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What is the density of cooking oil?

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Quick Answer

The density of cooking oil varies depending on the kind of cooking oil used. For example, while canola oil has a density of 7.62 ounces per U.S. cup, corn, peanut and olive oil all have a density of 7.9 ounces per U.S. cup.

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Full Answer

Density towers are a simple science project that can be used to demonstrate the different densities of substances and particularly cooking oil. To create a density tower, several liquids are carefully poured into a clear container one at a time with the densest liquid at the bottom and the lightest liquid at the top. Because of the different densities, each liquid forms its own layer that doesn't mix with the others. For example, canola oil could be stacked on top of corn syrup which in turn is stacked on top of honey.

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