Biology

A:

The main function of flower petals is to attract pollinators such as butterflies, bees and bats. Flower petals typically have bright and vivid colors which assist in pollination by drawing the attention of insects, birds and animals. Some petals have markings, such as spots and stripes, to help pollinators find the pollen in the flower.

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  • How Do Fungi Reproduce?

    Q: How Do Fungi Reproduce?

    A: Fungi reproduce in one of two ways: asexually through mitosis, or sexually through meiosis. Sexual reproduction occurs far less frequently than asexual production and usually only when necessary to adapt to environmental change.
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  • What Is a Biotic Environment?

    Q: What Is a Biotic Environment?

    A: Biotic environments consist of all living things in an ecosystem. All of the plants, animals, fungi and microbes in an environment are said to be its biotic component. The biotic component is distinguished from the abiotic, or nonliving, component, which is mainly comprised of the mineral, chemical and energetic components of the environment such as water, sunlight and soil.
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  • Why Is Blood Considered to Be a Tissue?

    Q: Why Is Blood Considered to Be a Tissue?

    A: Scientists categorize blood as a connective tissue for two primary reasons. According to Rutgers University, blood originates in embryo in the mesoderm, one of the three primary layers of cells; blood shares this origin with other kinds of connective tissue. And, like other kinds of connective tissue, blood plays a connective role with respect to the systems within the human body.
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  • What Is the Difference Between a Tissue System and an Organ System?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between a Tissue System and an Organ System?

    A: Tissue and organ systems are different hierarchical levels of biological organization. Dr. Ingrid Lobo explains for Nature Education that biological organisms are systems of complexity. The basic functional unit of life is a single cell, and cells similar in function assemble to form tissue. An organ is a collection of different tissues joined as a functional unit; a group of organs working together to perform a specific task is an organ system.
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  • What Causes an Enlarged Thyroid?

    Q: What Causes an Enlarged Thyroid?

    A: An enlarged thyroid gland can be caused by an iodine deficiency, Grave's disease or Hashimoto's disease, according to the Mayo Clinic. Other possible causes include thyroid nodules, pregnancy and thyroid cancer.
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  • What Is a Feedback Mechanism?

    Q: What Is a Feedback Mechanism?

    A: A feedback mechanism is a process that uses the conditions of one component to regulate the function of the other. It is done to either increase or dampen the change in the system. When the process tends to increase the change in the system, the mechanism is known as positive feedback. Negative feedback is when the process seeks to counter the change and maintain equilibrium.
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  • How Do Sponges Reproduce Asexually?

    Q: How Do Sponges Reproduce Asexually?

    A: According to the University of Wisconsin La Crosse, sponges can reproduce asexually through external budding, gemmules (or internal budding) and the regeneration of broken pieces that develop into full-bodied sponges themselves. Sponges can also reproduce sexually.
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  • What Are the Two Main Parts of the Nervous System?

    Q: What Are the Two Main Parts of the Nervous System?

    A: The two main parts of the nervous system are the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. The central nervous system consists of the spinal cord and the brain, which contains 100 billion nerve cells. The peripheral nervous system is broken down into the somatic and autonomic nervous systems.
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  • What Is an Example of Parasitism in Coral Reefs?

    Q: What Is an Example of Parasitism in Coral Reefs?

    A: One example of a parasitic relationship in coral reefs includes crustaceans from the Copepoda or Isopoda orders, which attach to fish in the reefs, sometimes causing harm but at other times simply holding on and feeding on food particles that float by them. Coral reefs feature organisms that coexist in a number of different relationships, including parasitism, but also symbiosis, competition, commensalism and mutualism.
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  • How Does a Great White Shark Protect Itself?

    Q: How Does a Great White Shark Protect Itself?

    A: Great white sharks have many tools with which to protect themselves, such as powerful jaws, unique scales and efficient eyes. The shark has, in fact, evolved to be both a fierce predator and a defensible fortress.
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  • What Is the Difference Between Binary Fission and Mitosis?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Binary Fission and Mitosis?

    A: According to Estrella Mountain Community College, the main difference between mitosis and binary fission are the cells that perform these task. Prokaryotic cells divide by binary fission, while eukaryotic cells divide by mitosis.
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  • What Domain Do Humans Belong To?

    Q: What Domain Do Humans Belong To?

    A: Humans belong to the domain Eukaryota. This domain includes four of the six kingdoms of life: Protista, Fungi, Plantae and Animalia. The other two domains are Archaea and Bacteria.
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  • Why Were Blood Tests Required Before Marriage?

    Q: Why Were Blood Tests Required Before Marriage?

    A: Premarital blood tests have been used to check people getting married for syphilis, rubella, HIV and sickle-cell anemia. The objective of such tests was to ensure the infected person got treated prior to infecting his or her partner or child. In the United States, premarital blood laws were enacted during the 1930s and 1940s when syphilis was considered a potential public health concern.
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  • How Do the Body's Systems Work Together?

    Q: How Do the Body's Systems Work Together?

    A: The human body is comprised of several different systems that must work together to carry out the various processes necessary for good health. According to the University of Washington, the nervous system controls many of these various systems directly. For example, when the body needs to alter the beating rate of the heart or blood pressure, the brain sends the message to do so via nerve impulses.
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  • What Does Catalase Do?

    Q: What Does Catalase Do?

    A: Catalase is an enzyme found in organisms exposed to oxygen. It breaks down hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen, according the Encyclopedia Britannica. It is found in large amounts in the tissues of mammals, and it helps prevent damage to tissues from peroxide, which is a byproduct of many metabolic reactions.
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  • What Are Habitats of Fungi?

    Q: What Are Habitats of Fungi?

    A: Fungi can live in a variety of habitats that are classified as either marine or terrestrial: in the soil, in water, and on plants and animals. Evidence suggests that some fungi have evolved closely with their partnered plant or animal to develop a productive symbiotic relationship. Fungi, which include yeast, mushrooms and mold, are classified separately from plants, animals and bacteria.
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  • What Is Character Displacement?

    Q: What Is Character Displacement?

    A: Character displacement occurs when certain characteristics react to evolutionary factors and stimuli. This displacement allows closely related species to coexist in societies without creating different species, breeds or overgrowing the population of a species.
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  • What Are Some Examples of Saprophytic Bacteria?

    Q: What Are Some Examples of Saprophytic Bacteria?

    A: Examples of saprophytic bacteria include cheese mold, lactic acid, yeast and rotting kitchen waste. Saprophytic bacteria are fungal organisms that feed off of decaying organic matter. The term "saprophyte" refers specifically to fungal and bacterial saprotrophs, but animal saprotrophs are known as saprozoites.
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  • Why Is It Important for Organisms to Maintain Homeostasis?

    Q: Why Is It Important for Organisms to Maintain Homeostasis?

    A: Homeostasis is the process through which an organism maintains certain internal conditions, such as a human body's internal mechanisms maintaining body temperature at a specific level to prevent over or under heating; this process is important because it makes it possible for cells and organs to function properly. For example, certain parts of the human body cease to function if they become too hot or too cold; this is why it is possible for people to freeze to death or die from overheating.
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  • How Do You Grow Chest Hair Faster?

    Q: How Do You Grow Chest Hair Faster?

    A: There is no proven method that speeds up the growth of chest hair. The rate of hair growth in any individual is largely based on genetics.
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  • Where Do Turtles Live?

    Q: Where Do Turtles Live?

    A: Turtles inhabit virtually every terrestrial, aquatic and marine habitat in the world that is warm enough to permit activity. Turtles are residents of every continent except Antarctica and of all the world’s temperate and tropical oceans.
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