Q:

What is the name of a female sheep?

A:

Quick Answer

A female sheep is called a ewe, and a young female is called a ewe lamb. A male sheep is called a ram, and a young male is called a ram lamb.

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Full Answer

Sheep have a thick coat of fleece on their bodies, and they have hooves that are divided into two toes. Not all rams have horns, but when they do, the horns are curved outwards. The average lifespan of a sheep is seven years. The largest sheep is the Argali, which lives in the Altai Mountains of Siberia and Mongolia. Wild sheep can climb mountains. Male sheep can grow up to 4 feet tall depending on the species.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is a female sheep called?

    A:

    A female sheep is called a "ewe," a docile creature of high intelligence. Female sheep weigh between 150 and 200 pounds, and reach sexual maturity around 6 months depending on the breed, the type of nutrition available and the season in which they were born.

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  • Q:

    What is a male sheep called?

    A:

    A male sheep that has reached breeding age is called a ram. A younger male sheep is referred to as a ram lamb while a newborn is simply a lamb.

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  • Q:

    What do sheep eat?

    A:

    A sheep's diet consists mainly of pasture plants, including grass, forbs and clovers. If there is enough pasture available to the sheep, and the climate permits year-round grazing, no additional food may be needed. If there is not enough forage available, a sheep's diet can be supplemented with items like high-quality hay and grain feed.

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  • Q:

    Why don't sheep drink running water?

    A:

    According to the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, sheep do drink from running water. In fact, they prefer moving water to still water. For food, sheep prefer to graze pastures, eating hay, timothy, weeds and other vegetation, Barking Rock Farm indicates.

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