Cells

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The job of the nucleus is to essentially act as the brain of a cell. The nucleus contains the DNA material for a cell. Due to harboring the DNA, the nucleus is responsible for regular functions of the cell, such as administration and the processing of information.

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  • What Makes Plant and Animal Cells Different?

    Q: What Makes Plant and Animal Cells Different?

    A: There are several key differences between plant and animal cells, such as cell wall structure, presence or absence of plastids, lysosomes and centrioles and shape of vacuoles. These characteristics are the primary and most distinct differences between plant and animal cells. However, they only exist in organisms classified as eukaryotic, and occur primarily in central organelles.
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  • What Is the Definition of a Plant Cell?

    Q: What Is the Definition of a Plant Cell?

    A: A plant cell is the structural and functional unit of a plant. Plant cells generally form several different colonies in order to become a higher functioning organism.
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  • Why Does a Cell Make a Copy of Its DNA Before Mitosis Occurs?

    Q: Why Does a Cell Make a Copy of Its DNA Before Mitosis Occurs?

    A: A cell makes a copy of its DNA before mitosis occurs so there is a set of DNA for the daughter cell after mitosis has occurred. Because each cell needs its own set of DNA, there must be two sets of DNA present in a cell before it divides into two.
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  • What Are Analogies for Chloroplasts?

    Q: What Are Analogies for Chloroplasts?

    A: According to Online Digital Education Connection, analogies for chloroplasts are power plants that imitate the function of chloroplasts in a plant cell to utilize solar energy or light in the processing of food for plant cells. Score Science lists solar energy plants as city analogies for chloroplasts.
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  • What Is the Function of the Dermis Layer of Cells?

    Q: What Is the Function of the Dermis Layer of Cells?

    A: The dermis layer of skin is beneath the epidermis, and its main function is temperature regulation and blood supply. The dermis also gives skin its thickness, and it makes up roughly 90 percent of the thickness of skin.
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  • What Is the Difference Between Plant Cells Vs. Animal Cells?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Plant Cells Vs. Animal Cells?

    A: Plant cells differ from animal cells in three major ways: their components, their function and the structures they build. Plant cells are typically more rigid than animal cells; they do not move, and they are able to synthesize all the chemical compounds needed by the organism. Animal cells must receive at least some of their nutrients from an outside source.
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  • How Does the Structure of a Muscle Cell Type Relate to Its Function?

    Q: How Does the Structure of a Muscle Cell Type Relate to Its Function?

    A: According to About.com Biology section, there are three different types of muscle cells, and each has a different structure related to its function. Cardiac muscles are designed to contract together; skeletal-muscle cells have ordered striations so that they can contract farther than other muscle cells to move the body; and, visceral-muscle cells are designed to contract slower and remain contracted for long periods of time.
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  • Why Is the Nucleus Called the Control Center of the Cell?

    Q: Why Is the Nucleus Called the Control Center of the Cell?

    A: The nucleus can be thought of as the control center of a eukaryotic cell because it contains most of the genetic material that carries the instructions for the cell's operations. Inside the nucleus, DNA directs the sequence of chemical steps needed for the synthesis of proteins and, by way of the proteins' action, it controls the metabolism of the rest of the cell.
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  • Why Are Cells Called the Basic Unit of Life?

    Q: Why Are Cells Called the Basic Unit of Life?

    A: Cell are considered the basic unit of life because all life forms are composed of them. Some forms of life are made of one cell; others contain trillions.
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  • Why Does a Sperm Cell Have a Tail?

    Q: Why Does a Sperm Cell Have a Tail?

    A: Sperm cells have tails primarily for the purpose of swimming. They must move from the vagina up through the female reproductive system.
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  • What Is a Summary of Mitosis?

    Q: What Is a Summary of Mitosis?

    A: During mitosis, a cell enlarges, splits and multiplies DNA, and then separates into two daughter cells. During this reproductive cycle, the cell goes through five different phases.
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  • How Do Cells Use Energy?

    Q: How Do Cells Use Energy?

    A: Cells use energy in order to grow, regulate metabolism and reproduce. This energy is obtained from a source such as food molecules or light from the sun, and through processes like glycolysis, the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation, an energy-rich molecule is then created. The cell can then use the energy in the protein molecule to help it function.
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  • What Is Diffusion in Science?

    Q: What Is Diffusion in Science?

    A: Diffusion is the action of molecules moving from an area of high concentration to an area of lower concentration. It is caused by kinetic energy.
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  • What Is a Cell Membrane?

    Q: What Is a Cell Membrane?

    A: A cell membrane is a thin layer that acts as a barrier that separates an individual cell or a cellular compartment from other surrounding structures. This dynamic layer plays an essential part in the transport of ions and nutrients.
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  • Why Are Cells so Small?

    Q: Why Are Cells so Small?

    A: Brooklyn College explains that cells are small because they must have a large surface area relative to the amount of volume they contain to function properly. As a sphere grows larger, its volume increases much more rapidly than its surface area does. This presents logistical problems for the cell, as it tries to transport resources and products through a large volume without the resources available via a large surface.
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  • What Are the Similarities Between Plant and Animal Cells?

    Q: What Are the Similarities Between Plant and Animal Cells?

    A: Plant and animals cells have many of the same organelles, such as the nucleus, mitochondrion, Golgi apparatus, ribosomes and endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, the contents of these cells are held together by cell membranes.
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  • If a Human Skill Cell Has 46 Chromosomes, How Many Chromosomes Will Each New Skin Cell Have After Mitosis?

    Q: If a Human Skill Cell Has 46 Chromosomes, How Many Chromosomes Will Each New Skin Cell Have After Mitosis?

    A: Human skin cells reproduce continuously, and each daughter cell carries a complete set of 46 chromosomes. Nucleated somatic cells, which make up the body and carry a complement of DNA, all have the same number of chromosomes as their parent cells.
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  • What Is the Function of the Cheek Cell?

    Q: What Is the Function of the Cheek Cell?

    A: A cheek cell, an epithelial cell found in the tissue on the inside lining of the mouth, continually secretes mucus to maintains a moist environment in the mouth. Together with salivary glands that secrete saliva, the cheek cells supply enough moisture in the mouth for enzymes to thrive. This moisture softens food, assists in swallowing and starts digestion.
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  • Why Is Cellular Respiration Important?

    Q: Why Is Cellular Respiration Important?

    A: Faculty resources from Thomas Nelson Community College explain that cellular respiration is the process by which cells produce adenosine triphosphate, or ATP. ATP is the molecule that carries energy for the cells of an organism, and it functions as a “currency” for the cells in an organism. Cells cannot store ATP; instead, they must produce it continuously or the organism will die.
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  • What Organelle Produces ATP?

    Q: What Organelle Produces ATP?

    A: The mitochondria inside a cell produces ATP, or adenosine triphosphate. Cellular respiration is responsible for ATP production, a process in which ATP production occurs after biochemical energy from nutrients is converted.
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  • Why Do Cells Divide?

    Q: Why Do Cells Divide?

    A: Cells divide as a way of reproducing or growing or to create sex cells. Cells can only reach a certain size due to a lack of balanced growth between their parts, so they have to divide once they reach a certain point. Sex cells, such as eggs and sperm, are only created through specialized cell division.
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