Zebras

A:

When trying to locate another zebra, zebras make a high-pitched noise that sounds similar to a barking dog. When looking for a mate, zebras bray much like a donkey does. Zebras can also make snorting and whickering noises like a horse.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • How are zebras classified?

    Q: How are zebras classified?

    A: Zebras are members of the horse family, Equidae, and of the genus Equus. Their nearest living relatives are horses and donkeys. More distant relatives in the order Perissodactyla include tapirs and rhinos.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Do zebras migrate?

    Q: Do zebras migrate?

    A: Zebras living in seasonally dry areas migrate annually, but in areas where food is abundant, zebra populations stay in place year round. The annual migration of more than 300,000 zebra and about 1.5 million wildebeest is a big tourist draw in parts of Africa, especially in Tanzania and Kenya.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Is a zebra a horse?

    Q: Is a zebra a horse?

    A: While zebras and horses are not exactly the same, they do share the same genus of Equus. Zebras are also very similar to donkeys, which make up another member of Equus.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Does a zebra run faster than a horse?

    Q: Does a zebra run faster than a horse?

    A: A zebra cannot run faster than a horse. The top speed of a zebra is approximately 40 miles per hour. The top speed of a horse is approximately 54.7 miles per hour, with a world record of 55 miles per hour.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What noise does a zebra make?

    Q: What noise does a zebra make?

    A: Zebras make a variety of noises to communicate including sounds that sound like barking, braying noises and snorting. Zebras are very social and communicate with not only noises, but facial expressions and ear movements.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why do zebras have stripes?

    Q: Why do zebras have stripes?

    A: Zebras have stripes to repel bugs, such as biting flies. A research team from the University of California found that biting flies that normally attack animals like zebras avoid the black and white stripes.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the niche of the African zebra?

    Q: What is the niche of the African zebra?

    A: Zebras in Africa occupy the large, mammalian herbivore niche in the wild. They primarily consume grasses, weeds and sedges, but they will also eat other types of vegetation such as leaves, fruit and tubers. Zebras have a number of predators that hunt them, including lions, leopards, hyenas and wild dogs.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the name for a female zebra?

    Q: What is the name for a female zebra?

    A: A female zebra is called a mare. Zebra herds have a dominant mare who leads the other mares and their foals. African Wildlife Detective states that an alpha mare defends her right to dominance by fighting and aggressive gestures.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a male zebra called?

    Q: What is a male zebra called?

    A: Male zebras are called stallions. Females are called mares, and young zebras are called foals. In zebra herds, stallions alert the herd to predators and serve as guardians.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Are zebras white with black stripes?

    Q: Are zebras white with black stripes?

    A: Zebras are considered black with white stripes, because their pattern is determined by pigment inhibitors that stop the black pigment that is natural to their skin from producing black fur in some areas. Also, zebras have dark skin underneath their fur.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What two animals make a zebra?

    Q: What two animals make a zebra?

    A: There are no two animals that make up a zebra. It is its own species. They resemble the horse and donkey, but are in a class of their own.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Where does a zebra live?

    Q: Where does a zebra live?

    A: Zebras live in Africa. Plains zebras are found in eastern and southern Africa. Mountain zebras reside in Angola, Namibia, and South Africa. The Grevy's zebra lives in Ethiopia and northern Kenya.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How many types of zebras are there?

    Q: How many types of zebras are there?

    A: Three distinct species of zebras exist. They include the Plains Zebra, Mountain Zebra and Desert Zebra. The Mountain Zebra has two subspecies.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are some zebra facts for kids?

    Q: What are some zebra facts for kids?

    A: One interesting fact about zebras is that different species have different size stripes that range from narrow to wide. Zebras that live farther south on the African planes have stripes that are further apart those of zebras that range in the north. Zebras are closely related to both horses and donkeys, have great eyesight and hearing, and are capable of running up to 35 miles per hour.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How much does a zebra eat a day?

    Q: How much does a zebra eat a day?

    A: According to Encyclopædia Britannica, a zebra spends a significant portion of its day eating limitless amounts of grass in order to accommodate its digestive system, which is less efficient than that of ruminants. Grazing exposes the zebra to predation, but it can survive eating low-quality grasses during times of drought.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the gestation period of a zebra?

    Q: What is the gestation period of a zebra?

    A: The gestation period of a zebra varies based on the species of the animal in question, but most zebras give birth after at least 360 days. In some species, such as the Grevy's zebra, gestation lasts as long as 438 days.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How are zebras born?

    Q: How are zebras born?

    A: Once a zebra mare begins labor, zebra foals are born swiftly from either a standing or prone position. Because zebras are under constant threat of predators in the wild, zebra foals are born fully developed and are able to stand within a few minutes and walk within 15 minutes. Within an hour, a zebra foal is capable of running.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are some unusual facts about zebras?

    Q: What are some unusual facts about zebras?

    A: No zebra has the same set of stripes, according to Find Fast, Facts About Zebras. The Jungle Store explains that there are three species of zebra; and, they include the mountain zebra, plains zebra and Grevy's zebra. Find Fast states that the word zebra comes from the word zevra, which is an Old Portuguese word that means "wild ass." Zebras have very sharp senses, and they sleep while standing up.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How do zebras behave?

    Q: How do zebras behave?

    A: Zebras, best known for their black and white stripes, are herbivorous social animals that like to travel in groups. Zebras engage in mutual grooming behavior and travel at a pace that accommodates the elderly, infirm and young.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How long do zebras live?

    Q: How long do zebras live?

    A: A zebra in the wild lives for about 25 to 30 years, while a zebra at a zoo can live for up to 40 years. Wild zebras must contend with predators such as humans, lions and hyenas. They also do not get services such as medical treatment that zoos provide.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What does a zebra sound like?

    Q: What does a zebra sound like?

    A: When trying to locate another zebra, zebras make a high-pitched noise that sounds similar to a barking dog. When looking for a mate, zebras bray much like a donkey does. Zebras can also make snorting and whickering noises like a horse.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: