Chemistry

A:

The temperature of a blue flame depends on what is on fire. A burning chemical or metal may display a blue color only after reaching a particular temperature, but that threshold can vary.

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  • What Is Silicon Dioxide?

    Q: What Is Silicon Dioxide?

    A: Silicon dioxide, or silica, is a chemical compound that is the main component of sand, glass and quartz. By processing sand at high temperatures, glass is formed. Sand, and therefore glass, may also contain other minerals.
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  • What Is the Red Liquid in a Thermometer?

    Q: What Is the Red Liquid in a Thermometer?

    A: The red liquid inside of a thermometer is alcohol. When the temperature changes, the alcohol expands, providing a reading based on the thermometer's scale. Red dye is used to color the clear alcohol so that someone is able to easily read the thermometer.
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  • How Much Mercury Is There in a Thermometer?

    Q: How Much Mercury Is There in a Thermometer?

    A: The amount of mercury in a thermometer is about 3 grams. A mercury thermometer is used to measure the body temperature.
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  • What Is the Molar Mass of Caffeine?

    Q: What Is the Molar Mass of Caffeine?

    A: The molar mass of caffeine is 194 grams per mole. It has a chemical structure of C8H10N4O2. It is considered a stimulant drug. Caffeine is found naturally in many seeds, leaves and fruits of plants, plus it is artificially added to many beverages and food items for consumers.
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  • What Does "alchemist" Mean?

    Q: What Does "alchemist" Mean?

    A: An alchemist is someone who practices alchemy. Alchemy is a form of science dating back to medieval times that concentrates on chemical science and speculative philosophy. It is also used to explain mysterious transformations.
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  • What Happens When Metals React With Acids?

    Q: What Happens When Metals React With Acids?

    A: While exploring what happens when metals come in contact with acids, it is apparent that most, but not all, have some sort of reaction, usually forming hydrogen gas. The result is the production of salts.
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  • What Is the Reaction Between Chalk and Vinegar?

    Q: What Is the Reaction Between Chalk and Vinegar?

    A: The reaction between chalk and vinegar is a neutralization reaction between calcium carbonate and acetic acid to produce water, carbon dioxide and calcium acetate. Carbon dioxide is a gas that causes the reaction to bubble.
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  • Where Does Plutonium Come From?

    Q: Where Does Plutonium Come From?

    A: Plutonium naturally forms in the heart of a star undergoing supernova, along with virtually all of the heavy elements in the universe. It is not found on Earth due to its instability. The most stable isotope of naturally occurring plutonium has a half-life of only 82,000,000 years and is exhausted well before it can be taken up in planetary formation. However, humans have been able to artificially create plutonium.
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  • How Is Carbon Stored in the Biosphere?

    Q: How Is Carbon Stored in the Biosphere?

    A: Carbon is stored in the biosphere within living or recently dead plants, animals and microorganisms in the ocean and on land. Forests contain 86 percent of the planet's carbon on top of the ground. This biomass is released into the carbon cycle through natural decomposition and respiration.
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  • Is Silicon a Metal or Nonmetal?

    Q: Is Silicon a Metal or Nonmetal?

    A: Silicon is a metalloid, which means it is a type of metal but has some nonmetal qualities depending on what element it is reacting with. An example of this would be the fact that silicon is not a good conductor of electricity.
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  • What Metals Are Used to Make Solder?

    Q: What Metals Are Used to Make Solder?

    A: Solder alloys are made from a mixture of tin, lead, brass and silver. Solder made from tin and lead has a lower melting point, while brass and silver are used to create an alloy able to withstand higher temperatures.
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  • What Is the Density of Rubber?

    Q: What Is the Density of Rubber?

    A: The density of rubber is dependent upon the kind of rubber; hard rubber has a density of 74 lb/foot cubed, while soft commercial rubber has a density of 69 lb/foot cubed and pure gum rubber has a density of 57-58 lb/foot cubed. The term "rubber" has had many meanings over the years, including as a reference to a horse towel in 1598 and a polished brick in 1744 before it came to mean the elastic substance used today.
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  • What Are Properties in Science?

    Q: What Are Properties in Science?

    A: In chemistry, the term "property" is frequently used to describe the attributes of a substance, such as density, oxidation, state of matter, mass, conductivity, color, bonding and many other traits. These properties are used to understand how a substance behaves in different situations.
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  • Why Does Sugar Dissolve Faster in Hot Tea Than in Iced Tea?

    Q: Why Does Sugar Dissolve Faster in Hot Tea Than in Iced Tea?

    A: Sugar dissolves more quickly in hot tea than in iced tea because the solubility of solutes in solvents generally increases with an increase in temperature, according to Rutgers University. The heat provides energy to break the molecular bonds in the solid, causing it to dissolve faster.
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  • Where Was Tin Discovered?

    Q: Where Was Tin Discovered?

    A: No one is completely sure about the specific time or location of the discovery of tin because it was discovered very long ago. Tools, weapons and figures made of metals including tin have been found and dated as far back as the year 3,000 B.C.
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  • What Is the Concept of Homeostasis?

    Q: What Is the Concept of Homeostasis?

    A: Homeostasis is the ability of an organism to maintain a stable, constant internal environment, even when the external environment changes. Humans maintain homeostasis in processes such as controlling temperature, blood pressure and respiration as well as maintaining a balance in pH and electrolytes.
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  • What Is an Example of a Solute?

    Q: What Is an Example of a Solute?

    A: A solute is a substance that can be dissolved in a fluid. One common example of a solute is ordinary table salt, or NaCl. Salt dissolves readily in water, which acts as the solvent.
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  • What Are Some Everyday Uses for Bromine?

    Q: What Are Some Everyday Uses for Bromine?

    A: Bromine is used in everyday products such as pesticides and water treatment solutions. Bromine is a reddish-brown gas that has a pungent smell and can irritate the skin, nose and eyes. Bromine was discovered in 1826 by A.J. Balard.
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  • What Are the Two Main Types of Fermentation?

    Q: What Are the Two Main Types of Fermentation?

    A: The two main types of fermentation are alcoholic and lactic. In alcoholic fermentation molecules are converted into ethanol with the production of carbon dioxide, whereas in lactic fermentation, molecules are converted into lactic acid, and there is no production of carbon dioxide.
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  • What Substances Act As Natural Buffers?

    Q: What Substances Act As Natural Buffers?

    A: According to a 1963 study at Harvard University, carbon dioxide, bicarbonate and carbonate act as buffers to fluctuating hydrogen ion concentrations in natural sources of unprocessed water, helping the water maintain a relatively constant pH. Since the concentrations of buffer chemicals are low, outside forces also influence water pH.
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  • Is It Possible for Kerosene to Go Bad?

    Q: Is It Possible for Kerosene to Go Bad?

    A: Stored kerosene can go bad. When kerosene is being stored, condensation can seep into the container and cause a problem. Sludge can develop from the mold and bacteria within the kerosene, and that causes it to break down.
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