Biology

A:

In a cell, proteins are made in the cell's ribosomes. Ribosomes string together long chains of amino acids to synthesize proteins. The mRNA (messenger ribonucleic acid), tRNA (transfer ribonucleic acid) and the amino acids work together to form proteins.

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  • What is a natural ecosystem?

    Q: What is a natural ecosystem?

    A: A natural ecosystem is an ecosystem that occurs as it would without the influence of human beings. The term “ecosystem” refers to all of the plants, animals, fungi, protozoans, bacteria and other organisms that live in the same area. All of these distinct species share highly interconnected lives and, in many ways, function as one unit.
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  • What is an example of a saprophyte?

    Q: What is an example of a saprophyte?

    A: Some examples of saprophytes are the bacteria which subsist on human waste, the ink cap mushroom and non-photosynthetic plants, such as Indian pipe and gnome plant. Saprophyte is somewhat of an outdated name: fungi once termed saprophytes are now called saprobes, and plants once termed saprophytes are now called mycotrophic.
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  • What are the branches of biological science?

    Q: What are the branches of biological science?

    A: There are multiple branches of biology, including agriculture, anatomy, genetics, biochemistry, botany and zoology. Each branch of biology studies a specific aspect of nature and living organisms.
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  • What is the difference between microbicidal and microbiostatic?

    Q: What is the difference between microbicidal and microbiostatic?

    A: A microbicidal agent kills microorganisms such as bacteria, while a microbiostatic agent only prohibits the growth of such microorganisms. In the presence of microbiostatics, the microorganisms eventually die due to lack of reproduction. Microbicidals are irreversible and lethal, while microbiostatics are reversible.
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  • Which food group do mushrooms fit into?

    Q: Which food group do mushrooms fit into?

    A: Mushrooms are fungi that grow in the dark and release spores to replicate themselves. Mushrooms are usually sold in the vegetable sections of grocery stores. However, they are not true vegetables because they do not have leaves, seeds or roots.
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  • What are some examples of saprophytic bacteria?

    Q: What are some examples of saprophytic bacteria?

    A: Examples of saprophytic bacteria include cheese mold, lactic acid, yeast and rotting kitchen waste. Saprophytic bacteria are fungal organisms that feed off of decaying organic matter. The term "saprophyte" refers specifically to fungal and bacterial saprotrophs, but animal saprotrophs are known as saprozoites.
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  • What is a systemic viral infection?

    Q: What is a systemic viral infection?

    A: A systemic viral infection occurs in many different systems or organs of the body, as opposed to a localized viral infection, which affects only one part or organ of the body. Because viruses are able to reproduce at a high rate, viral infections can spread quickly throughout the body.
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  • What is the list of motile bacteria?

    Q: What is the list of motile bacteria?

    A: Some bacteria that use flagellar movement include vibrio, spirillum, klebsiella, pseudomonas, azospirillum and salmonella. Bacteria that utilize spirochaetal movement include the borrelia, treponema, leptospira, cristispira and spirochaeta. A few examples of the gliding bacteria include achroonema, alysiella and cyanobacterium Oscillatoria. Bacteria motility falls under three categories: flagellar, spirochaetal and gliding.
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  • How do diatoms and dinoflagellates compare?

    Q: How do diatoms and dinoflagellates compare?

    A: Diatoms and dinoflagellates are both types of phytoplankton that live in oceans throughout the world, but they contain unique physical characteristics that make them easy to distinguish from one another. Diatoms and dinoflagellates fall into the broad category of phytoplankton. These two groups are the most common of all phytoplanktons and have single cells but vary in body size and shape.
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  • What is an example of a parasitic relationship?

    Q: What is an example of a parasitic relationship?

    A: An example of a parasitism relationship is that of ticks, fleas, lice or leeches on a host such as a human or dog. A parasitism relationship is where one of two plants or animals gains at the expense the other without killing it.
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  • Why are animals important?

    Q: Why are animals important?

    A: Animals are important for many reasons, including the assistance they give to plant ecosystems, the psychological and emotional support they can offer to humans, and the knowledge gained from the human study of them. Some of the most important animals include primates, bats and bees.
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  • What causes an enlarged thyroid?

    Q: What causes an enlarged thyroid?

    A: An enlarged thyroid gland can be caused by an iodine deficiency, Grave's disease or Hashimoto's disease, according to the Mayo Clinic. Other possible causes include thyroid nodules, pregnancy and thyroid cancer.
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  • How do viruses replicate?

    Q: How do viruses replicate?

    A: According to MedlinePlus, viruses replicate by invading normal cells and using those cells to produce viruses like themselves. Familiar infections caused by viruses include the common cold, warts and HIV/AIDS.
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  • How does glycogen function in living things?

    Q: How does glycogen function in living things?

    A: Glycogen is used as a mobile glucose storage device. The metabolism of glucose is one of the primary ways that the body gets the necessary energy for cells to function, according to "Biochemistry."
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  • What causes Siamese twins?

    Q: What causes Siamese twins?

    A: The exact cause of Siamese twins, more accurately known as conjoined twins, is not entirely known. Since the prevalence of conjoined twins is thought to be higher in southeast Asian and African populations than in Caucasian populations, Sciences 360 suggests that environmental or genetic factors may play some role in the formation of conjoined twins.
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  • What are the harmful effects of microorganisms?

    Q: What are the harmful effects of microorganisms?

    A: While not every microorganism is dangerous, some microorganisms can cause disease and infections in humans and other living things. Microorganisms, also called microbes, also contribute to decomposition and spoilage of food, and they can leave toxic waste products behind even if they are eradicated from the contaminated material.
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  • What is character displacement?

    Q: What is character displacement?

    A: Character displacement occurs when certain characteristics react to evolutionary factors and stimuli. This displacement allows closely related species to coexist in societies without creating different species, breeds or overgrowing the population of a species.
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  • What is the average IQ level?

    Q: What is the average IQ level?

    A: The average IQ score, by definition, is 100. People who take IQ tests are compared to each other, and the average score is placed at 100.
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  • What is an example of neutralism?

    Q: What is an example of neutralism?

    A: An example of neutralism is interaction between a rainbow trout and dandelion in a mountain valley or cacti and tarantulas living in the desert. Neutralism occurs when two populations interact without having an effect on the evolutionary fitness of each other.
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  • Why are decomposers important?

    Q: Why are decomposers important?

    A: Decomposers are important because they are crucial for the proper functioning of ecosystems. They recycle the minerals found in dead plants and animals back into the food chain. Ecosystems do not waste energy or materials, and as such, the decomposers capitalize on any remaining energy in a dead organism and make the minerals available to the entire biome.
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  • How do protists affect humans?

    Q: How do protists affect humans?

    A: Protists are primitive single-celled organisms, some of which cause human diseases. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, four basic types of protozoans afflict humans, which are classified in the groups Sarcodina, Mastigophora, Ciliophora and Sporozoa.
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