Chemistry

A:

All physical objects, such as stars, books, people, animals, plants and the sea, are examples of matter. Matter is any physical object that occupies space and has mass.

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  • What Happens When Wood Burns?

    Q: What Happens When Wood Burns?

    A: According to the European Chemistry Thematic Network, wood reacts with oxygen when it burns. The combustion of wood produces carbon dioxide and water, which are reaction products released as gases into the atmosphere.
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  • What Are Some Other Names for Formaldehyde?

    Q: What Are Some Other Names for Formaldehyde?

    A: Formaldehyde can also be known as methanal, which is the substance's systematic name, or by alternate names like methyl aldehyde, methylene glycol or methylene oxide. This chemical compound is the simplest member of the aldehyde functional group and has a chemical formula of CH2O or HCHO. Though it is a gas at room temperature, formaldehyde solutions are used in the preservation of biological specimens and as a disinfectant.
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  • What Happens When Iron Reacts With Oxygen?

    Q: What Happens When Iron Reacts With Oxygen?

    A: Iron rusts when it comes in contact with oxygen and water. It rusts faster in acid rain and salty water. Both oxygen and water are necessary for rusting, which is an oxidation reaction.
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  • What Is the Law of Octaves?

    Q: What Is the Law of Octaves?

    A: The Law of Octaves is about the patterns of elements in the Periodic Table, stating that when elements are aligned according to their atomic weight, every eighth element shares similar properties. For example, hydrogen, fluorine, chlorine, bromine and iodine are all on the same interval.
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  • What Are the Uses of Copper?

    Q: What Are the Uses of Copper?

    A: Copper is commonly used in construction, electrical wiring, plumbing and the manufacture of vehicles. It is also used to make parts for fixtures in homes.
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  • At What Temperature Does Diesel Fuel Solidify?

    Q: At What Temperature Does Diesel Fuel Solidify?

    A: Diesel fuel solidifies, or gels, at temperatures around 15 degrees Fahrenheit (-9 degrees Celsius). The gel point temperature is higher for biodiesel.
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  • Does Brass Rust?

    Q: Does Brass Rust?

    A: Brass does not rust. Only iron and its alloys, such as steel, rust. Pure brass contains no iron and is resistant to corrosion. Brass can develop a red or green tarnish that may resemble rust.
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  • How Does Magnesium React With Oxygen?

    Q: How Does Magnesium React With Oxygen?

    A: Magnesium has a very energetic combustion reaction with oxygen, where two atoms of magnesium bond with one molecule of oxygen gas to form two molecules of magnesium oxide. This reaction is extremely exothermic, releasing a great deal of heat and light, which is why magnesium fuses are used to initiate reactions such as the thermite reaction, and magnesium is used in flares for high visibility. The reaction of magnesium to oxygen is so energetically favorable that burning magnesium can steal the oxygen from both water and carbon dioxide, making these common methods of dousing flames ineffective to stop magnesium combustion.
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  • What Is SiO2?

    Q: What Is SiO2?

    A: Silicon dioxide, or SiO2, is commonly known as sand or quartz. It exists naturally in Earth's crust. It also exists in the biology of plants, animals and water.
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  • What Is the Role of Chemistry in Society?

    Q: What Is the Role of Chemistry in Society?

    A: Chemistry is a broad scientific field, and its relevance is seen in almost every aspect of society, including medicine, cooking, environmental processes, cleaning and manufacturing goods. Class notes from the Department of Chemistry at Michigan State University state that the Chemical Age is one of the great three ages of the 20th century, the others being the Nuclear Age and the Electronic Age.
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  • What Is a Practical Application of Boyle's Law?

    Q: What Is a Practical Application of Boyle's Law?

    A: One practical application of Boyle's law is drawing fluid into a syringe. Pulling back on the plunger increases the interior volume of the syringe and reduces its pressure. The fluid outside the syringe is sucked into the barrel until the interior and exterior pressure are balanced.
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  • What Is the Normal Phase of Gold?

    Q: What Is the Normal Phase of Gold?

    A: At normal room temperature, about 70 degrees Fahrenheit, gold exists in a solid phase. It is classified as a metal and must be heated to extreme temperatures to transform into a gas or liquid. It is a soft metal and is extremely malleable and ductile. Because it is so malleable, it is often added to other metals like silver or platinum to create an alloy that is more durable.
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  • Why Do Metals Rust?

    Q: Why Do Metals Rust?

    A: Many metals oxidize and corrode, but rust, or iron oxide, is specific to ferrous metals such as steel. Rust is formed when oxygen bonds with an atom of iron to form an iron oxide molecule. This molecule is considerably larger than the surrounding iron molecules, so it quickly becomes dislodged and flakes off the surface. This exposes fresh metal that can also rust.
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  • What Are the Advantages of Chemical Energy?

    Q: What Are the Advantages of Chemical Energy?

    A: Chemical energy is abundant, easily combustible and has high efficiency. It does have its disadvantages, as it is also sometimes harmful to the environment and humans and tends to be non-renewable.
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  • What Happens When You Put Celery in Saltwater?

    Q: What Happens When You Put Celery in Saltwater?

    A: When celery is placed in salt water, the portion of the celery stalk placed in the salt water becomes soft, limp and mushy. The celery loses its firmness.
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  • What Is Anomalous Expansion of Water?

    Q: What Is Anomalous Expansion of Water?

    A: The anomalous expansion of water is an abnormal property of water whereby it expands instead of contracting when the temperature goes from 4oC to 0oC, and it becomes less dense. The density becomes less and less as it freezes because molecules of water normally form open crystal structures when in solid form.
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  • What Is Tocopheryl Acetate?

    Q: What Is Tocopheryl Acetate?

    A: Tocopheryl Acetate is vitamin E. Other scientific names for this powerful antioxidant include Alfacol, Ecofrol, Tofaxin, Ephynal acetate, Econ, alpha-Tocopherol acetate and Tokoferol acetate, according to the National Library of Medicine.
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  • What Is Plastic Made Of?

    Q: What Is Plastic Made Of?

    A: Most plastics are made from oil. Oil is a long-chain hydrocarbon, meaning that it is composed of long chains of carbon molecules. These long chains of carbon molecules give plastic its characteristic strength and flexibility.
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  • Why Are Alloys Used?

    Q: Why Are Alloys Used?

    A: Alloys mix metals with other elements to help harden and otherwise make them more useful. For example, gold is too soft to make good jewelry on its own, but it can be mixed with other elements, including harder metals like zinc and nickel, to help make it strong enough to be formed into rings and other jewelry pieces.
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  • What Is Coal Made Of?

    Q: What Is Coal Made Of?

    A: Coal is a sedentary rock that varies in composition. It forms as organic material compressed under the layers of soil and more organic material above it.
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  • What Is the Definition of "crude Protein"?

    Q: What Is the Definition of "crude Protein"?

    A: Crude protein is a term for the total protein content of a food source as determined by its nitrogen content. The term is most often used in scientific testing and on the labels of pet foods.
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