Earth Science

A:

The formation of a tsunami is a direct result of underwater earthquakes. The energy released during underwater earthquakes is transferred to the water, moving it upward and creating huge waves.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • What is the Great Blue Hole?

    Q: What is the Great Blue Hole?

    A: The Great Blue Hole is an underwater sinkhole frequented by scuba divers for its numerous species of tropical fish and its clear blue waters. Measuring 984 feet across and 410 feet deep, it is located off the coast of Belize, about 62 miles away from Belize City.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What causes day and night?

    Q: What causes day and night?

    A: The Earth is constantly spinning on its axis, allowing sunlight to shine on different areas of the Earth at different times of the day, creating daytime when the Sun hits a specific area. When the Sun is not shining on a specific area of the Earth, it is nighttime. Since the Sun does not hit all of the Earth at the same time, it is daytime in some parts of the world, while it is nighttime in others.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the composition of air?

    Q: What is the composition of air?

    A: Air is a gaseous substance that is composed primarily of nitrogen, oxygen and argon. The air in the atmosphere that surrounds the Earth is approximately 78 percent nitrogen, 21 percent oxygen and 1 percent argon, with the remainder made up of various other gases including neon, helium and hydrogen.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How do glaciers change the landscape?

    Q: How do glaciers change the landscape?

    A: Glaciers alter the landscape through erosion of the soil and rocks over which they pass. This erosion process leaves a vertical-walled valley similar to an amphitheater at the glacier's sources, according to Reference.com. As they travel through V-shaped valleys, glaciers transform the valley into a U-shape, grinding away cliffs and the bases of slopes. If the ocean fills these valleys, they become fjords.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are some interesting facts about the Hubbard Glacier?

    Q: What are some interesting facts about the Hubbard Glacier?

    A: The Hubbard Glacier is the largest tidewater glacier in North America. A tidewater glacier is one that flows into the ocean. The glacier is approximately 7 miles wide at its foot and 76 miles long. These measurements are constantly changing as the Hubbard Glacier continues to grow and move forward.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why is the Mississippi River important?

    Q: Why is the Mississippi River important?

    A: The Mississippi River is important due to its necessity in American commerce. Cities such as New Orleans, St. Louis and Minneapolis all get water from the river.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why are deserts hot in the day and cold at night?

    Q: Why are deserts hot in the day and cold at night?

    A: The heat that radiates from the sun and heats up the land begins to heat up the air and then escapes into the atmosphere due to the lack of clouds and humidity. This is the main reason that deserts can be hot during the day but cold during the night.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the coldest layer of the Earth's Atmosphere?

    Q: What is the coldest layer of the Earth's Atmosphere?

    A: Temperatures can reach lows of -90 degrees Celsius in the mesosphere, making it the coldest layer of the earth's atmosphere. The mesosphere extends above the stratosphere and ranges from 50 km to 87 km above the surface.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are the abiotic and biotic factors in an ecosystem?

    Q: What are the abiotic and biotic factors in an ecosystem?

    A: Abiotic factors are the nonliving physical and chemical components of an ecosystem, while biotic factors are the living components of an ecosystem. Both types of factors affect reproduction and survival.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are the parts of a wave?

    Q: What are the parts of a wave?

    A: Transverse waves have two parts: a crest, which is the highest point of the wave, and the trough, which is the lowest part of the wave. Longitudinal waves also have two parts: compression, which are areas of high molecular density, and rarefactions, which are areas of low molecular density.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How do glaciers cause erosion?

    Q: How do glaciers cause erosion?

    A: Glaciers erode the land in three primary ways: plucking, abrasion and freeze-thaw. All three manners of erosion combine to make glaciers one of the world’s most powerful agents of erosion.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a grassland ecosystem?

    Q: What is a grassland ecosystem?

    A: A grassland ecosystem is the collection of plants, animals and micro-organisms that live within an environment where grasses are the primary form of vegetation. Examples of grassland ecosystems include the prairies of western North America, the Pampas of Argentina and the Russian steppes.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are some examples of ductile metals?

    Q: What are some examples of ductile metals?

    A: Gold and platinum are the most ductile metals on the periodic table of elements. Metals like copper, iron, nickel, manganese, silver, iridium, osmium, tungsten, tantalum, hafnium, rhenium, tin and zirconium can be drawn into very long wires. An ounce of gold can be drawn into a wire 50 miles long.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is an ice cap?

    Q: What is an ice cap?

    A: An ice cap is a glacier that covers less than 19,000 square miles. These miniature ice sheets form in polar and subpolar regions that are high in elevation and possess a relatively flat surface. Glacial ice that covers an area greater than 19,000 miles is known as an ice sheet.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are different types of tornadoes?

    Q: What are different types of tornadoes?

    A: There are six different types of tornadoes. The most commonly recognized type is the supercell tornado, the type that causes massive destruction. A gustnado is the opposite; it is very weak. It causes leaves and other debris to swirl around on the ground during a storm.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the hardest metal on Earth?

    Q: What is the hardest metal on Earth?

    A: Maraging steel is the hardest metal on Earth. This steel is an alloy of nickel, cobalt and molybdenum. Most of the hardest metals are not naturally occurring; instead, they are man-made alloys.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are man-made resources?

    Q: What are man-made resources?

    A: Man-made resources are items or substances that have value to human lives that do not occur in the natural world. Examples of man-made resources include plastic, paper, soda, sheet metal, rubber and brass. These contrast with natural resources, such as water, crops, sunlight, crude oil, wood and gold.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the average temperature of a swamp?

    Q: What is the average temperature of a swamp?

    A: The average temperature range of the world's swamps is between 15 C and 35 C. Swamps fall into two categories: swamp forests and shrub swamps. Bogs are not true swamps because they are not forested, but they are often mislabeled as such.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What causes global winds?

    Q: What causes global winds?

    A: Global winds refer to the pattern of air movement all around the globe, and they result from the fact that the Earth receives unequal heating from the sun. Not only does the tilt of the Earth's axis mean that different parts of the planet receive disparate amounts of sunlight, but the oceans and lands also heat at different rates. The imbalance in temperature makes heat move toward the poles, both in the wind and in ocean currents. When horizontal variances in air pressure take place as a result, wind occurs.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How are striations formed?

    Q: How are striations formed?

    A: Striations are a common feature of rocks that have once been overlain by a moving glacier. The scratches on the rock face are generally straight and all are oriented in the same direction, matching the downhill flow of the ice.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Can we stop the polar ice caps from melting?

    Q: Can we stop the polar ice caps from melting?

    A: Whether or not humankind can keep the polar ice caps from melting is a subject of great debate in which both side cite scientific studies that support their positions. The bulk of scientific and environmental organizations, however, believe that humans can slow or even halt the melting of polar ice caps and global warming by reducing the use of fossil fuels and other man-made chemicals.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: