Blood

A:

According to For Dummies, deoxygenated blood is blood that has no oxygen. Blood becomes deoxygenated after receiving carbon dioxide in exchange for carbon dioxide, which occurs at the cell membrane during respiration and circulation.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • Could a Man With an AB Blood Type Be the Father of a Child With Type O Blood?

    Q: Could a Man With an AB Blood Type Be the Father of a Child With Type O Blood?

    A: A man with type AB blood cannot be the father of a child with type O blood. A child with type O blood would have to get the O allele from both its father and mother.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Causes Capillaries to Dilate?

    Q: What Causes Capillaries to Dilate?

    A: Dilated capillaries are caused by a variety of factors, including radiation, sun damage, pregnancy, unbalanced estrogen levels and rosacea, according to Care Fair. They may also be caused by prescription medications or autoimmune diseases. Lifestyle factors like heavy drinking, smoking, or harsh scrubbing of the face can also cause dilated capillaries. Occasionally, dilated capillaries may appear in skin without medical problems due to heredity or the natural aging process, according to Dr. David Green.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Much Is One Unit of Blood?

    Q: How Much Is One Unit of Blood?

    A: A unit of blood is equivalent to approximately 1 pint or 450 milliliters, according to the Canadian Blood Services website. The average patient requires around 4.6 units of blood.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Happens When Blood Reaches the Lungs?

    Q: What Happens When Blood Reaches the Lungs?

    A: Blood that reaches the lungs travels throughout a network of small blood vessels, where oxygen moves into the blood and carbon dioxide moves out of the blood, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. This oxygen-rich blood is transported through the pulmonary veins and back to the heart, where it is pumped out to the rest of the body.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is Hematopoiesis?

    Q: What Is Hematopoiesis?

    A: Hematopoiesis is defined as the process of blood cell production, multiplication and specialization in the bone marrow. This process typically starts with the most basic blood cells, called stem cells according to Austin Peay State University.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Function of Glucose in the Human Body?

    Q: What Is the Function of Glucose in the Human Body?

    A: Glucose provides a source of energy for the human body. Experts from Georgia State University say glucose is the most important simple sugar used for human metabolism.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Function of Hemoglobin?

    Q: What Is the Function of Hemoglobin?

    A: InnovateUs states that the main function of hemoglobin is transporting oxygen from the lungs to other parts of the body. It is an important chemical in red blood cells that carries oxygen, and performs different effect modulation and gas transport duties.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Often Does Blood Circulate Through the Body?

    Q: How Often Does Blood Circulate Through the Body?

    A: According to Santa Barbara City College, for an average person, the entire volume of blood in the circulatory system is pumped through the heart approximately once per minute. The average person has 5 liters of blood in their circulatory system and a cardiac output of 4.9 liters per minute.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Are the Smallest Arteries Called?

    Q: What Are the Smallest Arteries Called?

    A: The smallest arteries in the body are called arterioles. Arterioles are blood vessels that help to regulate the volume of oxygenated blood available in the capillaries that supply it to tissues and cells.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why Does Blood Smell Like Metal?

    Q: Why Does Blood Smell Like Metal?

    A: Owing to its iron content, human blood smells like metal to many people. In fact, when people rub their skin along certain iron-containing objects, such as coins, perspiration reacts with the iron to produce a metallic smell, according to LiveScience.com.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is Deoxygenated Blood?

    Q: What Is Deoxygenated Blood?

    A: According to For Dummies, deoxygenated blood is blood that has no oxygen. Blood becomes deoxygenated after receiving carbon dioxide in exchange for carbon dioxide, which occurs at the cell membrane during respiration and circulation.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Structure of Arteries?

    Q: What Is the Structure of Arteries?

    A: Arteries have three main layers or tunics known as the adventitia (outer), media (middle) and intima (inner). The outer layer is made of connective tissue with collagen fibers, the middle layer consists of smooth muscle and elastic fibers, and the innermost layer is composed of specialized squamous cells supported by the basement membrane of connective tissue.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Difference Between Warm-Blooded and Cold-Blooded Animals?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Warm-Blooded and Cold-Blooded Animals?

    A: The difference between warm-blooded and cold-blooded animals involves the body temperature of the animal. Birds and mammals have warm blood and attempt to keep their internal parts at a set temperature. In a colder environment, their bodies create heat, and when they are in a warmer environment, their bodies cool themselves. Cold-blooded animals have the same temperature as their environment.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why Does Rigor Mortis Occur?

    Q: Why Does Rigor Mortis Occur?

    A: Rigor mortis occurs because, after death, the muscles of the body partially contract, but they are unable to return to their relaxed state. About.com further explains that this causes the muscles to become fixed in place for around 72 hours.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Does "positive" Mean Regarding Your Blood Type?

    Q: What Does "positive" Mean Regarding Your Blood Type?

    A: The American Pregnancy Association explains that the presence or lack of the Rh factor determines whether a blood type is positive or negative. The Rh factor is an antigen and a protein type located on the surface of red blood cells that causes an immune system response. When individuals have the Rh factor, their blood is Rh-positive. When they do not have it, their blood is Rh-negative.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Can Your Blood Group Change?

    Q: Can Your Blood Group Change?

    A: In-vivo, the blood group of a person is dictated by genetics and cannot be changed, according to Dr. Mehmet Oz, a professor of surgery at the Columbia University. The reported blood group changes are likely caused by a testing error during the initial test.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Smallest Blood Vessel in the Body?

    Q: What Is the Smallest Blood Vessel in the Body?

    A: The smallest blood vessels in the human body are capillaries, which connect arteries and veins. Capillaries can be as small as 5 micrometers wide. The average adult body has about 10 billion capillaries.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Which Type of Blood Cells Carry Waste Away From Cells?

    Q: Which Type of Blood Cells Carry Waste Away From Cells?

    A: Red blood cells carry waste from the cells to the lungs. Once this happens, the lungs remove the waste from the body by exhalation.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Difference Between Arterial and Venous Blood?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Arterial and Venous Blood?

    A: In the strictest sense, blood that is being carried toward the heart is venous, while blood being carried away from the heart is arterial, according to Dictionary.com. However, with the exception of the blood carried by the pulmonary arteries and veins, blood in the arteries also carries more oxygen than blood in the veins.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Causes Blood Vessels to Break?

    Q: What Causes Blood Vessels to Break?

    A: The breaking of blood vessels can be caused by trauma, various medical conditions or disease, states Reference.com. The most common cause of blood vessels breaking and bruising (discoloration due to bleeding into the skin) is trauma to the body.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Fast Does the Body Replace Blood?

    Q: How Fast Does the Body Replace Blood?

    A: Different components of human blood are replaced at different rates. According to the AABB, a non-profit organization that represents organizations that conduct blood transfusions, plasma is replaced within a few hours of a blood donation while the red blood cells take a few weeks to replace. Doctors usually only remove about one pint of blood during a transfusion, which represents about 10 percent of the total blood volume.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:

Explore Human Anatomy