Earth Science

A:

An active volcano is one that has had at least one eruption in the past 10,000 years. An active volcano can be dormant or erupting.

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  • What is the Great Blue Hole?

    Q: What is the Great Blue Hole?

    A: The Great Blue Hole is an underwater sinkhole frequented by scuba divers for its numerous species of tropical fish and its clear blue waters. Measuring 984 feet across and 410 feet deep, it is located off the coast of Belize, about 62 miles away from Belize City.
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  • Can we stop the polar ice caps from melting?

    Q: Can we stop the polar ice caps from melting?

    A: Whether or not humankind can keep the polar ice caps from melting is a subject of great debate in which both side cite scientific studies that support their positions. The bulk of scientific and environmental organizations, however, believe that humans can slow or even halt the melting of polar ice caps and global warming by reducing the use of fossil fuels and other man-made chemicals.
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  • What are man-made resources?

    Q: What are man-made resources?

    A: Man-made resources are items or substances that have value to human lives that do not occur in the natural world. Examples of man-made resources include plastic, paper, soda, sheet metal, rubber and brass. These contrast with natural resources, such as water, crops, sunlight, crude oil, wood and gold.
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  • How many minutes of daylight do we gain each day?

    Q: How many minutes of daylight do we gain each day?

    A: In the month of January, between 1.5 to 2 minutes of daylight are gained each day. In February, about 2 1/2 minutes of daylight are gained each day.
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  • What are some interesting facts about the Hubbard Glacier?

    Q: What are some interesting facts about the Hubbard Glacier?

    A: The Hubbard Glacier is the largest tidewater glacier in North America. A tidewater glacier is one that flows into the ocean. The glacier is approximately 7 miles wide at its foot and 76 miles long. These measurements are constantly changing as the Hubbard Glacier continues to grow and move forward.
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  • How are striations formed?

    Q: How are striations formed?

    A: Striations are a common feature of rocks that have once been overlain by a moving glacier. The scratches on the rock face are generally straight and all are oriented in the same direction, matching the downhill flow of the ice.
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  • What is the average temperature of a swamp?

    Q: What is the average temperature of a swamp?

    A: The average temperature range of the world's swamps is between 15 C and 35 C. Swamps fall into two categories: swamp forests and shrub swamps. Bogs are not true swamps because they are not forested, but they are often mislabeled as such.
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  • Why is the Mississippi River important?

    Q: Why is the Mississippi River important?

    A: The Mississippi River is important due to its necessity in American commerce. Cities such as New Orleans, St. Louis and Minneapolis all get water from the river.
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  • Why are deserts hot in the day and cold at night?

    Q: Why are deserts hot in the day and cold at night?

    A: The heat that radiates from the sun and heats up the land begins to heat up the air and then escapes into the atmosphere due to the lack of clouds and humidity. This is the main reason that deserts can be hot during the day but cold during the night.
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  • What Is a physical feature in geography?

    Q: What Is a physical feature in geography?

    A: Physical features in geography include bodies of water and landforms, for example, oceans, mountains, lakes, rivers, plateaus, plains, streams, hills, bays, gulfs, volcanoes, canyons, valleys and peninsulas are all various physical features. Anything that describes the Earth's topography is a physical feature.
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  • What is an ice cap?

    Q: What is an ice cap?

    A: An ice cap is a glacier that covers less than 19,000 square miles. These miniature ice sheets form in polar and subpolar regions that are high in elevation and possess a relatively flat surface. Glacial ice that covers an area greater than 19,000 miles is known as an ice sheet.
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  • Why is a pothole called a pothole?

    Q: Why is a pothole called a pothole?

    A: The word "pothole" can be split into two distinct morphemes. The first part being "pot," a word derived from Middle English that means "a deep hole," and the second part being "hole," which maintains the same meaning today, that is, a hollowness in the ground.
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  • What is the frost line depth in New York City?

    Q: What is the frost line depth in New York City?

    A: The average frost line depth in New York City is 36 inches. The frost line is the average depth in which the ground water in soil usually freezes. This is also referred to as "frost depth" or "freezing depth."
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  • What does the term "environmental factors" mean?

    Q: What does the term "environmental factors" mean?

    A: Environmental factors refer to any element that might bring change to an existing environment. This include human factors such as litter that does not biodegrade, as well as such natural forces as the weather. One thing that is always true about the environment is that it is always in the state of change. Some of these shifts are easy to see, like an avalanche that happens on the side of a mountain as the result of traffic construction activity, while others are less obvious, such as sand finally becoming sandstone.
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  • What are the two main types of glaciers?

    Q: What are the two main types of glaciers?

    A: The two main types of glaciers are continental glaciers and alpine glaciers. Continental glaciers are also known as ice sheets because their form and flow are not significantly affected by underlying geographic formations. Alpine glaciers form on mountains and flow down mountain valleys.
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  • What is a natural system?

    Q: What is a natural system?

    A: In the field of ecology, a natural system is one that exists in nature, independent of any human involvement. The natural system consists of all the physical and biological materials and their intertwined processes
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  • What is the difference between high and low tides?

    Q: What is the difference between high and low tides?

    A: A high or low tide occurs based on where the highest or lowest part of the wave hits the shore. A high tide reaches further up on the shore than a low tide. Most coastal regions experience two high tides and two low tides every 24 hours and 50 minutes.
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  • What are types of natural calamities?

    Q: What are types of natural calamities?

    A: Types of natural calamities include hurricanes, earthquakes and tsunamis. Often, these calamities are connected such that one sets off another, as with earthquakes and tsunamis. Natural calamities are differentiated from human-made calamities, such as industrial accidents.
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  • Why is rain important?

    Q: Why is rain important?

    A: Many forms of land-based life depend on fresh water, which comes from rain. Humans depend on rain to fill aquifers. Rain also plays a role in shaping the landscape and bringing nutrients to the ocean.
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  • How does distance from the sea affect temperature?

    Q: How does distance from the sea affect temperature?

    A: Large bodies of water take longer to warm or cool than the land does, so coastal regions generally see lower temperatures during the summer and warmer temperatures during the winter than areas that are further inland. When warm air from the inland areas meets the cool sea air, moisture and water droplets form fog, which is far less common further from the sea.
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  • What is a person who studies rocks called?

    Q: What is a person who studies rocks called?

    A: A person who studies rocks is called a geologist. Geologists also study how the Earth is made and how the planet changes in time.
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