Q:

What do kangaroos eat?

A:

Quick Answer

What a kangaroo eats depends on the type of kangaroo, but generally they eat grasses, fruits, bark and flowers. There are more than 47 species of kangaroos living today.

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Full Answer

Terrestrial kangaroos, or those living on flat land, eat mostly green vegetation like grasses and leaves. The tree kangaroo eats vegetation, as well as small birds and birds eggs when it can find them.

There are three types of terrestrial kangaroos: wallaroos, wallabies and kangaroos. Wallabies are the smallest terrestrial kangaroo and the largest of the three is the kangaroo.

The tree kangaroo spends almost all its time in trees. They have longer tails than terrestrial kangaroos and this allows them to climb among tree branches quickly and easily.

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    A:

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