Q:

Where do bananas come from?

A:

Quick Answer

Bananas come from the world's largest herb, commonly referred to as a banana tree. Most species of banana trees thrive in warmer climates, although there a few smaller cold-hardy varieties that can make good house plants.

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Full Answer

Bananas are produced on the tree from a female flower that develops without being pollinated. The banana fruit grow in a cluster sometimes referred to as a "hand." They range in size from 2.5 to 9 inches long and are pink, yellow, green and/or red. Not all bananas are suitable for human consumption. Some taste bad, while others contain seeds too big to consume.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Do bananas grow on trees or bushes?

    A:

    Bananas do not grow on trees or bushes; bananas actually grow on a herb. The banana is the world's largest herb, although it is commonly referred to as a banana tree. The genus name of the banana tree is musa, which is part of the Musaceae family.

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  • Q:

    Does coffee affect plant growth?

    A:

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    How tall is the tallest tree in the world?

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    As of 2014, the tallest tree known in the world is 379 feet tall. Discovered in 2006 by Chris Atkins and Michael Taylor, the tree is a Northern California redwood named Hyperion.

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    What is a list of some flowers in alphabetical order?

    A:

    Given the sheer number of flowering plants in the world, which botanists working for the Kew Royal Botanic Gardens place at between 358,000 and just over 400,000, the list of names available for categorization is enormous. The potential list is made even longer by the habit of giving flowers two names: one common and the other scientific.

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