Earth Science

A:

When hot and cold air meet, the warm air rises above the cool air, creating a low pressure zone. Warm air tends to cool as it reaches higher elevations, with the liquid in it condensing and forming clouds and rain. Cool air rushes in to fill the low pressure zone, pushing more warm air up and creating a cycle that can result in high winds and storms.

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  • What are different types of tornadoes?

    Q: What are different types of tornadoes?

    A: There are six different types of tornadoes. The most commonly recognized type is the supercell tornado, the type that causes massive destruction. A gustnado is the opposite; it is very weak. It causes leaves and other debris to swirl around on the ground during a storm.
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  • What is the Great Blue Hole?

    Q: What is the Great Blue Hole?

    A: The Great Blue Hole is an underwater sinkhole frequented by scuba divers for its numerous species of tropical fish and its clear blue waters. Measuring 984 feet across and 410 feet deep, it is located off the coast of Belize, about 62 miles away from Belize City.
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  • What is the hardest metal on Earth?

    Q: What is the hardest metal on Earth?

    A: Maraging steel is the hardest metal on Earth. This steel is an alloy of nickel, cobalt and molybdenum. Most of the hardest metals are not naturally occurring; instead, they are man-made alloys.
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  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of fires?

    Q: What are the advantages and disadvantages of fires?

    A: Fires can cause damage to property and homes, but they are also a crucial instrument that has helped man forge tools and keep predators at bay. Even though burns can cause severe injuries to the skin, fire has also helped man cook food.
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  • What is the coldest layer of the Earth's Atmosphere?

    Q: What is the coldest layer of the Earth's Atmosphere?

    A: Temperatures can reach lows of -90 degrees Celsius in the mesosphere, making it the coldest layer of the earth's atmosphere. The mesosphere extends above the stratosphere and ranges from 50 km to 87 km above the surface.
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  • What is a natural system?

    Q: What is a natural system?

    A: In the field of ecology, a natural system is one that exists in nature, independent of any human involvement. The natural system consists of all the physical and biological materials and their intertwined processes
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  • What is the Earth's revolution?

    Q: What is the Earth's revolution?

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  • How does distance from the sea affect temperature?

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  • What would happen if there were no trees on earth?

    Q: What would happen if there were no trees on earth?

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  • How many volcanoes does Hawai'i have?

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  • Can tornadoes be predicted?

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  • How does altitude affect temperature?

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  • What is the frost line depth in New York City?

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  • What is the average temperature of a swamp?

    Q: What is the average temperature of a swamp?

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  • What is ecological balance?

    Q: What is ecological balance?

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  • How do glaciers change the landscape?

    Q: How do glaciers change the landscape?

    A: Glaciers alter the landscape through erosion of the soil and rocks over which they pass. This erosion process leaves a vertical-walled valley similar to an amphitheater at the glacier's sources, according to Reference.com. As they travel through V-shaped valleys, glaciers transform the valley into a U-shape, grinding away cliffs and the bases of slopes. If the ocean fills these valleys, they become fjords.
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  • What are some interesting facts about the Hubbard Glacier?

    Q: What are some interesting facts about the Hubbard Glacier?

    A: The Hubbard Glacier is the largest tidewater glacier in North America. A tidewater glacier is one that flows into the ocean. The glacier is approximately 7 miles wide at its foot and 76 miles long. These measurements are constantly changing as the Hubbard Glacier continues to grow and move forward.
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  • What is collection in the water cycle?

    Q: What is collection in the water cycle?

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  • How are rift valleys formed?

    Q: How are rift valleys formed?

    A: Rift valleys form when tectonic forces deep underground exert a pulling force on the terrain. In areas where this occurs, the land splits into a steep-walled valley with a flat floor. Rift valleys can be very narrow, especially early in their formation.
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  • How many minutes of daylight do we gain each day?

    Q: How many minutes of daylight do we gain each day?

    A: In the month of January, between 1.5 to 2 minutes of daylight are gained each day. In February, about 2 1/2 minutes of daylight are gained each day.
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  • What is the difference between local winds and global winds?

    Q: What is the difference between local winds and global winds?

    A: The term global winds refers to the six major wind belts that encircle the globe. Local winds, however, are the winds, or breezes, that are stirred up by the temperatures and topographical features of a small region or area. This is especially true of coastal areas.
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