Botany

A:

A photosystem is an aggregate of protein structures in the thylakoid membranes of plants that aids in photosynthesis. It absorbs light energy and transfers electrons onto a reaction center. Thylakoid membranes are found in the plant chloroplasts.

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  • What Are the Characteristics of Plants?

    Q: What Are the Characteristics of Plants?

    A: Plants are eukaryotic, meaning their cells have a nucleus. They form tissues, have multiple cells and create food through photosynthesis, which is the process of turning sunlight into energy.
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  • What Are the Four Things Needed for Photosynthesis?

    Q: What Are the Four Things Needed for Photosynthesis?

    A: Photosynthesis can only occur when a plant has access to water, carbon dioxide, sunlight and chlorophyll. Plant cells naturally produce chlorophyll, and they draw carbon dioxide directly from the air. Water and sunlight must be acquired from external sources.
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  • Why Do Sunflowers Face the Sun?

    Q: Why Do Sunflowers Face the Sun?

    A: No one knows why sunflowers track the sun, but scientists suspect that it may enhance the flower’s chances for pollination, increase the amount of heat the flower absorbs or accelerate the maturation of the sunflower seeds. Sunflowers achieve their movement through the differential growth rate of the cells in the stem. When the cells on the right side of the plant grow quickly, the flower head tilts the opposite direction.
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  • What Is a Photosystem?

    Q: What Is a Photosystem?

    A: A photosystem is an aggregate of protein structures in the thylakoid membranes of plants that aids in photosynthesis. It absorbs light energy and transfers electrons onto a reaction center. Thylakoid membranes are found in the plant chloroplasts.
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  • What Determines a Fruit From a Vegetable?

    Q: What Determines a Fruit From a Vegetable?

    A: The difference between fruits and vegetables depends on whether the botanical or culinary definition is used. In botanical terms, a fruit is a seed-filled structure that develops from a flowering plant. Every other part of a plant, including the roots, leaves and stems, is considered a vegetable. In culinary terms, fruits that are savory are referred to as vegetables.
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  • What Is Needed for Photosynthesis to Occur?

    Q: What Is Needed for Photosynthesis to Occur?

    A: For photosynthesis to occur, plants need sunlight, water, carbon dioxide and chlorophyll. Through the process of photosynthesis plants convert light energy into chemical energy. They use this energy to make food which they store as sugars.
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  • What Is the Reproductive Part of a Plant Called?

    Q: What Is the Reproductive Part of a Plant Called?

    A: A plant's flower contains its reproductive components. The plant male reproductive organs are called stamens, and the plant female reproductive organs are called carpels, or a pistil.
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  • What Is the Function of Leaves?

    Q: What Is the Function of Leaves?

    A: The function of leaves is to help the plant produce food by converting the energy in sunlight into chemical energy that the plant can eat. The structures within the leaf convert the energy and make it possible for the plant to get food.
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  • Why Is Photosynthesis Important to Humans?

    Q: Why Is Photosynthesis Important to Humans?

    A: Photosynthesis produces glucose and oxygen. These are both required by humans for the process of respiration, which is how humans make the energy required to perform all cellular activities. Without access to the products of photosynthesis, the human race would cease to exist.
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  • What Is the Primary Difference Between Fungi and Plants?

    Q: What Is the Primary Difference Between Fungi and Plants?

    A: The main difference between fungi and plants is one of biological origin: fungi and plants have different DNA sequences and cell structures, and the DNA composition and cell format of fungi are more closely related to those of animals than plants. Fungi and plants share few traits beyond the inability to move. While plants make their own food using photosynthesis, fungi require external sources of nutrients and food particles to survive.
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  • What Are the Accessory Pigments and What Are Their Functions?

    Q: What Are the Accessory Pigments and What Are Their Functions?

    A: Accessory pigments are pigments in plant leaves other than chlorophyll a that assist in the process of photosynthesis. Accessory pigments function by extending the range of light wavelengths that a plant absorbs. Accessory pigments give plants unique colors.
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  • What Is the Difference Between a Jungle and a Rain Forest?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between a Jungle and a Rain Forest?

    A: A jungle is a densely overgrown area while a rain forest is a densely overgrown area with overhead canopies formed by tall trees that prevent light from entering. A rain forest is a type of jungle.
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  • What Are the Two Stages of Photosynthesis Called?

    Q: What Are the Two Stages of Photosynthesis Called?

    A: Photosynthesis takes place in two stages: the light reactions and the dark reactions. The light reactions take their name because they require the presence of direct light, while the dark reactions do not have the same proviso. Light reactions occur in the thylakoid stacks in the grana for the most part, while dark reactions do not, although they also most frequently happen during the daytime.
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  • What Are Examples of Monocot and Dicot Seeds?

    Q: What Are Examples of Monocot and Dicot Seeds?

    A: Examples of monocot seeds include garlic, onion, corn, wheat, asparagus, and orchids. Examples of dicot seeds include tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, beans, peas, clovers, apples and celery.
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  • Are Plants Prokaryotic or Eukaryotic?

    Q: Are Plants Prokaryotic or Eukaryotic?

    A: Plants are eukaryotes, with their DNA contained in a membrane-bound nucleus along with other membrane-bound organelles, such as mitochondria, chloroplasts and vacuoles. Their chloroplasts give them the ability to generate energy and carbohydrates from water, sunlight and carbon dioxide.
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  • What Eats Moss?

    Q: What Eats Moss?

    A: Low-altitude pikas survive by eating moss, but very few other animals can do so because moss is a very poor-quality food, says National Geographic. Fairfax County Public Schools reports that a few small mites and crustaceans eat moss, but most small animals use it as shelter material rather than food.
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  • How Do Plants Adapt to Their Environment?

    Q: How Do Plants Adapt to Their Environment?

    A: Plants adapt to the environment by modifying their leaves, stem and roots. Desert plants such as the cactus modify their leaves into thorns to prevent loss of moisture through transpiration. Plants such as the lotus grow in water, have modified stems with pores and have short roots.
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  • Is Fungi Prokaryotic or Eukaryotic?

    Q: Is Fungi Prokaryotic or Eukaryotic?

    A: Fungi are eukaryotic organisms that comprise one of the kingdoms of life. Most fungi are multicellular. As eukaryotic organisms, fungi possess cells with organelles, which are structures surrounded by membranes.
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  • Where Do Venus Flytraps Live?

    Q: Where Do Venus Flytraps Live?

    A: Venus flytraps live in acid-rich soils mixed with drainage materials and are mostly restricted to specific regions of North Carolina and South Carolina. They can be cultivated at home in a substrate consisting of 65 percent sphagnum moss and 35 percent sand.
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  • Where Do Mahogany Trees Grow?

    Q: Where Do Mahogany Trees Grow?

    A: True mahogany trees, scientific name Swietenia mahogani, are endemic to the humid, tropical environments of the Americas. Mahogany is most abundant in the Amazon basin, parts of Central America and various humid locations in Mexico, such as the Yucatan peninsula.
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  • What Are the Five Stages of Seed Germination?

    Q: What Are the Five Stages of Seed Germination?

    A: Seed germination begins when the first root breaks through the seed wall and ends when the first pair of true leaves begin the process of photosynthesis. The three stages in-between are when the primary root, which is called the radicle, develops root hairs, the first young shoot rises emerges from the soil and the first pair of true leaves form to begin to manufacture food for the plant.
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