Chemistry

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Examples of organic materials include wood, paper, textiles and animal parts. Organic materials are any type of materials that are found in nature or are made out of items that are found in nature. Organic materials are composed solely of organic compounds. These compounds contain the element carbon, which is widely found in nature in plants and animals. Organic materials naturally deteriorate over time, according to Preservation 101.

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  • How much is sulfur worth?

    Q: How much is sulfur worth?

    A: According to the 2012 Chemical Economics Handbook report on sulfur, the prices for elemental sulfur can fluctuate between $50 and $800 per ton. Drastic per-ton price fluctuations in sulfur are unusual.
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  • How do the masses of protons and neutrons compare?

    Q: How do the masses of protons and neutrons compare?

    A: A neutron has a slightly greater mass than a proton. According to Dick Plano, professor emeritus of physics at Rutgers University, there are many hypotheses for the mass difference, but a universally accepted hypothesis does not exist.
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  • What is the definition of "crude protein"?

    Q: What is the definition of "crude protein"?

    A: Crude protein is a term for the total protein content of a food source as determined by its nitrogen content. The term is most often used in scientific testing and on the labels of pet foods.
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  • What are properties in science?

    Q: What are properties in science?

    A: In chemistry, the term "property" is frequently used to describe the attributes of a substance, such as density, oxidation, state of matter, mass, conductivity, color, bonding and many other traits. These properties are used to understand how a substance behaves in different situations.
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  • What are the chemical properties of plastic?

    Q: What are the chemical properties of plastic?

    A: Plastics, or polymers, are compounds composed of carbon and hydrogen known as hydrocarbons. According to the American Chemistry Council, polymers can have multidimensional networks of repeating units. Each repeating unit is the “-mer” or basic unit, with “polymer” meaning many repeating units.
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  • What is tocopheryl acetate?

    Q: What is tocopheryl acetate?

    A: Tocopheryl Acetate is vitamin E. Other scientific names for this powerful antioxidant include Alfacol, Ecofrol, Tofaxin, Ephynal acetate, Econ, alpha-Tocopherol acetate and Tokoferol acetate, according to the National Library of Medicine.
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  • Is distilled water the same as sterile water?

    Q: Is distilled water the same as sterile water?

    A: Sterile and distilled water are both essentially pure H2O, but each is used for different purposes. Distilled water is distributed for use in laboratories and for ordinary consumption. Sterile water is used in the medical community as a wound cleanser or an intravenous fluid.
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  • What is the texture of helium?

    Q: What is the texture of helium?

    A: According to Elemental Matter, helium is a gaseous substance, and gases do not have texture. They do have other identifying qualities. Specifically, helium is a noble gas, which means that it is part of section 18 on the periodical table.
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  • What is the Law of Octaves?

    Q: What is the Law of Octaves?

    A: The Law of Octaves is about the patterns of elements in the Periodic Table, stating that when elements are aligned according to their atomic weight, every eighth element shares similar properties. For example, hydrogen, fluorine, chlorine, bromine and iodine are all on the same interval.
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  • How do you control fire?

    Q: How do you control fire?

    A: Controlling fire is largely about preventing its spread and chiefly involves keeping flammable objects at an appropriate distance. Knowing how material responds to fire is also important, and having the right fuel is essential for keeping a fire burning well.
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  • How many elements are in the periodic table?

    Q: How many elements are in the periodic table?

    A: There are 118 known elements on the periodic table. The most recently discovered element, Ununoctium, was first reported by Russian scientists from Dubna in 2002.
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  • What is plastic made of?

    Q: What is plastic made of?

    A: Most plastics are made from oil. Oil is a long-chain hydrocarbon, meaning that it is composed of long chains of carbon molecules. These long chains of carbon molecules give plastic its characteristic strength and flexibility.
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  • What is matter made of?

    Q: What is matter made of?

    A: Matter is made of single particles called atoms and is any substance that has either mass or volume. Matter can exist in three states, either as a solid, a liquid or a gas.
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  • What are examples of solidification?

    Q: What are examples of solidification?

    A: An example of solidification is when cooking oil changes to solid after exposure to cold temperatures. Solidification, also referred to as freezing, is the process by which liquids or fluids change to solids.
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  • What is the boiling point of oil?

    Q: What is the boiling point of oil?

    A: Oils used in food preparation have a range of boiling points, from about 375 F to about 510 F. The boiling point of oil depends upon the specific type of oil that is being heated as well as its specific purity. Crude oil subjected to refining involves a spectrum of different boiling points to extract the various elements comprising it.
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  • Does the viscosity of a liquid affect its boiling point?

    Q: Does the viscosity of a liquid affect its boiling point?

    A: Most often, thicker liquids take longer to boil. Viscosity and boiling point are both physical properties that are determined by intermolecular forces. Although viscosity and boiling point do not directly affect each other, there is a correlation based on the strength of these intermolecular forces.
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  • What is barium phosphate used for?

    Q: What is barium phosphate used for?

    A: Barium phosphate is used to replicate lead contamination in soil without the accompanying lead toxicity. Because of its lack of toxicity, barium phosphate can be utilized in soil as remediation of metal.
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  • What effect does iodine have on onion cells?

    Q: What effect does iodine have on onion cells?

    A: Iodine reacts with the starch present in onion cells, producing a coloration that makes the cells easily visible under a microscope. Onion cells are naturally transparent, so it is difficult to properly visualize them without using a solution to increase contrast.
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  • What are some examples of petrochemicals?

    Q: What are some examples of petrochemicals?

    A: Petrochemicals are organic chemicals made from crude oil and natural gas for use in industrial processes. Examples of primary petrochemicals include methanol, ethylene, propylene, butadiene, benzene, toluene and xylene. Roughly five percent of the world's annual oil supply is utilized to make petrochemicals. These organic substances are used to make plastics, medicines, furniture, appliances, solar panels, PVC pipes, bulletproof vests, consumer electronics, wind turbines and automobile parts.
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  • How does magnesium react with oxygen?

    Q: How does magnesium react with oxygen?

    A: Magnesium has a very energetic combustion reaction with oxygen, where two atoms of magnesium bond with one molecule of oxygen gas to form two molecules of magnesium oxide. This reaction is extremely exothermic, releasing a great deal of heat and light, which is why magnesium fuses are used to initiate reactions such as the thermite reaction, and magnesium is used in flares for high visibility. The reaction of magnesium to oxygen is so energetically favorable that burning magnesium can steal the oxygen from both water and carbon dioxide, making these common methods of dousing flames ineffective to stop magnesium combustion.
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  • What is silicone made of?

    Q: What is silicone made of?

    A: Silicone is made of a chain of alternating silicon and oxygen atoms with two other atoms or compounds bonded to each silicon atom. Its structure is somewhat similar to a hydrocarbon chain, in part because of silicon being part of the same periodic group. However, bonds between silicon atoms, unlike bonds between carbon atoms, are unstable. Silicone, on the other hand, is very stable and resists both heat and chemicals.
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