Biology

A:

There is no proven method that speeds up the growth of chest hair. The rate of hair growth in any individual is largely based on genetics.

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  • Why Is Chalk Eating Dangerous?

    Q: Why Is Chalk Eating Dangerous?

    A: While chalk itself is not toxic, there is a potential danger in eating anything that is not actually food due to the fact that it is not processed according to food industry regulations and may contain any number of impurities. About.com warns that it can also be dangerous if done excessively because malnutrition is likely to result.
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  • What Is Biological Inheritance?

    Q: What Is Biological Inheritance?

    A: Biological inheritance is broadly defined as physical heredity. Heredity, or inheritance in the biological sense, refers to the physical features that offspring inherit from their parents, such as eye color, shape of nose and mouth, height and other distinguishing physical characteristics.
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  • How Are Gram-Positive Cocci in Pairs Interpreted?

    Q: How Are Gram-Positive Cocci in Pairs Interpreted?

    A: A Gram stain showing gram-positive cocci in pairs, or diplococci, is a morphological characteristic of several bacteria. Gram stains can be positive or negative, depending on the cell wall composition of the bacteria. Morphologies in Gram stains include cocci, rods, coccobacilli and spirochetes
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  • What Part of the Brain Controls Writing?

    Q: What Part of the Brain Controls Writing?

    A: Generally, the left hemisphere of the brain controls writing, the Mayfield Clinic explains. It also controls speech, comprehension and arithmetic. Moreover, it is dominant in language and hand use in around 92 percent of people.
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  • What Is the Function of a Root Hair Cell?

    Q: What Is the Function of a Root Hair Cell?

    A: A root hair cell in a plant absorbs minerals that have been dissolved in water. They allow a plant to absorb these minerals by increasing the surface area; this is extremely beneficial to plants that live in dry areas.
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  • Where Do Archaebacteria Live?

    Q: Where Do Archaebacteria Live?

    A: Archaebacteria, more properly called archaea, are single celled organisms that live in a wide range of habitats, including the harsh conditions of hot springs. Thermophiles are arachea which grow best at temperatures above 45 Celsius, but some species thrive in much warmer temperatures. According to Reference.com, "Methanopyrus kandleri Strain 116 grows at 122 °C, which is the highest recorded temperature at which any organism will grow."
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  • What Are the Three Types of Symbiotic Relationships?

    Q: What Are the Three Types of Symbiotic Relationships?

    A: Three types of symbiotic relationships are mutualism, commensalism and parasitism. In symbiosis, at least one member of the pair benefits from the relationship, while the host may also benefit, may be unaffected or may be harmed.
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  • What Is the Difference Between Spontaneous Generation and Biogenesis?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Spontaneous Generation and Biogenesis?

    A: Spontaneous generation is the belief that life can be formed from nonliving things, whereas biogenesis is the creation of life from other living things. Several experiments have proved that spontaneous generation is an illogical body of thought.
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  • How Do Plants Get Rid of Waste?

    Q: How Do Plants Get Rid of Waste?

    A: Plants get rid of waste through a process called excretion. Different waste products are excreted in different ways.
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  • What Do Evolutionists Believe?

    Q: What Do Evolutionists Believe?

    A: Evolutionists tend to believe and accept some form of the Darwinian argument that a natural selection process and environmental factors are responsible for all the forms of life on Earth. Life, as it exists today for evolutionists, is a result of a series of random cosmic events that caused chemical processes to create life-forms. All life-forms on Earth are related from the most minuscule to the most complex.
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  • What Is an Example of Mutualism in the Desert?

    Q: What Is an Example of Mutualism in the Desert?

    A: An example of mutualism in the desert is the relationship between the desert mistletoe plant and the Phainopepla bird. As the bird eats the berries produced by the desert mistletoe, it passes undigested seeds. This ensures the survival of the desert mistletoe.
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  • What Are the Eight Levels of Biological Classification?

    Q: What Are the Eight Levels of Biological Classification?

    A: The eight levels of biological classification are domain, kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus and species. These levels are an important part of taxonomy, which is the science of identifying species and organizing them according to systems of classification.
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  • What Is the Definition of Fungi?

    Q: What Is the Definition of Fungi?

    A: The fungi are a kingdom in the eukaryote domain. Fungi are important decomposers in all ecosystems because they can break down a wide variety of organic matter. Lignin, a component of wood, would not get broken down without fungal decomposers, so the nutrients would not be recycled.
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  • What Is the Difference Between Ectoplasm and Endoplasm?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Ectoplasm and Endoplasm?

    A: Endoplasm and ectoplasm are names for the inner and outer portions of an amoeba’s cytoplasm. Ectoplasm is the clear outer cytoplasmic layer of an amoeba. Endoplasm, on the other hand, is the inner granule-rich cytoplasm of the amoeba.
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  • Why Is It Important for Organisms to Maintain Homeostasis?

    Q: Why Is It Important for Organisms to Maintain Homeostasis?

    A: Homeostasis is the process through which an organism maintains certain internal conditions, such as a human body's internal mechanisms maintaining body temperature at a specific level to prevent over or under heating; this process is important because it makes it possible for cells and organs to function properly. For example, certain parts of the human body cease to function if they become too hot or too cold; this is why it is possible for people to freeze to death or die from overheating.
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  • What Is the Meaning of the Circle of Life?

    Q: What Is the Meaning of the Circle of Life?

    A: The circle of life is a symbolic representation of birth, survival and death. The idea of life as a circle or a wheel exists across multiple religions and philosophies. Some wheels or circles are considerably more complex than others.
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  • What Is Metabolic Shock?

    Q: What Is Metabolic Shock?

    A: Metabolic shock is a symptom of metabolic acidosis, which occurs when the body produces an excess of acid, or cannot rid itself of acid build-up. It can lead to rapid breathing, lethargy, confusion and in severe cases, death.
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  • What Is the Glycemic Index?

    Q: What Is the Glycemic Index?

    A: The glycemic index is a method for ranking the impact of a carbohydrate-containing food on blood glucose in comparison to a reference food, such as glucose. A food with a high glycemic index raises blood glucose higher than a food with a low glycemic index.
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  • What Is the Difference Between Organic and Inorganic Matter?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Organic and Inorganic Matter?

    A: The main difference between organic and inorganic matter is organic compounds contain carbon and carbon-hydrogen bonds, while most inorganic compounds do not contain carbon. Organic compounds are produced by and are associated with living organisms. Inorganic compounds are created by non-living natural processes or human intervention.
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  • What Is the Difference Between a Chrysalis and a Cocoon?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between a Chrysalis and a Cocoon?

    A: Chrysalis and cocoon are two physical objects that are made in the same phase of a butterfly or moth's life, however, a chrysalis refers to the casing that a butterfly makes when it transforms, whereas a cocoon is a woven case made by a moth during this stage to protect itself. The materials that a cocoon and a chrysalis are made of are also different.
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  • What Are the Components of an Ecosystem?

    Q: What Are the Components of an Ecosystem?

    A: An ecosystem is comprised of abiotic and biotic organisms. Energy cycles through the abiotic and biotic organisms to maintain balance within the ecosystem. The abiotic parts of an ecosystem include the non-living components, such as air, water and the basic compounds of the environment. Climatic and edaphic factors are several abiotic components of an ecosystem.
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