Chemistry

A:

Salt that is used for a variety of industrial and food-related purposes comes primarily from shallow bodies of sea or mineral water and from mining operations dedicated to salt production. The method of production is determined by the location from which the salt is harvested. Location and method also determine the type of salt sold as a final product as well as its intended use.

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  • What is the composition of pure air?

    Q: What is the composition of pure air?

    A: By volume, dry air is 78.09 percent nitrogen and 20.95 percent oxygen, accounting for over 99 percent of the total volume. The remaining 1 percent is made up of argon, carbon dioxide, neon, methane, helium, krypton, hydrogen, xenon, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, iodine and trace amounts of carbon monoxide and ammonia.
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  • What happens during a chemical change?

    Q: What happens during a chemical change?

    A: Alterations to the electron-based ionic or covalent bonds between ions or atoms happen during a chemical change. Such changes result in one or more new substances with different physical and chemical properties. This type of change stands in contrast to physical changes which, despite sometimes closely resembling chemical changes, only produce a change in physical properties.
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  • What is the lethal dose of radiation?

    Q: What is the lethal dose of radiation?

    A: According to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the lethal dose of radiation is in the range of 400 to 450 rem. This level of radiation causes death to around 50 percent of a population that has been exposed over a period of 30 days.
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  • What substances make up crude oil?

    Q: What substances make up crude oil?

    A: Crude oil mainly consists of hydrocarbon molecules, but impurities, such as sulfur, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, arsenic, vanadium, copper, nickel, sodium chloride, calcium chloride and magnesium chloride, are also present. The hydrocarbon molecules include straight chains, branched chains and rings.
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  • What is the cost of the element mercury?

    Q: What is the cost of the element mercury?

    A: As of 2014, the element mercury costs between $2,950 and $3,075 per flask. A flask is equivalent to 76 pounds.
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  • What did Dmitri Mendeleev discover in 1869?

    Q: What did Dmitri Mendeleev discover in 1869?

    A: In 1869, Dmitri Mendeleev discovered how to classify elements into a periodic table. Although other scientists had been trying to find a way to classify the elements, Mendeleev's version was the clearest and most systematic.
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  • What did Louis Pasteur do?

    Q: What did Louis Pasteur do?

    A: Louis Pasteur was a scientist who developed important vaccines and came up with the process of pasteurization for foods. He is credited with discoveries that laid the foundation for the study of microbiology and modern medicine.
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  • What is the most reactive metal in the periodic table?

    Q: What is the most reactive metal in the periodic table?

    A: The most reactive metal in the periodic table is francium. Francium belongs to the alkali metals, a group on the periodic table whose members are all highly reactive. These metals are highly reactive because they all have only one valence electron.
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  • What is a practical application of Boyle's law?

    Q: What is a practical application of Boyle's law?

    A: One practical application of Boyle's law is drawing fluid into a syringe. Pulling back on the plunger increases the interior volume of the syringe and reduces its pressure. The fluid outside the syringe is sucked into the barrel until the interior and exterior pressure are balanced.
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  • Is citric acid soluble in water?

    Q: Is citric acid soluble in water?

    A: Citric acid is soluble in water to a great degree. In water of a temperature of 212 degrees Fahrenheit, 84 percent of the citric acid added to the solution is dissolved.
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  • What are inorganic substances?

    Q: What are inorganic substances?

    A: Most inorganic compounds do not contain carbon; however, in those inorganic substances that do contain carbon, carbon-hydrogen bonds are absent. Organic compounds always contain carbon and almost all have carbon-hydrogen bonds, according to About.com
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  • Where does iridium come from?

    Q: Where does iridium come from?

    A: Iridium is an element that originates in the stars. A supernova event is responsible for the creation of this element and it does not occur as a result of fusion.
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  • What happens when iron reacts with oxygen?

    Q: What happens when iron reacts with oxygen?

    A: Iron rusts when it comes in contact with oxygen and water. It rusts faster in acid rain and salty water. Both oxygen and water are necessary for rusting, which is an oxidation reaction.
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  • Is methane gas harmful to humans?

    Q: Is methane gas harmful to humans?

    A: Methane gas is not considered dangerous to humans by inhalation. Exposure to methane gas in air with low oxygen levels may cause dizziness, headaches and a feeling of fatigue with no lethal effects.
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  • What is the pH of pure water?

    Q: What is the pH of pure water?

    A: At 77 degrees Fahrenheit, the pH of pure water is approximately 7. The pH value describes the acidity or basicity of an aqueous solution. Acids have pH values of less than 7 while bases have pH values greater than 7. A pH value of 7 is neutral.
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  • Is aluminum soluble in water?

    Q: Is aluminum soluble in water?

    A: Aluminum is insoluble in water. In addition, aluminum oxide and aluminum hydroxide, the predominate aluminum salts are considered insoluble in water. However, seawater contains between 0.013 and 5 parts per billion of aluminum.
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  • What are some examples of petrochemicals?

    Q: What are some examples of petrochemicals?

    A: Petrochemicals are organic chemicals made from crude oil and natural gas for use in industrial processes. Examples of primary petrochemicals include methanol, ethylene, propylene, butadiene, benzene, toluene and xylene. Roughly five percent of the world's annual oil supply is utilized to make petrochemicals. These organic substances are used to make plastics, medicines, furniture, appliances, solar panels, PVC pipes, bulletproof vests, consumer electronics, wind turbines and automobile parts.
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  • What is sodium used for?

    Q: What is sodium used for?

    A: Sodium is used to create industrial and manufacturing compounds and is also a common additive in salts, baking soda and baking powder. Sodium is unique in that it is a mineral with nutritional and economic benefits. Sodium is essential for humans and other organisms and is also a key ingredient in many compounds, such as sodium compounds.
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  • What does arsenic look like?

    Q: What does arsenic look like?

    A: Arsenic is a gray or yellow crystalline that often looks like a jagged rock when it is in its natural state. It is typically somewhat shiny, resembling silver.
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  • What is the use of chloroxylenol in Dettol antiseptic liquid?

    Q: What is the use of chloroxylenol in Dettol antiseptic liquid?

    A: The chloroxylenol in Dettol is an antimicrobial disinfectant used to kill bacteria and to prevent infections on minor scrapes, cuts or burns. The substance is commonly found in antibacterial soaps, but it is also used to control bacteria, algae and fungi on industrial surfaces where clean facilities are needed. Some liquids that contain chloroxylenol must be diluted before application on the human body.
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  • Is silicon a metal or nonmetal?

    Q: Is silicon a metal or nonmetal?

    A: Silicon is a metalloid, which means it is a type of metal but has some nonmetal qualities depending on what element it is reacting with. An example of this would be the fact that silicon is not a good conductor of electricity.
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