Biology

A:

There is no proven method that speeds up the growth of chest hair. The rate of hair growth in any individual is largely based on genetics.

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  • What Are the Negative and Positive Effects of Urbanization?

    Q: What Are the Negative and Positive Effects of Urbanization?

    A: Some benefits of urbanization are economies of scale, better transportation, better opportunities for housing and education, better medical care, increased job opportunities and greater access to goods. However, urbanization also has some negative effects, such as traffic, violence, increased pollution, diseases and physical inactivity.
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  • A Few Examples of Parasitism

    Q: A Few Examples of Parasitism

    A: Parasitism is a type of symbiosis where one partner benefits at the expense of another. It takes many forms and is common throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. A few examples are examined below.
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  • What Are the Seven Classifications in Science?

    Q: What Are the Seven Classifications in Science?

    A: The seven classifications of science are kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus and species. These classifications are nested; for instance, organisms must be in the same kingdom to be in the same phylum.
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  • What Are Examples of Prokaryotic Organisms?

    Q: What Are Examples of Prokaryotic Organisms?

    A: Bacteria are some of the best examples of prokaryotic organisms. These organisms do not have a membrane-bound nucleus and lack the well-distinguished cell features found in eukaryotes.
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  • What Causes Siamese Twins?

    Q: What Causes Siamese Twins?

    A: The exact cause of Siamese twins, more accurately known as conjoined twins, is not entirely known. Since the prevalence of conjoined twins is thought to be higher in southeast Asian and African populations than in Caucasian populations, Sciences 360 suggests that environmental or genetic factors may play some role in the formation of conjoined twins.
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  • What Is the Function of Chlorophyll?

    Q: What Is the Function of Chlorophyll?

    A: Chlorophyll’s function in plants is to absorb light and transfer it through the plant during photosynthesis. The chlorophyll in a plant is found on the thylakoids in the chloroplasts.
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  • What Is the Difference Between "heterozygous" and "homozygous"?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between "heterozygous" and "homozygous"?

    A: In genetics, the term "heterozygous" describes an allele with a differing gene pair; "homozygous" refers to an allele with identical genes. Alleles determine the expression of gene traits.
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  • What Are the Harmful Effects of Microorganisms?

    Q: What Are the Harmful Effects of Microorganisms?

    A: While not every microorganism is dangerous, some microorganisms can cause disease and infections in humans and other living things. Microorganisms, also called microbes, also contribute to decomposition and spoilage of food, and they can leave toxic waste products behind even if they are eradicated from the contaminated material.
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  • What Are the Two Main Types of Anaerobic Respiration?

    Q: What Are the Two Main Types of Anaerobic Respiration?

    A: The two main types of anaerobic respiration are alcoholic fermentation and lactic acid fermentation. These methods of respiration occur when the amount of oxygen available is too low to support aerobic respiration.
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  • What Is an Example of a Saprophyte?

    Q: What Is an Example of a Saprophyte?

    A: Some examples of saprophytes are the bacteria which subsist on human waste, the ink cap mushroom and non-photosynthetic plants, such as Indian pipe and gnome plant. Saprophyte is somewhat of an outdated name: fungi once termed saprophytes are now called saprobes, and plants once termed saprophytes are now called mycotrophic.
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  • What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of an Endoskeleton?

    Q: What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of an Endoskeleton?

    A: Advantages of an endoskeleton include strong weight-bearing properties and even growth, while disadvantages include less protection and leverage for muscles. Endoskeletons are generally found in larger animals due to better weight support, as exoskeletons can limit growth due to weight.
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  • What Are Some of the Primary Functions of Proteins?

    Q: What Are Some of the Primary Functions of Proteins?

    A: Some of the primary functions of proteins include their enabling the biochemical reactions that help digest food and respond to stimuli, replicating DNA and providing the structural building blocks for muscles, skin and other tissues. Acting as catalysts, enzymes are the protein-based molecules that play an important role in a wide range of organic processes. Proteins also help to transport nutrients and vital substances, one example being hemoglobin, which transports oxygen throughout the bloodstream.
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  • What Is an Example of a Parasitic Relationship?

    Q: What Is an Example of a Parasitic Relationship?

    A: An example of a parasitism relationship is that of ticks, fleas, lice or leeches on a host such as a human or dog. A parasitism relationship is where one of two plants or animals gains at the expense the other without killing it.
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  • Why Is PH Important to Living Organisms?

    Q: Why Is PH Important to Living Organisms?

    A: Living organisms depend on a proper balance of hydrogen and hydroxide ions in order to maintain essential physiological processes. Scientists use pH to express the concentration of hydrogen ions in a solution. Many organisms have tightly regulated systems to maintain the pH within the required range.
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  • How Long Does It Take to Grow Bamboo?

    Q: How Long Does It Take to Grow Bamboo?

    A: According to Bamboo Garden, the growth rate of bamboo depends on the specific type of bamboo, its location and the growing conditions. Ambient temperature has a significant impact on the maximum height of a bamboo plant. For example, a plant that reaches 30 feet in a chilly climate reaches twice that height in a hotter region.
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  • A Brief Guide to High Absolute Monocytes

    Q: A Brief Guide to High Absolute Monocytes

    A: Monocytes are a type of white blood cell produced in the bone marrow. Their main function is to fight infection. A high absolute monocyte count occurs as a result of chronic infection.
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  • What Is the Difference Between Anabolism and Catabolism?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Anabolism and Catabolism?

    A: Anabolism is a process in which the liver creates new proteins from digested nutrients, while catabolism involves the breaking down of proteins into essential amino acids. Both are vital to the body's metabolism and maintaining healthy cell function.
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  • What Is the Difference Between a Chrysalis and a Cocoon?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between a Chrysalis and a Cocoon?

    A: Chrysalis and cocoon are two physical objects that are made in the same phase of a butterfly or moth's life, however, a chrysalis refers to the casing that a butterfly makes when it transforms, whereas a cocoon is a woven case made by a moth during this stage to protect itself. The materials that a cocoon and a chrysalis are made of are also different.
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  • How Much Energy Is Lost at Each Trophic Level?

    Q: How Much Energy Is Lost at Each Trophic Level?

    A: According to the BBC, about 90 percent of the available energy in any trophic level is lost and becomes unavailable to higher trophic levels. For example, if the green plants in a habitat represent 1000 calories of food per square foot, the herbivores that eat these plants only represent about 100 calories per square foot. The predators that feed on these herbivores only represent about 10 calories per square foot.
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  • How Do Vestigial Structures Support Evolution?

    Q: How Do Vestigial Structures Support Evolution?

    A: Vestigial structures support the theory of evolution by adding observable evidence to the model of common ancestry. Vestigial structures are not necessarily without function. In fact, according to Austin Cline at About.com, it isn't possible to demonstrate that any anatomical feature serves no purpose. Instead, a vestigial structure is one that shows clear homology with a similar feature in related organisms but whose purpose is no longer clear.
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  • What Does a Symbiotic Relationship Mean?

    Q: What Does a Symbiotic Relationship Mean?

    A: A symbiotic relationship occurs when two organisms, individuals or groups of people work together by helping one another with the intent of getting help in return. In a symbiotic relationship, the two people or groups of people live together to provide the greatest benefits to one another.
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