Biology

A:

The molecules that make up the backbone of DNA are deoxyribose and a phosphate group, according to the Physiology Department of the University of Illionis at Chicago. Deoxyribose is a five-carbon sugar. The phosphate group contains one phosphorus atom bonded to four oxygen atoms.

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  • A Brief Guide to High Absolute Monocytes

    Q: A Brief Guide to High Absolute Monocytes

    A: Monocytes are a type of white blood cell produced in the bone marrow. Their main function is to fight infection. A high absolute monocyte count occurs as a result of chronic infection.
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  • What Are Disadvantages of Asexual Reproduction?

    Q: What Are Disadvantages of Asexual Reproduction?

    A: The primary disadvantage to asexual reproduction is the lack of genetic diversity among the resulting offspring. In contrast to sexual reproduction, which involves the recombination of two different sets of genes, an asexual organism possesses the same genes as its parent did. This can lead to problems if the parent has a genetic defect; without another parent to replace the gene, the offspring possesses the defect as well.
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  • What Is the Primary Function of the Circulatory System?

    Q: What Is the Primary Function of the Circulatory System?

    A: According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the primary function of the circulatory system is to pass substances back and forth between blood and the body's tissues. The NCBL notes this system is also called the "cardiovascular system."
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  • Why Were Blood Tests Required Before Marriage?

    Q: Why Were Blood Tests Required Before Marriage?

    A: Premarital blood tests have been used to check people getting married for syphilis, rubella, HIV and sickle-cell anemia. The objective of such tests was to ensure the infected person got treated prior to infecting his or her partner or child. In the United States, premarital blood laws were enacted during the 1930s and 1940s when syphilis was considered a potential public health concern.
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  • Why Do Animals Need Water?

    Q: Why Do Animals Need Water?

    A: Animals need water in order for their bodies and brains to function properly because without water they will become dehydrated, malnourished and will ultimately not survive. Most animals actually gain the majority of their water from the food they eat, rather than consuming water by itself.
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  • How Does Algae Form?

    Q: How Does Algae Form?

    A: Algae are a type of plant that usually grows on the surface of still water, such as a small pond, when there is an ecological imbalance. In some cases, algae is able to grow at a rapid rate, potentially spreading across the entire surface.
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  • What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Biotechnology?

    Q: What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Biotechnology?

    A: The advantages of biotechnology include curing infectious diseases, creating more efficient fuels and increasing farming yields to feed more people. Disadvantages of biotechnology include antibiotic resistant bacteria, new allergic reactions and higher prices for farmers.
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  • What Is Structural Adaptation?

    Q: What Is Structural Adaptation?

    A: Structural adaptations are the physical features of an organism that help it to survive and succeed in its environment. Structural adaptations can affect the way the creature moves, eats, reproduces or protects itself.
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  • Why Are Animals Important?

    Q: Why Are Animals Important?

    A: Animals are important for many reasons, including the assistance they give to plant ecosystems, the psychological and emotional support they can offer to humans, and the knowledge gained from the human study of them. Some of the most important animals include primates, bats and bees.
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  • What Is a List of Non-Pathogenic Bacteria?

    Q: What Is a List of Non-Pathogenic Bacteria?

    A: A list of non-pathogenic bacteria is an outline of the types of bacteria that do not cause illnesses in humans. They include staphylococcus, lactobacillus, Escherichia coli, bifidobacteria, bacteroides and Brevibacterium linens. These bacteria have positive roles in the functioning of the body and are therefore harmless.
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  • What Is a Pathogenic Organism?

    Q: What Is a Pathogenic Organism?

    A: A pathogenic organism is a bacterium, fungus, prion or virus that survives by feeding off of a host. A pathogenic organism typically causes disease in the host organism.
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  • What Do Dead Lice Eggs Look Like?

    Q: What Do Dead Lice Eggs Look Like?

    A: Lice eggs, also called nits, look like small sesame seeds, and they are attached firmly to the hair. Dead lice eggs stay afixed to the hair and remain in the hair if they're not removed properly.
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  • How High Can a Human Jump?

    Q: How High Can a Human Jump?

    A: The greatest human leapers in the world are able to jump over a bar suspended nearly 8 feet off of the ground. While the world record consistently increased for a period of about 100 years, recently, it appears that competitive high jumpers may be approaching the human body’s biological limits. Most average humans jump only a fraction of this height.
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  • Why Are Decomposers Important?

    Q: Why Are Decomposers Important?

    A: Decomposers are important because they are crucial for the proper functioning of ecosystems. They recycle the minerals found in dead plants and animals back into the food chain. Ecosystems do not waste energy or materials, and as such, the decomposers capitalize on any remaining energy in a dead organism and make the minerals available to the entire biome.
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  • What Is an Example of Parasitism in Coral Reefs?

    Q: What Is an Example of Parasitism in Coral Reefs?

    A: One example of a parasitic relationship in coral reefs includes crustaceans from the Copepoda or Isopoda orders, which attach to fish in the reefs, sometimes causing harm but at other times simply holding on and feeding on food particles that float by them. Coral reefs feature organisms that coexist in a number of different relationships, including parasitism, but also symbiosis, competition, commensalism and mutualism.
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  • How Do You Grow Chest Hair Faster?

    Q: How Do You Grow Chest Hair Faster?

    A: There is no proven method that speeds up the growth of chest hair. The rate of hair growth in any individual is largely based on genetics.
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  • How Do Multicellular Organisms Grow?

    Q: How Do Multicellular Organisms Grow?

    A: Multicellular organisms may evolve into large and complex beings, but they all begin as a single cell and pass through several defined stages of development. All beings, from small plants and insects to large elephants, giraffes and even humans, begin as single, simple cells, called fertilized eggs.
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  • What Are the Four Ways That Pathogens Are Spread?

    Q: What Are the Four Ways That Pathogens Are Spread?

    A: The Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry states that four ways pathogens are spread are by droplet infection, direct contact, bodily fluids and vectors. Pathogens can also be spread via contaminated food and water.
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  • What Is the Average IQ Level?

    Q: What Is the Average IQ Level?

    A: The average IQ score, by definition, is 100. People who take IQ tests are compared to each other, and the average score is placed at 100.
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  • What Is the Purpose of Mitosis?

    Q: What Is the Purpose of Mitosis?

    A: The purpose of mitosis is cell reproduction, regeneration and growth. Mitosis is cell division that occurs in the nucleus of a cell. The result of mitosis is the formation of two cells, called daughter cells, that are genetically identical to the original cell.
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  • Why Is It Important to Classify Organisms?

    Q: Why Is It Important to Classify Organisms?

    A: There are many reasons that classifying organisms is important, such as helping understand the genetic relationships between different groups and species, helping with wide studies of organisms and helping to develop new biological sciences such as biogeography. Each of the groups and sets are created by studying the differences and similarities found in species and organisms known.
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