Q:

Do tarantulas hibernate?

A:

Quick Answer

Tarantulas do not hibernate, but they do experience torpor, which is a state of lethargy. Torpor is a short-term body temperature reduction on cool days that allows the spiders to leave their nest to hunt on temperate days. Hormonal changes and daylight drive hibernation, according to BBC Wildlife Magazine.

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Do tarantulas hibernate?
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Full Answer

More than 50 species of tarantulas live in the dry, well-drained, open areas of the deserts in the Southwest and grasslands of the central United States. Tarantulas share a body structure similar to crabs, and they chase down their prey rather than catching it in a web. Poison from two fangs dissolves the prey's insides, which facilitates the sucking method of eating employed by the spiders. Tarantula bites to humans are not fatal, but they are very painful.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Are tarantulas dangerous?

    A:

    Tarantulas are not dangerous to humans. Tarantulas have an unpleasant bite, but their venom is not deadly. The average bee's venom is more potent than that of a tarantula.

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    Do tarantulas spin webs?

    A:

    Tarantulas spin webs, but they don't use them to trap their prey like many other spiders do. Instead, they live in them and use them for mating and molting purposes.

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    How long do tarantulas live?

    A:

    Male tarantula spiders can live upwards of seven years, while females can live up to 30. Their longevity is aided by the fact they molt, or shed, their exoskeletons to enable them to grow and repair their bodies.

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  • Q:

    What eats tarantulas?

    A:

    The tarantula hawk wasp is the biggest natural enemy of the tarantula. Many animals and insects, including larger mammals, reptiles, birds and fly maggots, eat tarantulas as well.

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