Chemistry

A:

A glow stick is made up of two tubes: an outer, flexible plastic tube and an inner, smaller tube made of brittle glass. Both tubes contain liquid compounds that create the glowing effect when mixed together.

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  • What Elements Are in Rubber?

    Q: What Elements Are in Rubber?

    A: The two most common elements found in natural rubber are carbon and hydrogen. Eighty percent of the world's natural rubber supply is cultivated from rubber trees that grow in tropical climates such as Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia. Rubber tree plantations can yield 30 to 35 grams of rubber per tree in a single day, which is then used in products such as heavy duty tires.
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  • What Happens When Metals React With Acids?

    Q: What Happens When Metals React With Acids?

    A: While exploring what happens when metals come in contact with acids, it is apparent that most, but not all, have some sort of reaction, usually forming hydrogen gas. The result is the production of salts.
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  • What Color Is Sodium?

    Q: What Color Is Sodium?

    A: The element sodium has a silvery-white color. It is a very common element on earth and accounts for more than 2 percent of the planet's crust.
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  • Where Is Sulfur Found?

    Q: Where Is Sulfur Found?

    A: Sulfur is found naturally around hot springs, volcanoes and in meteorites. It can also be found in cinnabar, gypsum, Epsom salts, stibnite, sphalerite, iron pyrites, barite, celestite and galena.
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  • What Is Diffusion?

    Q: What Is Diffusion?

    A: Diffusion is the movement of something from where there is a lot of it to where there is less. For example, if someone is baking cookies, that pleasant smell shows up near the stove first. Little by little, it spreads throughout the whole room. The molecules with the cookie aroma "diffuse," moving from around the stove to other areas.
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  • What Does Aluminum Look Like?

    Q: What Does Aluminum Look Like?

    A: Aluminum is a dull silvery metal that has a bluish tint. It is ductile and malleable, and it is a good conductor of heat and electricity.
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  • What Is the Cost of the Element Mercury?

    Q: What Is the Cost of the Element Mercury?

    A: As of 2014, the element mercury costs between $2,950 and $3,075 per flask. A flask is equivalent to 76 pounds.
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  • Who Discovered the Proton?

    Q: Who Discovered the Proton?

    A: Ernest Rutherford gets credit for the discovery of the proton. While conducting the first experiment in splitting the atom between nitrogen and alpha particles, he discovered what had been hypothesized for many years before: the proton.
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  • Which Property of Water Is Demonstrated When We Sweat?

    Q: Which Property of Water Is Demonstrated When We Sweat?

    A: Sweating in humans demonstrates water’s tendency to absorb heat by overcoming the hydrogen bonds that hold its molecules together. This property makes it possible for humans to stay cool via sweating, because water requires immense levels of energy to evaporate.
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  • What Is the Chemical Formula for Water Vapor?

    Q: What Is the Chemical Formula for Water Vapor?

    A: The chemical formula for water vapor is H2O. Water is a unique compound because it has the ability to exist on the earth's surface in all three forms: liquid, solid (ice), and gas (water vapor).
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  • How Are Colloids Classified?

    Q: How Are Colloids Classified?

    A: Colloids are generally classified into four types: emulsion, sol, aerosol and foam. The combination of fog and smoke makes up an aerosol, which is comprised of solid particles or liquid droplets dispersed throughout a gas phase. Mayonnaise is an emulsion, which are two liquids dispersed together.
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  • How Was the Proton Discovered?

    Q: How Was the Proton Discovered?

    A: The proton was discovered by Ernest Rutherford through the gold foil experiment, says the Purdue University College of Science. The results of the experiment led Rutherford to conclude that the positive charge and the mass of an atom are concentrated in a tiny fraction of the overall volume. In 1920, Rutherford proposed that the positively charged particle in an atom’s nucleus be called a proton.
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  • How Many Elements Are in the Periodic Table?

    Q: How Many Elements Are in the Periodic Table?

    A: There are 118 known elements on the periodic table. The most recently discovered element, Ununoctium, was first reported by Russian scientists from Dubna in 2002.
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  • Is Distilled Water the Same As Sterile Water?

    Q: Is Distilled Water the Same As Sterile Water?

    A: Sterile and distilled water are both essentially pure H2O, but each is used for different purposes. Distilled water is distributed for use in laboratories and for ordinary consumption. Sterile water is used in the medical community as a wound cleanser or an intravenous fluid.
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  • How Was Fire Discovered?

    Q: How Was Fire Discovered?

    A: Historians do not know for sure just how fire was discovered, but most believe that humans first saw fire after lightning struck a tree during the Lower Paleolithic age. Soon, humans discovered that it was possible to not only use the flame for heat and light, but also to cook food.
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  • What Is Bohr's Atomic Theory?

    Q: What Is Bohr's Atomic Theory?

    A: Bohr's atomic theory suggests that atoms have a positively charged nucleus that is orbited by electrons that move in circles. These electrons move in specific, distinct orbital levels. This theory has since been made obsolete but has had a lasting impact on the understanding of atomic structure and quantum physics.
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  • What Does "alchemist" Mean?

    Q: What Does "alchemist" Mean?

    A: An alchemist is someone who practices alchemy. Alchemy is a form of science dating back to medieval times that concentrates on chemical science and speculative philosophy. It is also used to explain mysterious transformations.
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  • What Is Coal Made Of?

    Q: What Is Coal Made Of?

    A: Coal is a sedentary rock that varies in composition. It forms as organic material compressed under the layers of soil and more organic material above it.
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  • At What Temperature Does Wood Combust?

    Q: At What Temperature Does Wood Combust?

    A: The temperature at which wood combusts varies from 190 to 260 degrees Celsius. The ignition point of wood varies depending on the type of wood and the dryness of the wood. Decayed wood ignites at a temperature of 150 C.
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  • Which Elements Are Used for Making Coins?

    Q: Which Elements Are Used for Making Coins?

    A: Copper, zinc, nickel, gold, manganese and silver are the elements used for making coins. Common U.S. coins, such as the penny and dime, are made mostly of copper.
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  • Why Is the Periodic Table Called the Periodic Table?

    Q: Why Is the Periodic Table Called the Periodic Table?

    A: The periodic table's name comes from the fact that it arranges the elements into repeating sets, otherwise known as "periods." These periods are defined by the covalence of an element, the number of electrons it has in its outermost shell and by other elemental attributes. This arrangement places elements with similar chemical properties close to one another.
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