Chemistry

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Using food color and an eye dropper, a kid can test if molecules move faster in hot or cold water. Attempting to mix oil and water can yield interesting results too. A kid can use an indicator made of cabbage juice to test acidity or alkalinity of household products. An experiment to probe a disposable diaper reveals water-absorbing properties of sodium polyacrylate, which is present in the padding.

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  • What is the molecular weight of copper?

    Q: What is the molecular weight of copper?

    A: The molecular weight of copper is 63.546 multiplied by the number of atoms present in the sample. Copper is an element rather than a compound, so the correct metric to describe its weight is either its atomic weight or its molar weight.
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  • What happens when oxygen reacts with copper?

    Q: What happens when oxygen reacts with copper?

    A: The combination of oxygen and copper produces the substance called copper oxide. The formation of copper oxide requires a specific formula; the creation of this element ultimately produces a gas that resides in the atmosphere.
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  • Why was the pencil invented?

    Q: Why was the pencil invented?

    A: Although no documents state the motivation for the pencil's invention, it was likely first created as an alternative to pens. According to Pencils.com, the first known pencils were developed shortly after the discovery of a graphite deposit in Borrowdale, England, in 1564.
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  • What does oxidation mean?

    Q: What does oxidation mean?

    A: Oxidation, in common parlance, is the process or product of a substance combining with oxygen. The oxidation process may be slow as when a hammer left outside overnight rusts (iron changing to iron oxide). A faster example of oxidation is when a cut apple or banana turns brown.
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  • What is the viscosity of water?

    Q: What is the viscosity of water?

    A: The viscosity of water is 1.0020 millipascal seconds at 20°C. The viscosity of water, and other substances, can change with a difference in temperature. Water has low viscosity compared to other fluids.
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  • How is an indicator defined in chemistry?

    Q: How is an indicator defined in chemistry?

    A: In chemistry, an indicator is defined as a substance that undergoes distinct observable change when the conditions of its solution change. Litmus is the most commonly used indicator in the laboratory.
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  • How was the proton discovered?

    Q: How was the proton discovered?

    A: The proton was discovered by Ernest Rutherford through the gold foil experiment, says the Purdue University College of Science. The results of the experiment led Rutherford to conclude that the positive charge and the mass of an atom are concentrated in a tiny fraction of the overall volume. In 1920, Rutherford proposed that the positively charged particle in an atom���s nucleus be called a proton.
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  • What is the cost of the element mercury?

    Q: What is the cost of the element mercury?

    A: As of 2014, the element mercury costs between $2,950 and $3,075 per flask. A flask is equivalent to 76 pounds.
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  • How much mercury is there in a thermometer?

    Q: How much mercury is there in a thermometer?

    A: The amount of mercury in a thermometer is about 3 grams. A mercury thermometer is used to measure the body temperature.
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  • What is the use of chloroxylenol in Dettol antiseptic liquid?

    Q: What is the use of chloroxylenol in Dettol antiseptic liquid?

    A: The chloroxylenol in Dettol is an antimicrobial disinfectant used to kill bacteria and to prevent infections on minor scrapes, cuts or burns. The substance is commonly found in antibacterial soaps, but it is also used to control bacteria, algae and fungi on industrial surfaces where clean facilities are needed. Some liquids that contain chloroxylenol must be diluted before application on the human body.
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  • What is the definition of synthesis?

    Q: What is the definition of synthesis?

    A: Synthesis generally refers to the combining of multiple elements into a single entity or compound. While synthesis sometimes results naturally, scientists in many fields perform synthesis as part of experimentation, solution development or product creation.
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  • What is the nickname for mercury?

    Q: What is the nickname for mercury?

    A: The nickname for the element mercury is "quicksilver." Mercury's atomic symbol, Hg, is derived from the Greek word "hydrargyrum," which means "liquid silver." It is the only metal that is a liquid at room temperature.
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  • How many atoms make up a single element?

    Q: How many atoms make up a single element?

    A: An element is a description of a type of atom, so a single atom is representative of an element but not an element itself. "An atom" refers to a physical entity; "an element" refers to a type of atom.
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  • Is it possible for kerosene to go bad?

    Q: Is it possible for kerosene to go bad?

    A: Stored kerosene can go bad. When kerosene is being stored, condensation can seep into the container and cause a problem. Sludge can develop from the mold and bacteria within the kerosene, and that causes it to break down.
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  • What is the difference between salt and sugar crystals?

    Q: What is the difference between salt and sugar crystals?

    A: Sugar and salt crystals are made of entirely different elements and have very different chemical and physical properties. While both dissolve readily in water, they dissolve in different ways, and unlike sugar, the dissolution of salt is largely unaffected by temperature. Their greatest similarities are in their common appearance as small white crystals and their use in the preparation and flavoring of food.
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  • What are some common ionic compounds that are used in everyday life?

    Q: What are some common ionic compounds that are used in everyday life?

    A: One of the more common ionic compounds that is used often is baking soda. Baking soda is also known as bicarbonate or hydrogen carbonate.
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  • What is propanol used for?

    Q: What is propanol used for?

    A: Propanol is most commonly used as a solvent. This solvent, which is better known as isopropanol or isopropyl alcohol, is widely used on printing ink and in the printing industry. However, this is not the only potential application of propanol.
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  • Why do metals rust?

    Q: Why do metals rust?

    A: Many metals oxidize and corrode, but rust, or iron oxide, is specific to ferrous metals such as steel. Rust is formed when oxygen bonds with an atom of iron to form an iron oxide molecule. This molecule is considerably larger than the surrounding iron molecules, so it quickly becomes dislodged and flakes off the surface. This exposes fresh metal that can also rust.
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  • What is a quarter stick of dynamite?

    Q: What is a quarter stick of dynamite?

    A: A quarter stick of dynamite has an average size of 1 inch in diameter and 6 inches in length. It is made with thick cardboard walls and filled with explosive powder. A quarter stick, which is also called an M-1000, is usually used as a firecracker.
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  • Why is nitrogen important to life?

    Q: Why is nitrogen important to life?

    A: Nitrogen is important to life because it comprises approximately 80 percent of the Earth's atmosphere and is present in all living things as a part of proteins and DNA, according to the Marine Biological Laboratory. Nitrogen is present in the amino acids that make up proteins. It is also essential to reproduction because it is present in the nucleic acids in genetic material, or DNA.
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  • Why doesn't sand dissolve in water?

    Q: Why doesn't sand dissolve in water?

    A: Silicon dioxide, the primary component in sand, forms in large crystalline structures, which are held together by covalent bonds. These bonds require more energy to break than the polarity of water is able to supply. While water is able to dissolve a minute amount of silicon dioxide, natural water supplies are at the saturation point and unable to dissolve any more sand.
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