Botany

A:

Venus flytraps live in acid-rich soils mixed with drainage materials and are mostly restricted to specific regions of North Carolina and South Carolina. They can be cultivated at home in a substrate consisting of 65 percent sphagnum moss and 35 percent sand.

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  • What Do All Plants Have in Common?

    Q: What Do All Plants Have in Common?

    A: All true plants are multicellular eukaryotes and members of the Kingdom Plantae. All plants extract a majority of their energy autotrophically from sunlight through a process known as photosynthesis.
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  • Why Do We Need Plants?

    Q: Why Do We Need Plants?

    A: Plants are necessary because they are a primary food source and provide the oxygen that is vital to animals' and humans' existence. A majority of the calories that people consume comes from plants, and most meat comes from animals that eat plants. Plants are at the bottom of the food chain, and animals could not survive without them. Plants also release the oxygen that humans and animals breathe.
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  • Where Do Blueberries Grow?

    Q: Where Do Blueberries Grow?

    A: Blueberries grow in acidic soils that are rich in organic material. Wild blueberries are generally found in woodland areas in most parts of North America. Commercially grown blueberries are found in the agricultural regions of both North and South America.
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  • What Are the Four Things Needed for Photosynthesis?

    Q: What Are the Four Things Needed for Photosynthesis?

    A: Photosynthesis can only occur when a plant has access to water, carbon dioxide, sunlight and chlorophyll. Plant cells naturally produce chlorophyll, and they draw carbon dioxide directly from the air. Water and sunlight must be acquired from external sources.
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  • What Is the Function of a Plant Cell's Nucleus?

    Q: What Is the Function of a Plant Cell's Nucleus?

    A: A plant cell's nucleus is responsible for storing the plant's genetic information and controlling the plant's activities. These activities include growth, cell division, metabolism and protein synthesis.
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  • How Do Plants Adapt to Their Environment?

    Q: How Do Plants Adapt to Their Environment?

    A: Plants adapt to the environment by modifying their leaves, stem and roots. Desert plants such as the cactus modify their leaves into thorns to prevent loss of moisture through transpiration. Plants such as the lotus grow in water, have modified stems with pores and have short roots.
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  • Where Do Venus Flytraps Live?

    Q: Where Do Venus Flytraps Live?

    A: Venus flytraps live in acid-rich soils mixed with drainage materials and are mostly restricted to specific regions of North Carolina and South Carolina. They can be cultivated at home in a substrate consisting of 65 percent sphagnum moss and 35 percent sand.
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  • What Is the Difference Between a Taproot and a Fibrous Root?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between a Taproot and a Fibrous Root?

    A: Plants with a taproot system are usually deep rooted while fibrous roots are much shorter, and are densely packed fine roots. The taproot system allows plants to anchor better, get sources of minerals and water from further into the ground than fibrous rooted plants. The fibrous system is more susceptible to drought; however, it also allows the plant to respond faster to an application of fertilizer.
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  • Which Flower Blooms for One Day?

    Q: Which Flower Blooms for One Day?

    A: The tropical hibiscus and hibiscus flowers feature one-day blooms followed by death. The Virginia spiderwort and daylilies are two other types of plants that also present blooms lasting only one day.
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  • Can Plants Recognize Their Siblings?

    Q: Can Plants Recognize Their Siblings?

    A: Some people think if you've seen one mustard plant, you've seen them all, but that isn't true. If plants could talk, they would tell you that they are able to recognize their siblings, or seeds that have grown from the same mother plant. Additionally, the plants will show preferential treatment toward its kin.
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  • What Determines a Fruit From a Vegetable?

    Q: What Determines a Fruit From a Vegetable?

    A: The difference between fruits and vegetables depends on whether the botanical or culinary definition is used. In botanical terms, a fruit is a seed-filled structure that develops from a flowering plant. Every other part of a plant, including the roots, leaves and stems, is considered a vegetable. In culinary terms, fruits that are savory are referred to as vegetables.
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  • What Is the Difference Between a Jungle and a Rain Forest?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between a Jungle and a Rain Forest?

    A: A jungle is a densely overgrown area while a rain forest is a densely overgrown area with overhead canopies formed by tall trees that prevent light from entering. A rain forest is a type of jungle.
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  • What Percent of the Sun's Energy Do Plants Use?

    Q: What Percent of the Sun's Energy Do Plants Use?

    A: For photosynthesis, plants use approximately 0.023 percent of sunlight energy. This is a very small percentage that plants need to make food when compared to the water cycle’s use of solar energy, which is 23 percent.
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  • What Is the Function of the Stem?

    Q: What Is the Function of the Stem?

    A: A stem has several functions, including support, conducting water, storing water, producing food and facilitating asexual reproduction. The stem connects the plant's leaves and flowers to its roots. Along with water, the stem carries products from photosynthesis and nutrients to the roots and leaves. It engages in food production through photosynthesis, and it also stores the products made during photosynthesis.
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  • Why Do Sunflowers Face the Sun?

    Q: Why Do Sunflowers Face the Sun?

    A: No one knows why sunflowers track the sun, but scientists suspect that it may enhance the flower’s chances for pollination, increase the amount of heat the flower absorbs or accelerate the maturation of the sunflower seeds. Sunflowers achieve their movement through the differential growth rate of the cells in the stem. When the cells on the right side of the plant grow quickly, the flower head tilts the opposite direction.
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  • What Is the Waste Product of Photosynthesis?

    Q: What Is the Waste Product of Photosynthesis?

    A: Photosynthesis, which is the process through which some living organisms, including most plants and some fungi, make their own food, produces oxygen as a waste product. The process of photosynthesis in plants is the reverse of the respiration process in humans. While humans breathe in oxygen and expel carbon dioxide, plants ingest carbon dioxide and dispel oxygen.
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  • What Are the Five Stages of Seed Germination?

    Q: What Are the Five Stages of Seed Germination?

    A: Seed germination begins when the first root breaks through the seed wall and ends when the first pair of true leaves begin the process of photosynthesis. The three stages in-between are when the primary root, which is called the radicle, develops root hairs, the first young shoot rises emerges from the soil and the first pair of true leaves form to begin to manufacture food for the plant.
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  • How Do Plants Reproduce?

    Q: How Do Plants Reproduce?

    A: Plants either reproduce sexually or asexually, depending on the type of plant. In sexual reproduction, two germ cells, or gametes, fuse to create the beginning of a genetically unique offspring. In asexual reproduction, a plant cell splits in two to create a genetically identical offspring.
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  • How Do Plants Get Nitrogen?

    Q: How Do Plants Get Nitrogen?

    A: Plants obtain nitrogen through the Nitrogen cycle. Air consists of 78 percent nitrogen, which is in the form of nitrous oxides. Rain water dissolves these oxides and nitrogen enters the soil, which plants then absorb by drawing in water through the roots.
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  • How Are Plants Adapted to Live in Dry Conditions?

    Q: How Are Plants Adapted to Live in Dry Conditions?

    A: Plants adapt to dry conditions in a variety of ways, but many respond to dry conditions by storing large quantities of water, which can be used in times of need. For example, cactuses store water in their trunks and stems, while aloe plants store water in their leaves. Additionally, plants that live in dry areas often evolve thick outer cuticles that can help retard the rate of water loss.
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  • What Is the Scientific Name for Bamboo?

    Q: What Is the Scientific Name for Bamboo?

    A: There are many species of bamboo, and their scientific names include phyllostachys, bambusa, chusquea, borinda, fargesia and himalayacalmus. Other species are brachystachyum, chimonobambusa, dendrocalamus and schizostachyum.
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