Biology

A:

Gregor Mendel is known for his discoveries in the study of heredity. He has been nicknamed "the father of modern genetics."

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  • Does a fungus have a nucleus?

    Q: Does a fungus have a nucleus?

    A: Members of the kingdom Fungi have cells with a nucleus. Fungi cells have a cell wall and membrane-bound organelles. The presence of membrane-bound organelles causes fungi to be classified as eukaryotes.
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  • What is an example of a saprophyte?

    Q: What is an example of a saprophyte?

    A: Some examples of saprophytes are the bacteria which subsist on human waste, the ink cap mushroom and non-photosynthetic plants, such as Indian pipe and gnome plant. Saprophyte is somewhat of an outdated name: fungi once termed saprophytes are now called saprobes, and plants once termed saprophytes are now called mycotrophic.
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  • What infections does penicillin cure?

    Q: What infections does penicillin cure?

    A: Penicillin treats middle ear infections, pneumonia, urinary tract infections, bronchitis and laryngitis, according to MedicineNet. The Free Dictionary claims that penicillin also treats skin infections, respiratory ailments and scarlet fever.
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  • How does a volvox eat?

    Q: How does a volvox eat?

    A: The volvox primarily eats through photosynthesis. Individual cells within the organism contain a red eyespot and, along with chloroplasts, make food from sunlight.
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  • What do you call a scientist who studies plants?

    Q: What do you call a scientist who studies plants?

    A: A scientist who studies plants is called a botanist. Also called plant biologists, botanists study diverse plant life ranging from small microorganisms to giant trees. As experts in the field of botany, botanists are well-versed in the identification and classification of plant life, the biochemical functions and processes of plants and the various plant diseases and cures.
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  • What is biological spectrum?

    Q: What is biological spectrum?

    A: The biological spectrum consists of all living organisms divided into three domains, coexisting across various levels of biological organization. Microbiologist Carl Woese organized all known organisms into a phylogenetic tree of life based on RNA and common ancestor comparisons. The three domains are bacteria, archaea and eukaryota, which are further subdivided into kingdoms. All three domains exist on various levels of biological organization, from a cellular level to its biosphere.
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  • What is the monomer of DNA called?

    Q: What is the monomer of DNA called?

    A: Nucleotides are the monomer of DNA. They are made of a 5-carbon sugar (deoxyribose), a phosphate group, and a nitrogenous base bound to the sugar. The four different types of nucleotides are adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G) and cytosine (C).
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  • What is an example of commensalism?

    Q: What is an example of commensalism?

    A: One example of commensalism is the relationship between Patiria miniata, known as the Bat star, and a segmented worm called Ophiodromus pugettensis. The star has several grooves protruding from its mouth. Some Ophiodromus pugettensis worms live inside these grooves, but they do not harm the starfish.
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  • What is a taxonomic key?

    Q: What is a taxonomic key?

    A: A taxonomic key is a method used to classify and identify objects and organisms. It shows a series of choices about the characteristics of different organisms. A user picks from these choices and ultimately finds the identity of a specimen.
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  • Why is pH important to living organisms?

    Q: Why is pH important to living organisms?

    A: Living organisms depend on a proper balance of hydrogen and hydroxide ions in order to maintain essential physiological processes. Scientists use pH to express the concentration of hydrogen ions in a solution. Many organisms have tightly regulated systems to maintain the pH within the required range.
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  • Why is respiration important for living things?

    Q: Why is respiration important for living things?

    A: Respiration is one of the requirements for living things because it is the process where organisms exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide. This is related yet different from cellular respiration, which is the process where individual cells convert oxygen into carbon dioxide while converting food to energy.
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  • What are the end products of fermentation?

    Q: What are the end products of fermentation?

    A: The end products of fermentation are alcohol, carbon dioxide and lactic acid. The process is essential in the production of beer, fermented milk and bread. To arrive at these end products, sugars are broken down in a process called glycolysis. During the process, huge amounts of hydrogen atoms are produced and deposited on pyruvic acid, the end product of glucose.
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  • What are the harmful effects of microorganisms?

    Q: What are the harmful effects of microorganisms?

    A: While not every microorganism is dangerous, some microorganisms can cause disease and infections in humans and other living things. Microorganisms, also called microbes, also contribute to decomposition and spoilage of food, and they can leave toxic waste products behind even if they are eradicated from the contaminated material.
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  • How are gram-positive cocci in pairs interpreted?

    Q: How are gram-positive cocci in pairs interpreted?

    A: A Gram stain showing gram-positive cocci in pairs, or diplococci, is a morphological characteristic of several bacteria. Gram stains can be positive or negative, depending on the cell wall composition of the bacteria. Morphologies in Gram stains include cocci, rods, coccobacilli and spirochetes
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  • What family do humans belong to?

    Q: What family do humans belong to?

    A: Humans are in the Hominidae family in Linnaean classification. Members of this family are called hominids. Orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos, considered the great apes, are also members of the Hominidae family.
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  • What is cutaneous respiration?

    Q: What is cutaneous respiration?

    A: Cutaneous respiration occurs in insects and organisms that do not have respiratory organs. These organisms diffuse dissolved oxygen across their bodies in order to breathe.
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  • What is a systemic viral infection?

    Q: What is a systemic viral infection?

    A: A systemic viral infection occurs in many different systems or organs of the body, as opposed to a localized viral infection, which affects only one part or organ of the body. Because viruses are able to reproduce at a high rate, viral infections can spread quickly throughout the body.
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  • What is an experimental setup in science?

    Q: What is an experimental setup in science?

    A: In science, the experimental setup is the part of research in which the experimenter analyzes the effect of a specific variable. This setup is quite similar to the control setup; ideally, the only difference involves the variable that the experimenter wants to test in the current project.
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  • What is an example of a parasitic relationship?

    Q: What is an example of a parasitic relationship?

    A: An example of a parasitism relationship is that of ticks, fleas, lice or leeches on a host such as a human or dog. A parasitism relationship is where one of two plants or animals gains at the expense the other without killing it.
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  • Is air a fluid?

    Q: Is air a fluid?

    A: Although fluid is sometimes used as an alternative word for liquid, air is treated as a fluid in the field of fluid mechanics. Objects moving through air encounter forces and experience conditions similar to objects traveling through liquids.
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  • What are examples of protozoa?

    Q: What are examples of protozoa?

    A: Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma gondii, Pneumocystis carinii, Acanthamoeba, Giardia lamblia and Naegleria are all examples of protozoa. They are unicellular eukaryotic organisms that exist in all habitable environments on Earth, and many species of protozoa act as parasites on higher animals.
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