Chemistry

A:

All physical objects, such as stars, books, people, animals, plants and the sea, are examples of matter. Matter is any physical object that occupies space and has mass.

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  • What Metals Are Used to Make Stainless Steel?

    Q: What Metals Are Used to Make Stainless Steel?

    A: Stainless steel is an alloy containing at least 11.5 percent chromium and at least 50 percent iron. Additional components are nickel, carbon, manganese, silicon and nitrogen. The amount of each component is varied according to the desired use.
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  • Is It Possible for Kerosene to Go Bad?

    Q: Is It Possible for Kerosene to Go Bad?

    A: Stored kerosene can go bad. When kerosene is being stored, condensation can seep into the container and cause a problem. Sludge can develop from the mold and bacteria within the kerosene, and that causes it to break down.
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  • What Is the Difference Between Starch and Glycogen?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Starch and Glycogen?

    A: The key difference is that starch is converted by plants while glycogen is converted by animals. However, both starch and glycogen are polysaccharide polymers of alpha glucose.
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  • What Is a Quarter Stick of Dynamite?

    Q: What Is a Quarter Stick of Dynamite?

    A: A quarter stick of dynamite has an average size of 1 inch in diameter and 6 inches in length. It is made with thick cardboard walls and filled with explosive powder. A quarter stick, which is also called an M-1000, is usually used as a firecracker.
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  • Why Does Water Evaporate?

    Q: Why Does Water Evaporate?

    A: Water evaporates because individual water molecules break free of the bonds that hold them all together as a liquid. While water evaporates more in heat, it is possible for it to evaporate in cold conditions.
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  • What Factors Affect the Solubility of a Substance?

    Q: What Factors Affect the Solubility of a Substance?

    A: Temperature, pressure and substance composition can impact the solubility of a substance. Reactions between solutes and solvents can decrease the solubility of a substance as well.
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  • What Are Some Examples of Petrochemicals?

    Q: What Are Some Examples of Petrochemicals?

    A: Petrochemicals are organic chemicals made from crude oil and natural gas for use in industrial processes. Examples of primary petrochemicals include methanol, ethylene, propylene, butadiene, benzene, toluene and xylene. Roughly five percent of the world's annual oil supply is utilized to make petrochemicals. These organic substances are used to make plastics, medicines, furniture, appliances, solar panels, PVC pipes, bulletproof vests, consumer electronics, wind turbines and automobile parts.
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  • What Is a Pure Substance in Science?

    Q: What Is a Pure Substance in Science?

    A: A pure substance is any single type of material that has not been contaminated by another substance. Water is considered a pure substance if the water contains only hydrogen and oxygen.
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  • What Did Dmitri Mendeleev Discover in 1869?

    Q: What Did Dmitri Mendeleev Discover in 1869?

    A: In 1869, Dmitri Mendeleev discovered how to classify elements into a periodic table. Although other scientists had been trying to find a way to classify the elements, Mendeleev's version was the clearest and most systematic.
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  • How Did Nickel Get Its Name?

    Q: How Did Nickel Get Its Name?

    A: The element nickel is named after the devil. "Nickel" is an anglicized version of "kupfernickel," which is German for "Old Nick's copper." Old Nick is an archaic German term for Satan.
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  • What Is the Boiling Point of Oil?

    Q: What Is the Boiling Point of Oil?

    A: Oils used in food preparation have a range of boiling points, from about 375 F to about 510 F. The boiling point of oil depends upon the specific type of oil that is being heated as well as its specific purity. Crude oil subjected to refining involves a spectrum of different boiling points to extract the various elements comprising it.
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  • Is Water an Element, Compound or Mixture?

    Q: Is Water an Element, Compound or Mixture?

    A: Water is a compound made of two atoms of hydrogen and one atom of oxygen. The hydrogen atoms are bonded to the oxygen atom by the sharing of electrons, called a covalent bond.
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  • What Is the Boiling Point of Sodium?

    Q: What Is the Boiling Point of Sodium?

    A: Sodium has a boiling point of 883 degrees Celsius or 1621 degrees Fahrenheit. It has a melting point of 97.72 degrees Celsius or 207.9 degrees Fahrenheit.
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  • What Is the Atomic Theory?

    Q: What Is the Atomic Theory?

    A: The atomic theory is that all matter is made up of tiny units or particles called atoms. This theory describes the characteristics, structure and behavior of atoms as well as the components that make up atoms. Furthermore, the theory states that all elements are made up of identical atoms.
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  • Is Aluminum Soluble in Water?

    Q: Is Aluminum Soluble in Water?

    A: Aluminum is insoluble in water. In addition, aluminum oxide and aluminum hydroxide, the predominate aluminum salts are considered insoluble in water. However, seawater contains between 0.013 and 5 parts per billion of aluminum.
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  • What Is Matter Made Of?

    Q: What Is Matter Made Of?

    A: Matter is made of single particles called atoms and is any substance that has either mass or volume. Matter can exist in three states, either as a solid, a liquid or a gas.
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  • What Are the Uses of Iodine?

    Q: What Are the Uses of Iodine?

    A: According to WebMD, iodine is commonly used to prevent iodine deficiency and disinfect wounds. It can also be used to protect against radiation, treat ulcers and purify water.
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  • How Was the Proton Discovered?

    Q: How Was the Proton Discovered?

    A: The proton was discovered by Ernest Rutherford through the gold foil experiment, says the Purdue University College of Science. The results of the experiment led Rutherford to conclude that the positive charge and the mass of an atom are concentrated in a tiny fraction of the overall volume. In 1920, Rutherford proposed that the positively charged particle in an atom’s nucleus be called a proton.
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  • What Is Produced by Meiosis?

    Q: What Is Produced by Meiosis?

    A: Meiosis is a type of cell division that reduces the number of chromosomes in the parent cell. Meiosis produces four gamete cells. Meiosis is required to produce egg and sperm cells for sexual reproduction.
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  • What Is Propanol Used For?

    Q: What Is Propanol Used For?

    A: Propanol is most commonly used as a solvent. This solvent, which is better known as isopropanol or isopropyl alcohol, is widely used on printing ink and in the printing industry. However, this is not the only potential application of propanol.
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  • What Is the Use of Chloroxylenol in Dettol Antiseptic Liquid?

    Q: What Is the Use of Chloroxylenol in Dettol Antiseptic Liquid?

    A: The chloroxylenol in Dettol is an antimicrobial disinfectant used to kill bacteria and to prevent infections on minor scrapes, cuts or burns. The substance is commonly found in antibacterial soaps, but it is also used to control bacteria, algae and fungi on industrial surfaces where clean facilities are needed. Some liquids that contain chloroxylenol must be diluted before application on the human body.
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