Q:

What is the coldest ocean?

A:

Quick Answer

The coldest deep water ocean is known as the Antarctic Bottom Water. It consists of the waters of the Southern Ocean that surround Antarctica. Temperatures in this ocean range from 0.8 to 2 degrees Celsius.

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Full Answer

Studies show the amount of the Antarctic Bottom Water has been reducing more dramatically than in previous years. It has been disappearing at a rate of approximately 8 million metric tons per second based on data collected between 1980 and 2011. This could have an effect on the Earth's climate, as deep water oceans affect the ability to move carbon dioxide and heat around the planet.

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