Chemistry

A:

Fulminated mercury is an explosive compound that is highly sensitive to shock and friction. It is often used to trigger other, less sensitive explosives, such as TNT, dynamite and plastic explosives.

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  • What are some uses of hydrogen?

    Q: What are some uses of hydrogen?

    A: Hydrogen is used to manufacture the important chemical compounds ammonia and methanol, according to the Essential Chemical Industry. It is also used in such oil refinery processes as reforming, in which sulfur compounds are removed from petroleum to improve the petroleum's quality.
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  • Where does air come from?

    Q: Where does air come from?

    A: Oxygen is one of the primary components that allows air to be breathable to people and it began forming in the atmosphere approximately one billion years ago. Until the ozone layer formed, most life on the planet was restricted to the oceans.
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  • Where is iodine found in the world?

    Q: Where is iodine found in the world?

    A: Oceans are one of the world's greatest sources of iodine. Iodine can also be found in other salty waters, such as brines found near oil deposits. China, Japan, Russia and Chile are some of the top global producers of iodine.
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  • What is magnesium sulphate paste?

    Q: What is magnesium sulphate paste?

    A: According to the website Drugs, a magnesium sulphate paste is a drawing ointment for boils and carbuncles. Sold as a prepackaged over-the-counter ointment, the paste is comprised of dried magnesium sulphate, phenol and glycerol. The paste is designed to dry out skin infections.
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  • How did lithium get its name?

    Q: How did lithium get its name?

    A: The word "lithium" is derived from the Greek word for stone, "lithos", because it was first discovered in stone. Lithium is one of several alkali metals discovered and named in the early 1800s. The other two, sodium and potassium were also named after the materials that were being studied when they were discovered.
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  • What is the hardest substance known to man?

    Q: What is the hardest substance known to man?

    A: The hardest known substance is lonsdaleite, also called hexagonal diamond, according to a study published in Physical Review Letters and reported on Phys.org. Lonsdaleite is 58 percent stronger than diamond, which was previously considered to be the hardest substance.
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  • Why are metals malleable and ductile?

    Q: Why are metals malleable and ductile?

    A: Metals are malleable and ductile because they are made of hexagonal and cubic packed structures that can be moved by applying force to them. When force is applied, the atoms slide from one plane past atoms in a different plane.
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  • What are some everyday uses for bromine?

    Q: What are some everyday uses for bromine?

    A: Bromine is used in everyday products such as pesticides and water treatment solutions. Bromine is a reddish-brown gas that has a pungent smell and can irritate the skin, nose and eyes. Bromine was discovered in 1826 by A.J. Balard.
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  • What is gold made of?

    Q: What is gold made of?

    A: Because gold is an element, a lump of pure gold contains nothing but gold atoms. Because pure gold is very soft and easily marred, it is often alloyed with other metals to make jewelry, coins and other precious objects.
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  • Why doesn't sand dissolve in water?

    Q: Why doesn't sand dissolve in water?

    A: Silicon dioxide, the primary component in sand, forms in large crystalline structures, which are held together by covalent bonds. These bonds require more energy to break than the polarity of water is able to supply. While water is able to dissolve a minute amount of silicon dioxide, natural water supplies are at the saturation point and unable to dissolve any more sand.
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  • What is the red liquid in a thermometer?

    Q: What is the red liquid in a thermometer?

    A: The red liquid inside of a thermometer is alcohol. When the temperature changes, the alcohol expands, providing a reading based on the thermometer's scale. Red dye is used to color the clear alcohol so that someone is able to easily read the thermometer.
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  • Why are alloys used?

    Q: Why are alloys used?

    A: Alloys mix metals with other elements to help harden and otherwise make them more useful. For example, gold is too soft to make good jewelry on its own, but it can be mixed with other elements, including harder metals like zinc and nickel, to help make it strong enough to be formed into rings and other jewelry pieces.
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  • What is sodium bisulfate?

    Q: What is sodium bisulfate?

    A: Sodium bisulfate is a dry acid often used as a fungicide, herbicide, pH adjuster or microbiocidein. It comes in a variety of consistencies, such as a powder, granular or crystal form, and is commonly found in metal finishing and swimming pool and household cleaning products.
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  • What are some other names for formaldehyde?

    Q: What are some other names for formaldehyde?

    A: Formaldehyde can also be known as methanal, which is the substance's systematic name, or by alternate names like methyl aldehyde, methylene glycol or methylene oxide. This chemical compound is the simplest member of the aldehyde functional group and has a chemical formula of CH2O or HCHO. Though it is a gas at room temperature, formaldehyde solutions are used in the preservation of biological specimens and as a disinfectant.
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  • What are some examples of petrochemicals?

    Q: What are some examples of petrochemicals?

    A: Petrochemicals are organic chemicals made from crude oil and natural gas for use in industrial processes. Examples of primary petrochemicals include methanol, ethylene, propylene, butadiene, benzene, toluene and xylene. Roughly five percent of the world's annual oil supply is utilized to make petrochemicals. These organic substances are used to make plastics, medicines, furniture, appliances, solar panels, PVC pipes, bulletproof vests, consumer electronics, wind turbines and automobile parts.
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  • What are the chemical properties of plastic?

    Q: What are the chemical properties of plastic?

    A: Plastics, or polymers, are compounds composed of carbon and hydrogen known as hydrocarbons. According to the American Chemistry Council, polymers can have multidimensional networks of repeating units. Each repeating unit is the “-mer” or basic unit, with “polymer” meaning many repeating units.
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  • Is silicon a metal or nonmetal?

    Q: Is silicon a metal or nonmetal?

    A: Silicon is a metalloid, which means it is a type of metal but has some nonmetal qualities depending on what element it is reacting with. An example of this would be the fact that silicon is not a good conductor of electricity.
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  • What are some examples of porous materials?

    Q: What are some examples of porous materials?

    A: The word "porous" refers to a material that has pores, or holes in its surface; some examples of porous materials include sponges, pumice stones and cork. Some porous materials have more noticeable pores than others, and this quality of porousness is described as a material's porosity. Human skin is porous, for example, and pores are more pronounced on some people's skin than on others.
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  • How has chemistry improved people's lives?

    Q: How has chemistry improved people's lives?

    A: Chemistry improves almost all aspects of people's lives either directly or indirectly; advances in chemistry have led to life-saving medicine, improvements to the way humans treat their environment, sources of green energy and other useful technologies. Chemistry is often referred to as the "central science" because of its role in connecting and advancing disparate fields, and its effects on people's lives reflect its diverse applications.
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  • What is the most flammable substance in the world?

    Q: What is the most flammable substance in the world?

    A: The most flammable substance in the world is chlorine trifluoride, according to About.com. This substance is so flammable that it does not require an ignition source to combust.
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  • What happens when metals react with acids?

    Q: What happens when metals react with acids?

    A: When acids react with metals, they produce a salt and hydrogen gas. Most metals react with acids, but not all. The general equation that describes the chemical reaction between an acid and metal is metal + acid = salt + hydrogen gas.
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