Constellations

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The constellation Pisces is made up of 21 main stars, according to Universe Today. The constellation is the 14th largest constellation, and contains as many as 86 minor stars and other deep-sky objects within its confines.

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  • How many stars make up Pegasus?

    Q: How many stars make up Pegasus?

    A: The constellation Pegasus contains at least 16 stars of magnitude 4 or brighter. Three of the four stars in the Great Square belong to Pegasus. Alpheratz, the star at the northeast corner of the square, was designated as the alpha star of the constellation Andromeda.
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  • What are the most famous constellations?

    Q: What are the most famous constellations?

    A: According to Sky-Watch, two of the most famous constellations are Ursa Major, the big bear, and Orion, the hunter. Ursa Major stands out because it contains the well-known Big Dipper. Orion is popular because it is near the equator and can be seen from any place on the planet.
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  • How big is a red giant star?

    Q: How big is a red giant star?

    A: A red giant star ranges from 62 million to 621 million miles in diameter, or 100 to 1,000 times the size of the sun. However, red giants have cooler temperatures than the sun because the energy travels over a larger surface area.
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  • Which star is the brightest?

    Q: Which star is the brightest?

    A: The brightest star visible from Earth is the sun. Though it is not exceptionally bright by the standards of other stars, its relative proximity to Earth makes it, by far, the brightest object in the sky, with an apparent magnitude of -26.74.
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  • How many stars are there in the Pisces constellation?

    Q: How many stars are there in the Pisces constellation?

    A: The constellation Pisces is made up of 21 main stars, according to Universe Today. The constellation is the 14th largest constellation, and contains as many as 86 minor stars and other deep-sky objects within its confines.
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  • How far is the constellation Gemini from Earth?

    Q: How far is the constellation Gemini from Earth?

    A: The constellation Gemini contains 85 major stars that vary in their distances from Earth. The closest star to Earth, Gliese 251, is around 17.99 light years from Earth.
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  • What is a pattern in the stars called?

    Q: What is a pattern in the stars called?

    A: A pattern in the stars is called a constellation. According to the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, the sky is divided into 88 official constellation groups. The constellation groups are referred to as asterisms.
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  • How many stars make up the Little Dipper?

    Q: How many stars make up the Little Dipper?

    A: The Little Dipper is made up of seven stars. Unfortunately, unless a person lives in an area of the world that is not blinded by city lights, seeing more than one or two may be impossible.
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  • How did the constellation Leo get its name?

    Q: How did the constellation Leo get its name?

    A: The word "Leo" means lion in Latin. The constellation originally represented the ferocious Nemean lion that Hercules strangled to death as one of his 12 labors. According to legend, Zeus was impressed enough to make both of them constellations. Leo is not just a constellation, but one of the 12 constellations that make up the Zodiac. Unlike many constellations, Leo does look something like the creature it depicts.
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  • What is the North Star?

    Q: What is the North Star?

    A: The North Star is another name for the star Polaris. It is called the North Star because its location in the Northern Hemisphere remains constant throughout the year as other stars seem to move around it.
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  • Can you see all the constellations at the equator?

    Q: Can you see all the constellations at the equator?

    A: An observer at the equator will see all of the constellations during the course of one year. The polar constellations Polaris and the Southern Cross appear near the horizon, while the rest pass overhead based on the season.
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  • Q: What is the temperature of the star Capella?

    A: While Capella appears to be a single star, it is actually a group of four stars that make up the sixth-brightest object in the night sky. The two stars that make up the brightest part of Capella have a surface temperature comparable to the Sun, about 4,900 degrees Kelvin.
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  • Q: What are some interesting facts about Cassiopeia?

    A: Some interesting facts about Cassiopeia are that she was the wife of Cepheus, the King of Ethiopia. Together, they were the parents of Andromeda, a girl known for her beauty. Cassiopeia was also a beautiful woman, but possessed of such vanity that she bragged that she was more beautiful than the Nereids. These sea nymphs were not only beautiful, but also the daughters of Nereus, a god of the sea.
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  • Q: How were the constellations created?

    A: The constellations, which reflect mankind's earliest efforts to attach representative significance to what was seen in the night sky, were physically formed at the same time as the billions of other stars, but began to be named according to the patterns seen in their respective groupings around 2000 B.C. Scorpio the scorpion and Leo the lion are two of the earliest known names given to star groups. The Greeks began to name and document constellations in earnest beginning around 500 B.C.
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  • Q: Where can you find star maps that show constellations?

    A: Star maps with constellations may be found on stargazing.net, astroviewer.com and stardate.org. Neave.com also offers an interactive online planetarium that includes constellations and can be customized to display images based on the user's location.
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  • Q: Who named the constellation Leo?

    A: The zodiac constellation Leo was catalogued along with 47 other constellations in "Almagest" by the famous Greco-Egyptian astronomer Claudius Ptolemy in the second century AD. Many ancient cultures recognized the constellation, referring to it as "the lion" in their languages due to the shape formed when connecting its stars.
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  • Q: Who discovered the Scorpius constellation?

    A: The discovery of the Scorpius constellation is credited to the famous Greco-Egyptian astronomer Claudius Ptolemy. He documented it in the 2nd century CE. However, civilizations predating the Greeks may have known about Scorpius. Roughly 3,000 years before Ptolemy, it was known as "The Scorpion" by the Babylonians.
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  • Q: How did the constellation Pegasus get its name?

    A: The constellation Pegasus was named after the winged horse of Greek mythology. He sprang from the blood of the Gorgon Medusa after she was slain by Perseus. Zeus, the chief god, placed the horse in the night sky among other demigods and heroes.
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  • Q: Where can you view astronomy star charts?

    A: Stargazers can view astronomy star charts on sites such as SkyandTelescope.com, download printable star charts at sites such as PBS.org and install star chart software from Stellarium.org. Star charts are also available for purchase at sites such as SkyMaps.com.
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  • Q: Where did constellations come from?

    A: Constellations came from the imaginations of people who looked up at the stars and saw patterns that they ascribed to their gods, goddesses, heroes and figures from their mythologies. Although scientists don't know who the very first people to set up constellations were, there are indications that at least a handful of constellations were in place as early as 4000 B.C.
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  • Q: What are 5 facts about the constellation Ursa Major?

    A: Five facts about Ursa Major are: it is also known as the Great Bear, it is the largest constellation in the sky, it has a companion constellation known as Ursa Minor, the body and tail are part of the Big Dipper and most of Ursa Major is circumpolar. Circumpolar means that the constellation can be seen all year long.
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