Q:

What is the average yearly rainfall of the Pacific Ocean?

A:

Quick Answer

The Pacific Ocean receives an average of roughly 50 inches of rain per year. The Pacific Ocean is the largest of Earth's oceans, spanning across nearly half of the world's open water sources, or about 28 percent of the surface of Earth.

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Full Answer

The Pacific Ocean lays across the Southern Ocean and reaches up to the Western hemisphere; its span covers Australia and Asia. The large body of water is known for its earthquake potential and volcanic activity. This zone is called the Pacific Ring of Fire. Additionally, the Pacific Ocean sees regular trends in weather each year as well as consistent trade wind routes.

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