transparent protective outer layer, a dark layer to absorb photons and a network of support systems underneath to improve the cell's operational efficiency.
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  • What is eddy current?

    Q: What is eddy current?

    A: An eddy current is an electrical current induced in a piece of metal due to the relative motion of a nearby magnet. Any time a magnet passes a metallic object, its magnetic field induces an electric current, which swirls around near the surface of the metal like an eddy in a river. This electric current creates its own magnetic field, which opposes the motion of the magnet.
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  • Can you use a 12-gauge wire with a 30-amp breaker?

    Q: Can you use a 12-gauge wire with a 30-amp breaker?

    A: A 30-amp breaker does not operate safely with a 12-gauge wire. The minimum wire size that is allowable for use with a 30-amp breaker is 10 gauge.
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  • What is the electromagnetic theory?

    Q: What is the electromagnetic theory?

    A: The electromagnetic theory is a united theory of electromagnetism established by James Clerk Maxwell. This theory primarily discusses the relationships between electric field and magnetic field based from previous observations and experiments related to electricity, magnetism and optics combined.
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  • What are Isaac Newton's scientific achievements?

    Q: What are Isaac Newton's scientific achievements?

    A: Isaac Newton’s scientific achievements include his three laws of motion — inertia, acceleration, and action and reaction the law of universal gravitation, the reflecting telescope and the theory of calculus. Newton published important written works, the most famous of which is “Principia Mathematica,” where he described elliptical orbits, forces in motion, fluids and mechanics.
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  • What is static electricity and how does it affect everyday life?

    Q: What is static electricity and how does it affect everyday life?

    A: Static electricity results from an imbalance between positive and negative charges in an object, according to the Library of Congress. It affects daily life in numerous ways, such as causing hair to rise when a person removes his hat as the electrons get transferred from the hat to the hair.
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  • Can you get struck by lightning through a window?

    Q: Can you get struck by lightning through a window?

    A: Lightning can strike items and people through windows. As a result, the National Weather Service advises people to stay away from windows during lightning storms.
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  • How does a potato produce electricity?

    Q: How does a potato produce electricity?

    A: According to the BBC, potatoes produce electricity by virtue of their acidic juice, which reacts with two electrodes placed in the potato. The chemical reaction produces a weak current between the two electrodes.
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