Chemistry

A:

Other than its place on the periodic table of the elements with the other noble gases, the main source of neon on Earth is in the atmosphere. This element is very rare on Earth, though it is one of the four most commonly occurring elements in the universe. Earth just happens to have a very low concentration of neon relative to other parts of the universe.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • What Is Silicon Dioxide?

    Q: What Is Silicon Dioxide?

    A: Silicon dioxide, or silica, is a chemical compound that is the main component of sand, glass and quartz. By processing sand at high temperatures, glass is formed. Sand, and therefore glass, may also contain other minerals.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Are Quantum Numbers in Chemistry?

    Q: What Are Quantum Numbers in Chemistry?

    A: In chemistry, quantum numbers describe the orbitals in which electrons are found in an atom. There are four quantum numbers in total, which all describe the characteristics and locations of electrons in their orbitals. The four quantum numbers include: the principal quantum number (n), the angular quantum number (l), the magnetic quantum number (m) and the spin quantum number (ms).
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why Are Metals Malleable and Ductile?

    Q: Why Are Metals Malleable and Ductile?

    A: Metals are malleable and ductile because they are made of hexagonal and cubic packed structures that can be moved by applying force to them. When force is applied, the atoms slide from one plane past atoms in a different plane.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Freezing Point of Sulfuric Acid?

    Q: What Is the Freezing Point of Sulfuric Acid?

    A: The freezing point of sulfuric acid is 37 degrees Fahrenheit, or 3 degrees Celsius, in a 98 percent solution where gravity is 1.84, nearly double that of water. Sulfuric acid's boiling point is 640 degrees Fahrenheit, or 338 degrees Celsius.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Does "alchemist" Mean?

    Q: What Does "alchemist" Mean?

    A: An alchemist is someone who practices alchemy. Alchemy is a form of science dating back to medieval times that concentrates on chemical science and speculative philosophy. It is also used to explain mysterious transformations.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Are the Advantages of Chemical Energy?

    Q: What Are the Advantages of Chemical Energy?

    A: Chemical energy is abundant, easily combustible and has high efficiency. It does have its disadvantages, as it is also sometimes harmful to the environment and humans and tends to be non-renewable.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Family Does Iron Belong To?

    Q: What Family Does Iron Belong To?

    A: Iron belongs to the family of transition metals. Like main group metals, transition metals are hard, conduct both heat and electricity and are malleable. One of the few differences is that transition metals are more electronegative.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Does Iodine Look Like?

    Q: What Does Iodine Look Like?

    A: Solid iodine consists of shiny bluish-black crystals, but iodine vapors are a purple gas. Iodine is named after the appearance of the iodine vapors, as "iodes" is the Greek word for purple.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Importance of Chemistry?

    Q: What Is the Importance of Chemistry?

    A: Chemistry is basic to essentially every field of science. A working knowledge of chemistry informs medicine, energy production and the vast majority of industrial processes. A comprehensive theory of chemistry allows predictions to be made about how any substance in the universe will behave in the presence of any other substance.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Composition of Pure Air?

    Q: What Is the Composition of Pure Air?

    A: By volume, dry air is 78.09 percent nitrogen and 20.95 percent oxygen, accounting for over 99 percent of the total volume. The remaining 1 percent is made up of argon, carbon dioxide, neon, methane, helium, krypton, hydrogen, xenon, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, iodine and trace amounts of carbon monoxide and ammonia.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Most Reactive Metal in the Periodic Table?

    Q: What Is the Most Reactive Metal in the Periodic Table?

    A: The most reactive metal in the periodic table is francium. Francium belongs to the alkali metals, a group on the periodic table whose members are all highly reactive. These metals are highly reactive because they all have only one valence electron.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Are Examples of Alkaline Substances?

    Q: What Are Examples of Alkaline Substances?

    A: Lye, baking soda and ammonia are examples of common alkaline substances. The word alkaline describes a water-based solution with a pH above 7.0.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do I Calculate the Weight of Aluminum?

    Q: How Do I Calculate the Weight of Aluminum?

    A: To calculate the weight of aluminum, one needs to determine the size of the aluminium in cubic centimeters, and then, they need to multiply that number by the weight of the aluminum. Aluminium weighs 2.699 grams per cubic centimeter.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Boiling Point of Acetone?

    Q: What Is the Boiling Point of Acetone?

    A: The boiling point of acetone is 56.05 degrees C (132.8 degrees F) at sea level. Like other liquids, this decreases as altitude increases.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Hardest Substance Known to Man?

    Q: What Is the Hardest Substance Known to Man?

    A: The hardest known substance is lonsdaleite, also called hexagonal diamond, according to a study published in Physical Review Letters and reported on Phys.org. Lonsdaleite is 58 percent stronger than diamond, which was previously considered to be the hardest substance.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Where Is Sulfur Found?

    Q: Where Is Sulfur Found?

    A: Sulfur is found naturally around hot springs, volcanoes and in meteorites. It can also be found in cinnabar, gypsum, Epsom salts, stibnite, sphalerite, iron pyrites, barite, celestite and galena.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Which Elements Are Used for Making Coins?

    Q: Which Elements Are Used for Making Coins?

    A: Copper, zinc, nickel, gold, manganese and silver are the elements used for making coins. Common U.S. coins, such as the penny and dime, are made mostly of copper.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Reactive Is Silver?

    Q: How Reactive Is Silver?

    A: According to Encyclopedia Britannica, silver is one of the least types of chemically reactive elements. Silver is a chemical element, and the metal is a lustrous and white color.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is Barium Phosphate Used For?

    Q: What Is Barium Phosphate Used For?

    A: Barium phosphate is used to replicate lead contamination in soil without the accompanying lead toxicity. Because of its lack of toxicity, barium phosphate can be utilized in soil as remediation of metal.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is Plastic Made Of?

    Q: What Is Plastic Made Of?

    A: Most plastics are made from oil. Oil is a long-chain hydrocarbon, meaning that it is composed of long chains of carbon molecules. These long chains of carbon molecules give plastic its characteristic strength and flexibility.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Melting Point of Copper?

    Q: What Is the Melting Point of Copper?

    A: The melting point of copper is 1,984.31 degrees Fahrenheit, or 1,084.62 degrees Celsius. According to the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), its boiling point is 4,643.6 degrees Fahrenheit, or 2,562 degrees Celsius.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: