Q:

What identifiable features do stingray babies have?

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Quick Answer

Baby stingrays are identifiable by their small size and translucent skin, through which their organs are partially visible. The babies look like miniature versions of their adult counterparts with a pale pink underbelly. The male babies have appendages at their pelvis region called claspers, which resemble small legs. Some have compared the look of baby stingrays to floating ravioli.

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Full Answer

Baby stingrays grow to be quite large while gestating and are fully developed when born. Stingrays breed during the winter months. When the male courts the female, he follows her closely and bites at her pectoral fin. He then places two claspers inside her valve.

Baby stingrays develop inside their mother for nine months. The mother holds the developing embryos in her womb without a placenta. The babies feed off the yolks that remain in their egg sacs, as well as milk that the mother stingray has in her uterus. Females give birth to between five and 15 babies that are born live and able to swim and hunt.

Stingrays are closely related to sharks and have bodies that made of cartilage rather than a bony skeleton. Their long tails contain venom that protects them from predators. Stingrays prey on clams, mussels and shrimp, which they crush with their powerful jaws. Their eyes are located at the top of their bodies and are not used to find prey; instead, the stingray uses electro-sensors to detect food.

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