Worms

A:

An earthworm's food is consumed, stored and broken down inside its digestive tube, which starts at the mouth and ends at the anus. Along the way, ingested soil is ground down to finer particles, allowing blood vessels in the intestine to absorb nutrient-rich organic matter.

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  • What can you use to kill grub worms?

    Q: What can you use to kill grub worms?

    A: Grub worms can be killed by both natural methods and by purchasing grub worm treatments. Natural methods include applying milky spores or neem oil to the affected area or adding nematodes to the soil. Purchased treatments include Dylox, Merit and Mach-2.
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  • What is the habitat of an earthworm?

    Q: What is the habitat of an earthworm?

    A: The common earthworm lives within soil, but it often emerges from the ground at night and after periods of heavy rain. Earthworms are found abundantly all across North America, Europe and western Asia.
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  • What are some interesting facts about mealworms?

    Q: What are some interesting facts about mealworms?

    A: Mealworms are the larvae of darkling beetles. They are often raised as food for pet lizards, fish and birds or used by fishermen as bait. Adult darkling beetles lay their eggs in soil, and the eggs hatch after a period of time ranging from a few days to one month. Mealworms begin to eat as soon as they hatch.
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  • What are examples of arthropods?

    Q: What are examples of arthropods?

    A: Arthropods, such as insects, shrimps, spiders, centipedes, crayfish, scorpions and millipedes, are the most diverse group of animals in the world. They can be seen on land, in the air and in the sea and are classified under the phylum Arthropoda. Many arthropods remain undiscovered, and the number of species in the largest arthropod class, insects, is assumed to be in the tens of millions.
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  • What is a grub worm?

    Q: What is a grub worm?

    A: Grub worms, also called lawn grubs, are white worm-like pests that live in the soil. They are the larval form of the adult Japanese beetle, sometimes called the June beetle. Each larva is about ½ inch long with a small brown head.
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  • How do flatworms obtain food?

    Q: How do flatworms obtain food?

    A: A flatworm obtains its food through cells on the surface of its body and also through the orifice at the top of the head. The cells absorb nutrients from the water by diffusion, and when digestion is complete, the mouth orifice also serves as the anus.
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  • Of what economic importance are earthworms?

    Q: Of what economic importance are earthworms?

    A: Earthworms play a vital role in breaking down organic particles in soil and aerating soil, and their waste, called castings, is used by gardeners as fertilizer. They also play a role as bait in fly fishing.
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  • How many hearts does an earthworm have?

    Q: How many hearts does an earthworm have?

    A: An earthworm has five aortic arches, each functioning similarly to a heart. The aortic arches have the purpose of pumping blood through the dorsal and ventral blood vessels. The dorsal blood vessel carries blood to the front of the body, while the ventral vessel carries blood to the back.
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  • What do silkworms eat?

    Q: What do silkworms eat?

    A: Silkworms eat mulberry leaves exclusively in nature. Silkworm farms and manufacturers that keep the worms have the option to feed their worms a special artificial mulberry diet.
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  • What is the life cycle of a tapeworm?

    Q: What is the life cycle of a tapeworm?

    A: The life cycle of a tapeworm starts as an egg, which is consumed and stored by an invertebrate. The invertebrate is then consumed by a vertebrate host in which the tapeworm develops and breeds. Some exceptions to this general pattern exist, such as when eggs are retained and hatch within the vertebrate host. Otherwise, fertilized eggs or body segments loaded with fertilized eggs are excreted for invertebrates to consume.
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  • What is a flatworm?

    Q: What is a flatworm?

    A: A flatworm is any member of the phylum Platyhelminthes, which is a group of flattened invertebrates that have soft bodies. There are different species of flatworm, but 80 percent of them are parasitic. This means that most flatworms live in another organism to obtain nourishment from it.
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  • How do silkworms make silk?

    Q: How do silkworms make silk?

    A: Silkworms make silk by spewing a substance called fibroin through small holes in their jaws called spinnerets. The spewed-out substance consists of digested leaves and protein produced by the worm. The silkworm produces up to 1200 silken threads within a 72 hour time period, creating a soft, silver cocoon. Once the cocoon process is complete, silk farmers harvest the threads with steam, and the delicate fibers are spun and woven into silk fabrics.
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  • How do tapeworms move?

    Q: How do tapeworms move?

    A: Tapeworms do not move much on their own, as their main purpose is to stay attached to the digestive tract of their host animals. They are, however, composed of hundreds or thousands of segments called proglottids. Each proglottid has functional muscles and is fully capable of movement.
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  • How do earthworms digest food?

    Q: How do earthworms digest food?

    A: An earthworm's food is consumed, stored and broken down inside its digestive tube, which starts at the mouth and ends at the anus. Along the way, ingested soil is ground down to finer particles, allowing blood vessels in the intestine to absorb nutrient-rich organic matter.
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  • How do flatworms move?

    Q: How do flatworms move?

    A: Flatworms move in various ways. Some use muscular movements of their bodies, whereas others have soles underneath for locomotion. Some spit mucus and use it as a rope to pull themselves. Some aquatic species use their cilia, or small moving hairs, to swim. Some burrow, anchoring with their rear ends and moving their heads. Parasites within hosts use suckers, hooks or spines.
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  • Do earthworms eat soil?

    Q: Do earthworms eat soil?

    A: Earthworms eat organic matter like plant material, microorganisms and dead animals that are found in soil, but they don’t actually eat the soil. However, their droppings, called castings, become a part of the soil, which benefits living plants, according to HowStuffWorks.
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  • Q: What is the life cycle of mealworms?

    A: There are four stages of in the life cycle of a mealworm: egg, larval, pupa and adult. A mealworm is not the adult version of the bug; a mealworm is the larval stage of an insect that eventually grows into a beetle in the adult phase. The life cycle of mealworm lasts approximately one year.
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  • Q: What is the difference between a leech and a blood sucker?

    A: The main difference between a leech and other critters considered bloodsuckers is species. Leeches are unique because they are worms that live in wet, watery areas. Leeches are creepy, yet fascinating, because they release a toxin into their prey that acts as a numbing agent, allowing them to feed without being discovered. It's hard to escape leeches because they have two suckers on each end of their bodies.
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  • Q: How are flatworms, roundworms and segmented worms alike?

    A: Flatworms, roundworms and segmented worms are actually examples of three very different species of worm, with the only major similarity between all three being that they are all classified as worms. Some species do share similar traits, however; roundworms and flatworms both have a body cavity for example as well as a complete digestive system.
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  • Q: How do flatworms feed?

    A: Flatworms feed by extending their mouth parts and sucking the juices from either prey organisms or, when available, animal corpses, as stated by the Northern Virginia Ecological Study database. Flatworms feed on nematodes, rotifers, aquatic worms, soft-bodied animals of all kinds and sometimes members of their own species when other food sources are not available.
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  • Q: How do you make your own worm farm?

    A: To build a worm farm, gather two plastic bins, a flower pot, a drill, shredded newspaper and some household food waste. Layer the bins one inside the other, using the flower pot as a divider, and layer the shredded newspaper inside the top bin.
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