Botany

A:

Plantae is a large and diverse kingdom which includes all of the trees, grasses, ferns and mosses in the world. All plants are eukaryotes, with nucleated cells and organelles such as mitochondria and chloroplasts. Their cells have distinct cellulose walls that other organisms lack. All plants are descended from a common ancestor.

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  • What Is the Function of a Flower's Style?

    Q: What Is the Function of a Flower's Style?

    A: In plants, the style is the long, slender stalk that connects the stigma to the ovary. The stigma is where the pollen is deposited, and the ovary is at the bottom of the style and houses the plant's ovules, which contain the egg cells. The function of the style is to check compatibility and judge whether the pollen that lands on the flower can fertilize the plant.
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  • What Is the Difference Between an Aspen and a Birch Tree?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between an Aspen and a Birch Tree?

    A: Birch trees and aspen trees have a similar appearance, but possess significant differences, specifically in their leaves, buds, bark and abilities to tolerate extreme climates. Additionally, while aspen trees are found across the country, birch trees are primarily found only in the eastern United States and areas of Canada, according to Garden Guides.
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  • What Is the Scientific Name for Bamboo?

    Q: What Is the Scientific Name for Bamboo?

    A: There are many species of bamboo, and their scientific names include phyllostachys, bambusa, chusquea, borinda, fargesia and himalayacalmus. Other species are brachystachyum, chimonobambusa, dendrocalamus and schizostachyum.
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  • What Is the Function of Cellulose?

    Q: What Is the Function of Cellulose?

    A: Cellulose makes up most of the tough cell walls surrounding plant cells and enables plants to stand upright, according to Education Portal. It is the major component of plants that makes the branches, stems and leaves very strong.
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  • What Are the Five Stages of Seed Germination?

    Q: What Are the Five Stages of Seed Germination?

    A: Seed germination begins when the first root breaks through the seed wall and ends when the first pair of true leaves begin the process of photosynthesis. The three stages in-between are when the primary root, which is called the radicle, develops root hairs, the first young shoot rises emerges from the soil and the first pair of true leaves form to begin to manufacture food for the plant.
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  • Where Does Carbon Dioxide Come From?

    Q: Where Does Carbon Dioxide Come From?

    A: Carbon dioxide is generated through the oxidation of carbon or carbon compounds, including combustion and cellular respiration. Carbon dioxide is also released into the atmosphere when water thaws, as well as during volcanic eruptions. While many fear its theorized effects on global temperatures, carbon dioxide is absolutely essential to the vast majority of life on Earth.
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  • What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Cross Pollination?

    Q: What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Cross Pollination?

    A: There are many advantages and disadvantages of cross pollination in plants. One such advantage is adding genetic diversity to the species. However, for someone who wants to protect the purity of the plant's genetic pool, than this can be a disadvantage as well.
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  • Why Is Chloroplast Important?

    Q: Why Is Chloroplast Important?

    A: Chloroplasts are important because they are the sites where photosynthesis occurs. Photosynthesis is the process in which chemical energy is obtained by converting solar energy.
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  • Why Do We Need Plants?

    Q: Why Do We Need Plants?

    A: Plants are necessary because they are a primary food source and provide the oxygen that is vital to animals' and humans' existence. A majority of the calories that people consume comes from plants, and most meat comes from animals that eat plants. Plants are at the bottom of the food chain, and animals could not survive without them. Plants also release the oxygen that humans and animals breathe.
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  • Why Do Sunflowers Face the Sun?

    Q: Why Do Sunflowers Face the Sun?

    A: No one knows why sunflowers track the sun, but scientists suspect that it may enhance the flower’s chances for pollination, increase the amount of heat the flower absorbs or accelerate the maturation of the sunflower seeds. Sunflowers achieve their movement through the differential growth rate of the cells in the stem. When the cells on the right side of the plant grow quickly, the flower head tilts the opposite direction.
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  • Why Don't Onion Cells Have Chloroplasts?

    Q: Why Don't Onion Cells Have Chloroplasts?

    A: Onion cells lack chloroplasts because the onion is part of the plant that is not involved in photosynthesis. The part of the plant eaten by humans is called the bulb, and it resides at the base of the plant. The bulb’s primary purpose is energy storage and holding the flower for the second growing season. Growing near the ground, the bulb is in poor position to collect sunlight.
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  • What Is Needed for Photosynthesis to Occur?

    Q: What Is Needed for Photosynthesis to Occur?

    A: For photosynthesis to occur, plants need sunlight, water, carbon dioxide and chlorophyll. Through the process of photosynthesis plants convert light energy into chemical energy. They use this energy to make food which they store as sugars.
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  • What Are the Raw Materials for Photosynthesis?

    Q: What Are the Raw Materials for Photosynthesis?

    A: The raw materials for photosynthesis are carbon dioxide and water. These are absorbed through the leaves of the plant or tree and allow the plant to produce oxygen and sugar.
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  • What Are Castor Beans?

    Q: What Are Castor Beans?

    A: Castor beans are seeds from the castor oil plant, also known as Ricinus communis. They are the source of castor oil and the poison ricin.
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  • What Is the Difference Between a Taproot and a Fibrous Root?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between a Taproot and a Fibrous Root?

    A: Plants with a taproot system are usually deep rooted while fibrous roots are much shorter, and are densely packed fine roots. The taproot system allows plants to anchor better, get sources of minerals and water from further into the ground than fibrous rooted plants. The fibrous system is more susceptible to drought; however, it also allows the plant to respond faster to an application of fertilizer.
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  • What Are the Two Stages of Photosynthesis Called?

    Q: What Are the Two Stages of Photosynthesis Called?

    A: Photosynthesis takes place in two stages: the light reactions and the dark reactions. The light reactions take their name because they require the presence of direct light, while the dark reactions do not have the same proviso. Light reactions occur in the thylakoid stacks in the grana for the most part, while dark reactions do not, although they also most frequently happen during the daytime.
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  • What Is Photosynthesis?

    Q: What Is Photosynthesis?

    A: Photosynthesis is the process by which green plants manufacture their own food. The process takes place in small structures within the plant’s cells called chloroplasts. Photosynthesis evolved about 3 billion years ago, yet it remains the most important method for harvesting the sun’s energy on the planet.
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  • How Does a Cactus Make Its Own Food?

    Q: How Does a Cactus Make Its Own Food?

    A: Cacti produce their food through photosynthesis that occurs in their pads, which are modified stems. Evolution has modified their leaves into spines that provide shade for the pads and break up the wind to reduce evaporation through the skin of the stems.
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  • Who Discovered Plastids?

    Q: Who Discovered Plastids?

    A: The term "plastid" was coined by German biologist Ernst Haeckel in a paper he presented in 1866, but the term was too vague. In 1883, fellow German Andreas Schimper was the first to provide a clear definition to "plastid" and note the relationship between different types.
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  • Which Flower Blooms for One Day?

    Q: Which Flower Blooms for One Day?

    A: The tropical hibiscus and hibiscus flowers feature one-day blooms followed by death. The Virginia spiderwort and daylilies are two other types of plants that also present blooms lasting only one day.
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  • What Is the Function of Leaves?

    Q: What Is the Function of Leaves?

    A: The function of leaves is to help the plant produce food by converting the energy in sunlight into chemical energy that the plant can eat. The structures within the leaf convert the energy and make it possible for the plant to get food.
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