Earth Science

A:

Corrosion is a process by which a chemical reaction eats away at a metal. An example of a chemical reaction that causes corrosion is the oxidation of iron by water in an electrolytic process. The product of this reaction is rust.

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  • What technologies are used to explore deserts?

    Q: What technologies are used to explore deserts?

    A: Technologies used to explore deserts include robotic rovers, satellites, online mapping software and image-processing programs. NASA scientists use robotic rovers to explore deserts to prepare for the desert-like terrain located on Mars and the moon.
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  • What is deforestation?

    Q: What is deforestation?

    A: Deforestation is clearing away woodlands to use the cleared land for other uses. Deforestation happens to all types of woodland, including jungle and rain forest. The land is often used for farming or urban development.
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  • Why is a pothole called a pothole?

    Q: Why is a pothole called a pothole?

    A: The word "pothole" can be split into two distinct morphemes. The first part being "pot," a word derived from Middle English that means "a deep hole," and the second part being "hole," which maintains the same meaning today, that is, a hollowness in the ground.
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  • What is the difference between local winds and global winds?

    Q: What is the difference between local winds and global winds?

    A: The term global winds refers to the six major wind belts that encircle the globe. Local winds, however, are the winds, or breezes, that are stirred up by the temperatures and topographical features of a small region or area. This is especially true of coastal areas.
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  • What is the frost line depth in New York City?

    Q: What is the frost line depth in New York City?

    A: The average frost line depth in New York City is 36 inches. The frost line is the average depth in which the ground water in soil usually freezes. This is also referred to as "frost depth" or "freezing depth."
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  • What are the parts of a wave?

    Q: What are the parts of a wave?

    A: Transverse waves have two parts: a crest, which is the highest point of the wave, and the trough, which is the lowest part of the wave. Longitudinal waves also have two parts: compression, which are areas of high molecular density, and rarefactions, which are areas of low molecular density.
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  • How does the sun affect the Earth?

    Q: How does the sun affect the Earth?

    A: The sun provides the Earth with energy in the form of heat, which it uses to warm the Earth's surface, oceans and atmosphere. The heat energy found in the atmosphere is one of the major components of the Earth's climate and climate change, according to Windows to the Universe.
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  • What are the two main types of glaciers?

    Q: What are the two main types of glaciers?

    A: The two main types of glaciers are continental glaciers and alpine glaciers. Continental glaciers are also known as ice sheets because their form and flow are not significantly affected by underlying geographic formations. Alpine glaciers form on mountains and flow down mountain valleys.
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  • How many volcanoes does Hawai'i have?

    Q: How many volcanoes does Hawai'i have?

    A: Hawai'i has seven primary volcanoes, out of which three are currently active. The eight primary islands that make up the state of Hawai'i are part of a series of volcanoes.
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  • What Is a physical feature in geography?

    Q: What Is a physical feature in geography?

    A: Physical features in geography include bodies of water and landforms, for example, oceans, mountains, lakes, rivers, plateaus, plains, streams, hills, bays, gulfs, volcanoes, canyons, valleys and peninsulas are all various physical features. Anything that describes the Earth's topography is a physical feature.
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  • How are rift valleys formed?

    Q: How are rift valleys formed?

    A: Rift valleys form when tectonic forces deep underground exert a pulling force on the terrain. In areas where this occurs, the land splits into a steep-walled valley with a flat floor. Rift valleys can be very narrow, especially early in their formation.
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  • What is the smallest volcano in the world?

    Q: What is the smallest volcano in the world?

    A: Cuexcomate is considered the world's smallest volcano, with a diameter of 75 feet. Cuexcomate is located in a suburb of the city of Puebla, N.M. It is considered an inactive volcano.
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  • What is a natural system?

    Q: What is a natural system?

    A: In the field of ecology, a natural system is one that exists in nature, independent of any human involvement. The natural system consists of all the physical and biological materials and their intertwined processes
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  • What is the hardest metal on Earth?

    Q: What is the hardest metal on Earth?

    A: Maraging steel is the hardest metal on Earth. This steel is an alloy of nickel, cobalt and molybdenum. Most of the hardest metals are not naturally occurring; instead, they are man-made alloys.
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  • How are striations formed?

    Q: How are striations formed?

    A: Striations are a common feature of rocks that have once been overlain by a moving glacier. The scratches on the rock face are generally straight and all are oriented in the same direction, matching the downhill flow of the ice.
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  • How do humans affect the ecosystem?

    Q: How do humans affect the ecosystem?

    A: Human activity affects ecosystems in a wide variety of ways, but it primarily does so through agriculture, habitat destruction, water use and fishing. Whenever humans enter a habitat, they tend to reshape it to fit their own needs, destroying the resources that other animals use, which drives them out. The overuse of water drains natural aquifers and alters the local water table, and pollution can negatively affect wildlife populations.
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  • What are the abiotic and biotic factors in an ecosystem?

    Q: What are the abiotic and biotic factors in an ecosystem?

    A: Abiotic factors are the nonliving physical and chemical components of an ecosystem, while biotic factors are the living components of an ecosystem. Both types of factors affect reproduction and survival.
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  • What are the water cycle steps, in order?

    Q: What are the water cycle steps, in order?

    A: In order, the steps of the water cycle are evaporation, condensation, sublimation, precipitation, transpiration, runoff and infiltration. Together, all of the steps help regulate the Earth’s water supply and climate.
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  • What is the Great Blue Hole?

    Q: What is the Great Blue Hole?

    A: The Great Blue Hole is an underwater sinkhole frequented by scuba divers for its numerous species of tropical fish and its clear blue waters. Measuring 984 feet across and 410 feet deep, it is located off the coast of Belize, about 62 miles away from Belize City.
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  • Why is the Mississippi River important?

    Q: Why is the Mississippi River important?

    A: The Mississippi River is important due to its necessity in American commerce. Cities such as New Orleans, St. Louis and Minneapolis all get water from the river.
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  • What is the difference between high and low tides?

    Q: What is the difference between high and low tides?

    A: A high or low tide occurs based on where the highest or lowest part of the wave hits the shore. A high tide reaches further up on the shore than a low tide. Most coastal regions experience two high tides and two low tides every 24 hours and 50 minutes.
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