Q:

What are some facts about the exosphere?

A:

Quick Answer

As the highest layer of the atmosphere, the Earth's exosphere contains very thin air and features both lower and upper boundaries. The exosphere's boundaries vary by altitude depending on the level of the sun's activity and solar radiation emissions. There is some debate among scientists as to whether the exosphere should be considered a layer of the atmosphere or a part of space.

Know More

Full Answer

The exosphere is also known for not having many molecular collisions and for having low molecular densities. The Earth's exosphere contains the following gases: carbon dioxide, hydrogen, oxygen and helium. Below the Earth's exosphere is the thermosphere, followed by the mesosphere, stratosphere and troposphere.

Learn more about Atmosphere

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the importance of the exosphere?

    A:

    The exosphere is the outermost layer of Earth's atmosphere. Although it is thin, it absorbs radiation that the sun gives off, shielding the layers of the atmosphere underneath.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where do the temperature inversions occur in the atmosphere?

    A:

    In meteorology, temperature inversions occur in the layer of the atmosphere closest to the Earth's surface, known as the troposphere. Temperature inversions in the atmosphere occur when a cool layer of air close to the Earth's surface is covered by a warm layer above.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is found in the mesosphere?

    A:

    The mesosphere, which is the third innermost layer of the Earth's atmosphere, is comprised largely of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide. Its chemical composition differs very little from that of the innermost layers of atmosphere, with the approximate composition being 79 percent nitrogen, 20 percent oxygen and 1 percent carbon dioxide and other trace gases. The density of these gases is lower in the mesosphere than in the lower atmosphere.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the thickness of the troposphere?

    A:

    The troposphere, the lowest layer of Earth's atmosphere, varies in thickness from 12 miles (65,000 feet) at the equator to only four miles (23,000 feet) near the poles. This layer's thickness changes by as much as seven miles when air density gradually alters due to warming at the surface during different seasons. These shifts in density are most pronounced around mid-latitudes between the tropics and the poles.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore