Earth Science

A:

The San Andreas Fault exemplifies a transform fault plate boundary. Transform fault boundaries consist of two plates sliding against each other in a horizontal motion.

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  • What Is the Earth's Revolution?

    Q: What Is the Earth's Revolution?

    A: The Earth's revolution occurs in two different ways. The Earth revolves around the sun, and it also revolves, or rotates, on its own axis.
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  • How Do Glaciers Change the Landscape?

    Q: How Do Glaciers Change the Landscape?

    A: Glaciers alter the landscape through erosion of the soil and rocks over which they pass. This erosion process leaves a vertical-walled valley similar to an amphitheater at the glacier's sources, according to Reference.com. As they travel through V-shaped valleys, glaciers transform the valley into a U-shape, grinding away cliffs and the bases of slopes. If the ocean fills these valleys, they become fjords.
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  • What Is Considered Low Humidity?

    Q: What Is Considered Low Humidity?

    A: Any humidity of 30 percent or less is considered low and can be dangerous. Low humidity can cause breathing difficulties, discomfort and may damage a home's foundation.
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  • How Are Striations Formed?

    Q: How Are Striations Formed?

    A: Striations are a common feature of rocks that have once been overlain by a moving glacier. The scratches on the rock face are generally straight and all are oriented in the same direction, matching the downhill flow of the ice.
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  • What Are Types of Natural Calamities?

    Q: What Are Types of Natural Calamities?

    A: Types of natural calamities include hurricanes, earthquakes and tsunamis. Often, these calamities are connected such that one sets off another, as with earthquakes and tsunamis. Natural calamities are differentiated from human-made calamities, such as industrial accidents.
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  • What Is the Composition of Air?

    Q: What Is the Composition of Air?

    A: Air is a gaseous substance that is composed primarily of nitrogen, oxygen and argon. The air in the atmosphere that surrounds the Earth is approximately 78 percent nitrogen, 21 percent oxygen and 1 percent argon, with the remainder made up of various other gases including neon, helium and hydrogen.
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  • What Are the Water Cycle Steps, in Order?

    Q: What Are the Water Cycle Steps, in Order?

    A: In order, the steps of the water cycle are evaporation, condensation, sublimation, precipitation, transpiration, runoff and infiltration. Together, all of the steps help regulate the Earth’s water supply and climate.
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  • What Are Abiotic and Biotic Factors in an Ecosystem?

    Q: What Are Abiotic and Biotic Factors in an Ecosystem?

    A: The biotic factors in an ecosystem are physio-chemical or nonliving parts of an environment, while abiotic factors are living components of an environment.
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  • What Technologies Are Used to Explore Deserts?

    Q: What Technologies Are Used to Explore Deserts?

    A: Technologies used to explore deserts include robotic rovers, satellites, online mapping software and image-processing programs. NASA scientists use robotic rovers to explore deserts to prepare for the desert-like terrain located on Mars and the moon.
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  • What Are Different Types of Tornadoes?

    Q: What Are Different Types of Tornadoes?

    A: There are six different types of tornadoes. The most commonly recognized type is the supercell tornado, the type that causes massive destruction. A gustnado is the opposite; it is very weak. It causes leaves and other debris to swirl around on the ground during a storm.
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  • Why Do Natural Disasters Happen?

    Q: Why Do Natural Disasters Happen?

    A: There are many different causes for natural disasters; seismic activity, air pressure, ocean currents and soil erosion are the main causes. A natural disaster can cause damage to property, loss of life and effect the economy of the local area.
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  • What Causes Global Winds?

    Q: What Causes Global Winds?

    A: Global winds refer to the pattern of air movement all around the globe, and they result from the fact that the Earth receives unequal heating from the sun. Not only does the tilt of the Earth's axis mean that different parts of the planet receive disparate amounts of sunlight, but the oceans and lands also heat at different rates. The imbalance in temperature makes heat move toward the poles, both in the wind and in ocean currents. When horizontal variances in air pressure take place as a result, wind occurs.
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  • Where Is the Windiest Place in the World?

    Q: Where Is the Windiest Place in the World?

    A: According to the American Museum of Natural History, Antarctica is the windiest place on earth with winds that are regularly exceed 100 miles per hour. Commonwealth Bay in Antarctica regularly experiences winds in excess of 150 miles per hour.
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  • What Are the Four Biogeochemical Cycles?

    Q: What Are the Four Biogeochemical Cycles?

    A: The four biogeochemical cycles include the water cycle, the carbon cycle, the phosphorous cycle and the nitrogen cycle. These four cycles involve biology, chemistry and geology and describe the flow of nutrients and waste products on Earth.
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  • How Are Rift Valleys Formed?

    Q: How Are Rift Valleys Formed?

    A: Rift valleys form when tectonic forces deep underground exert a pulling force on the terrain. In areas where this occurs, the land splits into a steep-walled valley with a flat floor. Rift valleys can be very narrow, especially early in their formation.
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  • What Is Collection in the Water Cycle?

    Q: What Is Collection in the Water Cycle?

    A: Collection refers to the process by which water gathers back into bodies of water such as rivers, lakes and oceans. This begins with precipitation, when water falls from the clouds in the form of rain, snow, sleet or hail. A lot of the time, precipitation falls directly into a body of water, but at other times, it soaks into the ground, where plants, people and animals end up drinking it as ground water. Most of the water will end up leaching back into bodies of water through the soil.
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  • Why Is a Pothole Called a Pothole?

    Q: Why Is a Pothole Called a Pothole?

    A: The word "pothole" can be split into two distinct morphemes. The first part being "pot," a word derived from Middle English that means "a deep hole," and the second part being "hole," which maintains the same meaning today, that is, a hollowness in the ground.
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  • What Does the Term "environmental Factors" Mean?

    Q: What Does the Term "environmental Factors" Mean?

    A: Environmental factors refer to any element that might bring change to an existing environment. This include human factors such as litter that does not biodegrade, as well as such natural forces as the weather. One thing that is always true about the environment is that it is always in the state of change. Some of these shifts are easy to see, like an avalanche that happens on the side of a mountain as the result of traffic construction activity, while others are less obvious, such as sand finally becoming sandstone.
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  • Why Is the Mississippi River Important?

    Q: Why Is the Mississippi River Important?

    A: The Mississippi River is important due to its necessity in American commerce. Cities such as New Orleans, St. Louis and Minneapolis all get water from the river.
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  • What Is the Difference Between High and Low Tides?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between High and Low Tides?

    A: A high or low tide occurs based on where the highest or lowest part of the wave hits the shore. A high tide reaches further up on the shore than a low tide. Most coastal regions experience two high tides and two low tides every 24 hours and 50 minutes.
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  • Can We Stop the Polar Ice Caps From Melting?

    Q: Can We Stop the Polar Ice Caps From Melting?

    A: Whether or not humankind can keep the polar ice caps from melting is a subject of great debate in which both side cite scientific studies that support their positions. The bulk of scientific and environmental organizations, however, believe that humans can slow or even halt the melting of polar ice caps and global warming by reducing the use of fossil fuels and other man-made chemicals.
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