Cells

A:

DNA stands for deoxyribonucleic acid, which is the molecule that carries genetic information in humans and all other living organisms.

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  • Why Does a Sperm Cell Have a Tail?

    Q: Why Does a Sperm Cell Have a Tail?

    A: Sperm cells have tails primarily for the purpose of swimming. They must move from the vagina up through the female reproductive system.
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  • Why Is RNA Important to the Cell?

    Q: Why Is RNA Important to the Cell?

    A: RNA is important to cells because it relays information encoded in DNA to tiny organs within the cell, called ribosomes, which produce protein according to the RNA's instructions. RNA is thus vital to the basic functioning of the cell.
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  • What Are Examples of Single-Celled Organisms?

    Q: What Are Examples of Single-Celled Organisms?

    A: Examples of single-celled organisms include species in the Kingdom Protista, the Kingdom Monera and a few representatives of the Kingdom Fungi. Monera includes both conventional bacteria, called eubacteria, and a very strange group of organisms known as archeobacteria.
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  • What Are Analogies for Chloroplasts?

    Q: What Are Analogies for Chloroplasts?

    A: According to Online Digital Education Connection, analogies for chloroplasts are power plants that imitate the function of chloroplasts in a plant cell to utilize solar energy or light in the processing of food for plant cells. Score Science lists solar energy plants as city analogies for chloroplasts.
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  • What Is a Summary of Mitosis?

    Q: What Is a Summary of Mitosis?

    A: During mitosis, a cell enlarges, splits and multiplies DNA, and then separates into two daughter cells. During this reproductive cycle, the cell goes through five different phases.
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  • What Is Biofilm?

    Q: What Is Biofilm?

    A: Biofilm is a group of microorganisms that are joined together on a surface. They adhere to each other with molecular strands called extracellular polymeric substances, or EPS.
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  • What Is a Physiological Adaptation?

    Q: What Is a Physiological Adaptation?

    A: A physiological adaptation is when an individual has a systemic response to an external stimulus, with the intent to remain in its homeostasis. Physiological adaptations differ from evolutionary adaptations because they don't involve transgenerational adjustment; instead, these are instead narrow in scope, having to do with an individual's change. A simple example of a physiological adaptation is when someone gets a tan from being out in the sun for a long time.
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  • How Do Cells Use Energy?

    Q: How Do Cells Use Energy?

    A: Cells use energy in order to grow, regulate metabolism and reproduce. This energy is obtained from a source such as food molecules or light from the sun, and through processes like glycolysis, the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation, an energy-rich molecule is then created. The cell can then use the energy in the protein molecule to help it function.
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  • Which Organelle Performs Cellular Respiration?

    Q: Which Organelle Performs Cellular Respiration?

    A: According to About.com, cellular respiration takes place in the mitochondria. While mitochondria primarily exist to serve as “power plants” for the cell, converting natural resources into usable energy, they also play a role in cellular division, cell growth and cell death.
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  • What Does DNA Stand For?

    Q: What Does DNA Stand For?

    A: DNA stands for deoxyribonucleic acid, which is the molecule that carries genetic information in humans and all other living organisms. Deoxyribonucleic acid is composed of four chemical bases: adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine. The sequence of these bases within DNA encodes genetic information.
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  • What Are the Differences Between Plant Cells and Animal Cells?

    Q: What Are the Differences Between Plant Cells and Animal Cells?

    A: The main difference between plant cells and animals cells is that plant cells possess a cell wall and animal cells do not. Animal cells have an irregular shape, and plant cells have a fixed, rectangular shape.
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  • What Is the Function of Cytoplasm?

    Q: What Is the Function of Cytoplasm?

    A: Cytoplasm has many functions in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including aiding in the movement of cellular materials and transporting the genetic material and products of cellular respiration. It also acts as a liquid medium to suspend organelles and helps cells expand during reproduction.
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  • What Is the Function of Collar Cells in Sponges?

    Q: What Is the Function of Collar Cells in Sponges?

    A: Collar cells beat their flagella back and forth to force water through the sponge. Collar cells also pick up tiny bits of food brought in with water.
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  • What Is the Function of the Mitochondrion?

    Q: What Is the Function of the Mitochondrion?

    A: A mitochondrion produces energy for a cell. Mitochondria (the plural of mitochondrion) are small organelles found in most nucleated cells, including those of plants, animals and fungi.
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  • What Is the Importance of Meiosis?

    Q: What Is the Importance of Meiosis?

    A: The importance of meiosis is that it enables genetic diversity. Unlike the asexual form of cellular division, mitosis, meiosis allows chromosome pairs with the same genes, called homologous chromosomes, to exchange pieces in a process called recombination. This enables chromosome pieces from the female parent to combine with those of the male parent.
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  • What Is the Largest Cell in the World?

    Q: What Is the Largest Cell in the World?

    A: The largest cell in the world is an ostrich’s egg. Sometimes weighing over 3 pounds, the ostrich’s egg is composed of a single cell, as all other animal eggs are.
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  • What Are the Three Parts of the Cell Theory?

    Q: What Are the Three Parts of the Cell Theory?

    A: The three fundamental propositions of classical cell theory are that the cell is the most basic unit of life, all life is made up of cells and cells are formed only by other cells. Each tenet of this theory is important to understanding the way living things function on every level.
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  • What Are Some of the Main Functions of Skin Cells?

    Q: What Are Some of the Main Functions of Skin Cells?

    A: Some of the main functions of skin cells are to provide protection, perceive and transmit sensation, control evaporation and regulate temperature. Skin cells, which are epithelial cells, are also self-repairing and reproduce quickly. Epithelial cells are the most commonly found of the four tissue types.
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  • What Is the Function of a Cell Membrane?

    Q: What Is the Function of a Cell Membrane?

    A: A cell membrane protects the structures within the cell. Cell membranes are semipermeable, meaning that only certain objects are able to pass through them. Cell membranes also give shape to the cell and support its structure.
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  • What Is the Function of the Cell Body?

    Q: What Is the Function of the Cell Body?

    A: The main function of the cell body of a neuron is to integrate synaptic information and transmit this information to other cells via the axon. The cell body also completes a variety of biochemical processes to keep the neuron functioning properly.
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  • What Is the Significance of Mitosis?

    Q: What Is the Significance of Mitosis?

    A: Mitosis' significance is cell division, which enables an organism to grow and reproduce. During mitosis, a single cell divides and produces two identical daughter cells. Each cell contains the same genetic material and chromosome number as the original cell.
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