Q:

What is a group of eagles called?

A:

Quick Answer

According to the U.S. Coast Guard, a group of eagles is referred to as a convocation. OneKind indicates that over 60 different species of eagles are spread throughout the world.

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Full Answer

Although eagles are large birds, their structures vary somewhat depending upon their habitats. Forest-dwellers have short wings and long tails that help them maneuver through the trees. Broad wingspans and short tails are characteristic of eagles living in open areas. Most eagles are carnivorous, and both Harpy and Philippine eagles are able to hunt and carry off large prey such as deer and monkeys. The African vulturine fish-eagle is an unusual species that feeds primarily on oil palm fruit.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are some natural enemies of bald eagles?

    A:

    While bald eagles have no natural predators, they are at high risk from human activity such as chemical pollution, habitat destruction and hunting. The mortality rate for juvenile bald eagles is just over 50 percent in their first year of life and falls to around 25 percent after that.

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  • Q:

    Where can kids learn facts on harpy eagles?

    A:

    Kids can find information about harpy eagles at KidsSanDiegoZoo.org, EnchantedLearning.com and BirdsFlight.com, as of 2015. The harpy eagle is one of the largest birds of prey. It is a swift and agile hunter that lives in rain forests ranging from southern Mexico to northern Argentina. Some of its preferred food sources are monkeys and sloths that can weigh up to 17 pounds.

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  • Q:

    Where do bald eagles live?

    A:

    Bald eagles live in North America and Alaska. The range of the bald eagle stretches from the border of Mexico, across the United States, into Canada and Alaska. In fact, bald eagles are very populous in Alaska.

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  • Q:

    How do bald eagles communicate?

    A:

    Bald eagles, or Haliaeetus leucocephalus, communicate with their mates and against rivals though vocal calls such as chatters, wails and peals, as well as with visual displays such as complex flying routines, head movements, wing flaps and crouching. Chatters sound like small "kwit kwit" noises, while a peal is a long, shrieking cry.

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