Chemistry

A:

Sulfur is commonly used to produce sulfuric acid, which is used in the extraction of phosphate for fertilizer, according to the Royal Society of Chemistry. It is also used in black gunpowder, as a fungicide and in vulcanizing black rubber.

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  • How is carbon stored in the biosphere?

    Q: How is carbon stored in the biosphere?

    A: Carbon is stored in the biosphere within living or recently dead plants, animals and microorganisms in the ocean and on land. Forests contain 86 percent of the planet's carbon on top of the ground. This biomass is released into the carbon cycle through natural decomposition and respiration.
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  • What are the ingredients of chalk?

    Q: What are the ingredients of chalk?

    A: Natural chalk is a common form of calcium carbonate. Unlike other, chemically similar minerals, chalk deposits are laid down by living organisms known as coccolithophores. These microscopic animals thrive in the warm, shallow seas that proliferated in the Cretaceous Period, which derives its name from the Latin word for chalk.
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  • How do the masses of protons and neutrons compare?

    Q: How do the masses of protons and neutrons compare?

    A: A neutron has a slightly greater mass than a proton. According to Dick Plano, professor emeritus of physics at Rutgers University, there are many hypotheses for the mass difference, but a universally accepted hypothesis does not exist.
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  • Why does sugar dissolve faster in hot tea than in iced tea?

    Q: Why does sugar dissolve faster in hot tea than in iced tea?

    A: Sugar dissolves more quickly in hot tea than in iced tea because the solubility of solutes in solvents generally increases with an increase in temperature, according to Rutgers University. The heat provides energy to break the molecular bonds in the solid, causing it to dissolve faster.
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  • What is a practical application of Boyle's law?

    Q: What is a practical application of Boyle's law?

    A: One practical application of Boyle's law is drawing fluid into a syringe. Pulling back on the plunger increases the interior volume of the syringe and reduces its pressure. The fluid outside the syringe is sucked into the barrel until the interior and exterior pressure are balanced.
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  • Where does iridium come from?

    Q: Where does iridium come from?

    A: Iridium is an element that originates in the stars. A supernova event is responsible for the creation of this element and it does not occur as a result of fusion.
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  • What is the composition of pure air?

    Q: What is the composition of pure air?

    A: By volume, dry air is 78.09 percent nitrogen and 20.95 percent oxygen, accounting for over 99 percent of the total volume. The remaining 1 percent is made up of argon, carbon dioxide, neon, methane, helium, krypton, hydrogen, xenon, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, iodine and trace amounts of carbon monoxide and ammonia.
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  • What are examples of alkaline substances?

    Q: What are examples of alkaline substances?

    A: Lye, baking soda and ammonia are examples of common alkaline substances. The word alkaline describes a water-based solution with a pH above 7.0.
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  • What is the hardest substance known to man?

    Q: What is the hardest substance known to man?

    A: The hardest known substance is lonsdaleite, also called hexagonal diamond, according to a study published in Physical Review Letters and reported on Phys.org. Lonsdaleite is 58 percent stronger than diamond, which was previously considered to be the hardest substance.
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  • What does arsenic look like?

    Q: What does arsenic look like?

    A: Arsenic is a gray or yellow crystalline that often looks like a jagged rock when it is in its natural state. It is typically somewhat shiny, resembling silver.
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  • What does iodine look like?

    Q: What does iodine look like?

    A: Solid iodine consists of shiny bluish-black crystals, but iodine vapors are a purple gas. Iodine is named after the appearance of the iodine vapors, as "iodes" is the Greek word for purple.
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  • What is diffusion?

    Q: What is diffusion?

    A: Diffusion is the movement of something from where there is a lot of it to where there is less. For example, if someone is baking cookies, that pleasant smell shows up near the stove first. Little by little, it spreads throughout the whole room. The molecules with the cookie aroma "diffuse," moving from around the stove to other areas.
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  • How many elements are in the periodic table?

    Q: How many elements are in the periodic table?

    A: There are 118 known elements on the periodic table. The most recently discovered element, Ununoctium, was first reported by Russian scientists from Dubna in 2002.
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  • Is methane gas harmful to humans?

    Q: Is methane gas harmful to humans?

    A: Methane gas is not considered dangerous to humans by inhalation. Exposure to methane gas in air with low oxygen levels may cause dizziness, headaches and a feeling of fatigue with no lethal effects.
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  • Where does plutonium come from?

    Q: Where does plutonium come from?

    A: Plutonium naturally forms in the heart of a star undergoing supernova, along with virtually all of the heavy elements in the universe. It is not found on Earth due to its instability. The most stable isotope of naturally occurring plutonium has a half-life of only 82,000,000 years and is exhausted well before it can be taken up in planetary formation. However, humans have been able to artificially create plutonium.
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  • What substances make up crude oil?

    Q: What substances make up crude oil?

    A: Crude oil mainly consists of hydrocarbon molecules, but impurities, such as sulfur, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, arsenic, vanadium, copper, nickel, sodium chloride, calcium chloride and magnesium chloride, are also present. The hydrocarbon molecules include straight chains, branched chains and rings.
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  • What are examples of mineral salts?

    Q: What are examples of mineral salts?

    A: Examples of mineral salts include sodium, calcium, ammonium phosphate, potassium, magnesium, chlorine, sulphur and phosphorus. Mineral salts are naturally occurring inorganic substances that are extracted from below the ground surface.
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  • What did Dmitri Mendeleev discover in 1869?

    Q: What did Dmitri Mendeleev discover in 1869?

    A: In 1869, Dmitri Mendeleev discovered how to classify elements into a periodic table. Although other scientists had been trying to find a way to classify the elements, Mendeleev's version was the clearest and most systematic.
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  • What is the molar heat capacity of liquid water?

    Q: What is the molar heat capacity of liquid water?

    A: The molar heat capacity of liquid water is 75.348 J/mol K. It is calculated as the product of the specific heat capacity of liquid water and the molar mass of water.
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  • What are the three properties of air?

    Q: What are the three properties of air?

    A: The three properties of air are that it has weight, can be compressed and takes up space. The fact that it can be compressed makes it quite different from solids and liquids, which are unable to be compressed.
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  • Why does burning wood pop and crackle?

    Q: Why does burning wood pop and crackle?

    A: Burning wood will pop and crackle if it is softwood, which grows quickly and then dries easily, leaving gaps in the wood where fluids once resided. Softwoods, such as fir, hemlock and pine, contain resin, which can add to the popping sounds and also create potentially dangerous creosote in chimneys.
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