Chemistry

A:

Water has numerous physical properties, including the color, surface tension and adhesion. There are far more physical properties than chemical properties. This is partially due to water taking so many forms, such as ice or steam; each form of water has different properties.

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  • What is the viscosity of water?

    Q: What is the viscosity of water?

    A: The viscosity of water is 1.0020 millipascal seconds at 20°C. The viscosity of water, and other substances, can change with a difference in temperature. Water has low viscosity compared to other fluids.
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  • Where is iodine found in the world?

    Q: Where is iodine found in the world?

    A: Oceans are one of the world's greatest sources of iodine. Iodine can also be found in other salty waters, such as brines found near oil deposits. China, Japan, Russia and Chile are some of the top global producers of iodine.
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  • What does arsenic look like?

    Q: What does arsenic look like?

    A: Arsenic is a gray or yellow crystalline that often looks like a jagged rock when it is in its natural state. It is typically somewhat shiny, resembling silver.
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  • What are some common ionic compounds that are used in everyday life?

    Q: What are some common ionic compounds that are used in everyday life?

    A: One of the more common ionic compounds that is used often is baking soda. Baking soda is also known as bicarbonate or hydrogen carbonate.
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  • What is a pure substance in science?

    Q: What is a pure substance in science?

    A: A pure substance is any single type of material that has not been contaminated by another substance. Water is considered a pure substance if the water contains only hydrogen and oxygen.
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  • What are the advantages of chemical energy?

    Q: What are the advantages of chemical energy?

    A: Chemical energy is abundant, easily combustible and has high efficiency. It does have its disadvantages, as it is also sometimes harmful to the environment and humans and tends to be non-renewable.
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  • What happens if the world runs out of helium?

    Q: What happens if the world runs out of helium?

    A: At today's rate in 2015, the world will run out of helium in 25 to 30 years, and that means much more than losing birthday balloons. Helium is critical to operating medical equipment, electronics and even NASA technology. The trouble is that once helium is used, it's gone, and there is a limited supply on Earth.
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  • What is silicone made of?

    Q: What is silicone made of?

    A: Silicone is made of a chain of alternating silicon and oxygen atoms with two other atoms or compounds bonded to each silicon atom. Its structure is somewhat similar to a hydrocarbon chain, in part because of silicon being part of the same periodic group. However, bonds between silicon atoms, unlike bonds between carbon atoms, are unstable. Silicone, on the other hand, is very stable and resists both heat and chemicals.
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  • What does iodine look like?

    Q: What does iodine look like?

    A: Solid iodine consists of shiny bluish-black crystals, but iodine vapors are a purple gas. Iodine is named after the appearance of the iodine vapors, as "iodes" is the Greek word for purple.
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  • What is the meaning of industrial chemistry?

    Q: What is the meaning of industrial chemistry?

    A: Industrial chemistry is concerned with using chemical and physical processes to transform raw materials into products that are beneficial to humanity. This includes the manufacture of basic chemicals to produce products for various industries. Industrial chemistry can be thought of as an industry that generates synthetic replacements for natural products.
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  • How did nickel get its name?

    Q: How did nickel get its name?

    A: The element nickel is named after the devil. "Nickel" is an anglicized version of "kupfernickel," which is German for "Old Nick's copper." Old Nick is an archaic German term for Satan.
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  • What are the uses of copper?

    Q: What are the uses of copper?

    A: Copper is commonly used in construction, electrical wiring, plumbing and the manufacture of vehicles. It is also used to make parts for fixtures in homes.
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  • Why do metals rust?

    Q: Why do metals rust?

    A: Many metals oxidize and corrode, but rust, or iron oxide, is specific to ferrous metals such as steel. Rust is formed when oxygen bonds with an atom of iron to form an iron oxide molecule. This molecule is considerably larger than the surrounding iron molecules, so it quickly becomes dislodged and flakes off the surface. This exposes fresh metal that can also rust.
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  • Is citric acid soluble in water?

    Q: Is citric acid soluble in water?

    A: Citric acid is soluble in water to a great degree. In water of a temperature of 212 degrees Fahrenheit, 84 percent of the citric acid added to the solution is dissolved.
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  • What color is sodium?

    Q: What color is sodium?

    A: The element sodium has a silvery-white color. It is a very common element on earth and accounts for more than 2 percent of the planet's crust.
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  • What is the melting temperature of steel?

    Q: What is the melting temperature of steel?

    A: Steel, an alloy of iron, carbon and small amounts of other metals, melts at approximately 1370 degrees Celsius. Because the exact chemical composition of different steel alloys varies, the melting point differs slightly depending on its grade.
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  • Are elements named after people?

    Q: Are elements named after people?

    A: Many different elements are named after people. Some are named after the scientist who discovered the element, while others are named in honor of a famous or noteworthy person.
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  • Is there an element named after a cleaning compound?

    Q: Is there an element named after a cleaning compound?

    A: Strictly speaking, no element is named for a cleaning compound. Boron, however, is derived from the Arabic and Persian words for borax, the compound in which it's often found. Borax is a common component in many abrasives and other cleansers.
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  • What happens during a chemical change?

    Q: What happens during a chemical change?

    A: Alterations to the electron-based ionic or covalent bonds between ions or atoms happen during a chemical change. Such changes result in one or more new substances with different physical and chemical properties. This type of change stands in contrast to physical changes which, despite sometimes closely resembling chemical changes, only produce a change in physical properties.
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  • What does hydrochloric acid do?

    Q: What does hydrochloric acid do?

    A: Hydrochloric acid does many different things, finding use in both the home and factories. Hydrochloric acid is an aqueous solution of hydrogen chloride. Muriatic is a common name for this highly corrosive mineral acid.
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  • What is the normal phase of gold?

    Q: What is the normal phase of gold?

    A: At normal room temperature, about 70 degrees Fahrenheit, gold exists in a solid phase. It is classified as a metal and must be heated to extreme temperatures to transform into a gas or liquid. It is a soft metal and is extremely malleable and ductile. Because it is so malleable, it is often added to other metals like silver or platinum to create an alloy that is more durable.
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