Botany

A:

The middle of a flower consists of the female reproductive organs - the stigma, a style and one or more ovules. The ovary is located at the base of the flower.

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  • How do plants survive in the desert?

    Q: How do plants survive in the desert?

    A: Desert plants have special adaptations that allow them to survive the harsh environment in which they live. DesertUSA describes these adaptations as both "physical and behavioral mechanisms."
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  • What are characteristics of the kingdom Plantae?

    Q: What are characteristics of the kingdom Plantae?

    A: Plantae is a large and diverse kingdom which includes all of the trees, grasses, ferns and mosses in the world. All plants are eukaryotes, with nucleated cells and organelles such as mitochondria and chloroplasts. Their cells have distinct cellulose walls that other organisms lack. All plants are descended from a common ancestor.
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  • Where is starch stored within plants?

    Q: Where is starch stored within plants?

    A: Starch is stored primarily in the tubers of plants, according to Orthomolecular.org. It also can be found in the seeds, fruits and roots in the form of grains of varying size and shape.
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  • Can plants recognize their siblings?

    Q: Can plants recognize their siblings?

    A: Some people think if you've seen one mustard plant, you've seen them all, but that isn't true. If plants could talk, they would tell you that they are able to recognize their siblings, or seeds that have grown from the same mother plant. Additionally, the plants will show preferential treatment toward its kin.
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  • What are the five stages of seed germination?

    Q: What are the five stages of seed germination?

    A: Seed germination begins when the first root breaks through the seed wall and ends when the first pair of true leaves begin the process of photosynthesis. The three stages in-between are when the primary root, which is called the radicle, develops root hairs, the first young shoot rises emerges from the soil and the first pair of true leaves form to begin to manufacture food for the plant.
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  • What are the three parts of a seed?

    Q: What are the three parts of a seed?

    A: The three parts of a seed are the embryo, the endosperm and the seed coat. The embryo is a miniature form of the plant that is fed by the nutrition contained in the endosperm. The embryo is protected from the external environment by the seed coat.
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  • What is the function of a flower?

    Q: What is the function of a flower?

    A: The purpose of a flower is to attract pollinators to a plant to aid in fertilization so that the plant creates seeds. Bright colors, strong scents and sweet nectar all work together to attract birds, bees and other insects to move pollen from one flower to another. After pollination occurs, the flower develops seeds.
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  • Why are chloroplasts green?

    Q: Why are chloroplasts green?

    A: Chloroplasts, the parts of plant cells responsible for photosynthesis, are green because they contain the pigment chlorophyll, which absorbs the red and blue wavelengths of light and reflects back the green wavelengths. Chlorophyll absorbs particular colors of light to provide the right amount of energy for photosynthesis to take place. Photosynthesis is the process by which plants use the energy from the sun to convert carbon dioxide from the air into carbohydrates for food.
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  • How many chromosomes do potatoes have?

    Q: How many chromosomes do potatoes have?

    A: Potatoes have 48 chromosomes that are arranged into 24 pairs. The number of chromosomes in living organisms, including plants, flowers and vegetables, varies widely. Some, such as the garden onion, have only 16 chromosomes, while other species like ferns, have over 100 pairs of chromosomes.
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  • How are fungi and plants similar?

    Q: How are fungi and plants similar?

    A: Plants and fungi are both eukaryotic organisms whose cells are buffered by cellulose walls. Like plants, some fungi can be used as food and medicine, and they are alike in their relative lack of mobility.
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  • What is the function of chloroplasts?

    Q: What is the function of chloroplasts?

    A: The function of chloroplasts is to convert sunlight, water and carbon dioxide into food for the plant. Chloroplasts are energy organelles, and are present in all types of plants.
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  • Why don't onion cells have chloroplasts?

    Q: Why don't onion cells have chloroplasts?

    A: Onion cells lack chloroplasts because the onion is part of the plant that is not involved in photosynthesis. The part of the plant eaten by humans is called the bulb, and it resides at the base of the plant. The bulb’s primary purpose is energy storage and holding the flower for the second growing season. Growing near the ground, the bulb is in poor position to collect sunlight.
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  • How do plants absorb carbon dioxide?

    Q: How do plants absorb carbon dioxide?

    A: Plants absorb carbon dioxide from the air, through the stomata present in their leaves. Stomata are small holes that are present in the underside of leaves.
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  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of cross pollination?

    Q: What are the advantages and disadvantages of cross pollination?

    A: There are many advantages and disadvantages of cross pollination in plants. One such advantage is adding genetic diversity to the species. However, for someone who wants to protect the purity of the plant's genetic pool, than this can be a disadvantage as well.
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  • Are plants prokaryotic or eukaryotic?

    Q: Are plants prokaryotic or eukaryotic?

    A: Plants are eukaryotes, with their DNA contained in a membrane-bound nucleus along with other membrane-bound organelles, such as mitochondria, chloroplasts and vacuoles. Their chloroplasts give them the ability to generate energy and carbohydrates from water, sunlight and carbon dioxide.
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  • What are some adaptations of the water lily?

    Q: What are some adaptations of the water lily?

    A: The adaptations of the water lily include the wide, flat leaves, the thorns on the bottom of the leaves, the rims around the leaves and the short lifespan of the flower. These specific adaptations allow the water lily to survive in its environment.
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  • What is needed for photosynthesis to occur?

    Q: What is needed for photosynthesis to occur?

    A: For photosynthesis to occur, plants need sunlight, water, carbon dioxide and chlorophyll. Through the process of photosynthesis plants convert light energy into chemical energy. They use this energy to make food which they store as sugars.
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  • What are some examples of aquatic plants?

    Q: What are some examples of aquatic plants?

    A: Examples of aquatic plants include the water lily, Victorian water lily, frog-bit, floating heart, pondweed, water-shield, yellow pond-lily, cape-pondweed and water-chestnut. Also referred to as aquatic macrophytes or hydrophytes, aquatic plants are plants that are adapted to live in water or aquatic environment.
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  • Who discovered plastids?

    Q: Who discovered plastids?

    A: The term "plastid" was coined by German biologist Ernst Haeckel in a paper he presented in 1866, but the term was too vague. In 1883, fellow German Andreas Schimper was the first to provide a clear definition to "plastid" and note the relationship between different types.
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  • What is an example of a non-green plant?

    Q: What is an example of a non-green plant?

    A: One common example of a non-green plant is Monotropa uniflora, or Indian Pipe. This completely white member of the blueberry family gets its color from a lack of chlorophyll, or the molecule that synthesizes sugar from sunlight and carbon dioxide.
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  • What is the role of chlorophyll in photosynthesis?

    Q: What is the role of chlorophyll in photosynthesis?

    A: Chlorophyll is a pigment found in the chloroplasts of plants that absorbs the wavelengths of light required to convert water and carbon dioxide into chemical energy during photosynthesis. Molecules of chlorophyll are arranged around the photosystems embedded in the chloroplasts' thylakoid membranes. There can be several hundred chlorophyll molecules per photosystem.
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