Squid

A:

Squids and octopuses are both head-footed cephalopods, but their behavior, habitat and physical characteristics are different. Both are blue-blooded aquatic animals, as their blood contains copper and has oxygen-carrying molecules, and they both move by jet propulsion and live in salty waters in temperate zones. They both squirt ink, but it's different colors. Squids produce blue-black ink while octopuses squirt black ink.

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  • How many legs does a squid have?

    Q: How many legs does a squid have?

    A: Squid usually have two tentacles and eight arms that are also called legs. A giant squid's tentacles can be up to 10 meters long and the arms up to 3 meters long. The smallest squid is only 2.5 centimeters in length total.
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  • What is a group of squid called?

    Q: What is a group of squid called?

    A: A group of squid is called a shoal or squad; a group of giant squid is a school. Groups of squid are more easily viewed at sunrise and during twilight, according to New Hampshire Public Television.
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  • How do squid breathe?

    Q: How do squid breathe?

    A: Squid breathe by drawing water through their siphons into their mantles, the large muscular coverings over their bodies, where it passes over their two sets of gill filaments, absorbing oxygen and releasing carbon dioxide via diffusion. The blood that absorbs the oxygen uses a copper compound, haemocyanin, rather than the iron-containing hemoglobin of mammals. The blood is pumped to the gills from two branchial hearts and elsewhere by a third.
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  • Is a squid a fish?

    Q: Is a squid a fish?

    A: Scientifically speaking, a squid is not a fish, but a mollusk. Mollusks are soft-bodied creatures that have gills in order to breath through.
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  • Is a squid a baby octopus?

    Q: Is a squid a baby octopus?

    A: The squid and the octopus are different animals, although they both belong to the molluscan class Cephalopoda and, as such, are related. One major difference between the squid and the octopus is the number of arms. Squid have 10 arms compared to the eight of the octopus.
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  • What do small squid eat?

    Q: What do small squid eat?

    A: Very small squid eat plankton. As they grow larger, they hunt and eat other marine creatures. Common food sources for small squid include small fish, crabs and shrimp.
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  • What is a devil squid?

    Q: What is a devil squid?

    A: The term "devil squid" is usually used in reference to the Humboldt squid, which has a reputation of being highly aggressive. They have attacked divers and been observed engaging in cannibalism.
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  • What are the key similarities and differences between a squid and an octopus?

    Q: What are the key similarities and differences between a squid and an octopus?

    A: Squids and octopuses are both head-footed cephalopods, but their behavior, habitat and physical characteristics are different. Both are blue-blooded aquatic animals, as their blood contains copper and has oxygen-carrying molecules, and they both move by jet propulsion and live in salty waters in temperate zones. They both squirt ink, but it's different colors. Squids produce blue-black ink while octopuses squirt black ink.
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  • What is a baby squid called?

    Q: What is a baby squid called?

    A: Like all cephalopods, squid start their lives as paralarvae. Unlike true larvae, paralarvae "are not morphologically distinct from adults," according to The Coral Digest. They are, instead, miniature versions of the mature species, though they "may occupy different ecological niches."
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  • How long do squids live?

    Q: How long do squids live?

    A: Squids, which are carnivorous cephalopod mollusks of the order Teuthoidea, usually live for only two to three years. Squids are highly developed marine invertebrates with eyes that resemble human eyes.
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  • Q: How many arms does a squid have?

    A: Most types of squid have eight arms, typically arranged in pairs, in addition to two longer feeding tentacles. The squid is a member of the cephalopod group of mollusks that also includes octopodes, and within this group exist more than 280 different types of squid, according to National Geographic.
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  • Q: Do squids have beaks?

    A: Squids do have beaks, and these structures mark the initial part of the digestive system. The beaks are composed of chitin and muscular tissue and resemble a parrot's beak in structure. The beak's function is to capture and break down prey into smaller particles.
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  • Q: How many legs do squid have?

    A: Squid do not have any legs at all, but they do have eight arms and two tentacles, making for a total limb count of 10. All cephalopods have at least eight limbs, but only squid and cuttlefish have true tentacles.
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  • Q: Where do giant squids live?

    A: Giant squid live in every ocean on Earth but are particularly concentrated over the slopes leading up to continents and islands. They are rare in tropical and high polar regions. Giant squid live only in deep, cold water because their blood is incapable of carrying oxygen effectively at higher temperatures.
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  • What do squids eat?

    Q: What do squids eat?

    A: Squids are carnivorous predators that primarily prey on fish, crustaceans and other squid. Because squid vary greatly in size – some species are less than 1 inch in length, while others exceed 30 feet in length – their specific prey preferences differ markedly from one species to the next. Some squid hunt by chasing down their prey, while others hide and lie in wait for food to swim past them.
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  • Q: What eats squid?

    A: The squid's natural predators include birds, fish, sharks and whales. Squid predators vary depending on their habitat. Squid that live near the surface of the water or in warm waters have an increased risk of being eaten, whereas squid that live in icy waters have fewer predators and mainly only have to be wary of sharks and whales. Most capable sea creatures feed on squid.
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  • Q: How do squid reproduce?

    A: Squid engage in internal fertilization, but rather than using a penis for the transference of sperm cells, the males place a packet of sperm cells, called a spermatophore, into the female’s mantle, or body cavity; however, individual squid species exhibit variations on this general model. Shortly after this sperm transfer takes place, the female excretes fertilized eggs into the water.
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  • Q: How big is a giant squid?

    A: As of 2014, the largest recorded giant squid is 43 feet long, including its tentacles. Most giant squid do not exceed 16 feet in length, including the fin and arms. The largest recorded mantle, or body, on a giant squid is 7.4 feet.
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  • What do squid eat?

    Q: What do squid eat?

    A: All squid are carnivores and eat mainly fish, shrimp, crabs and even other squid. They are ambush predators, often relying on stealth to sneak up on prey and capture it before it can escape.
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  • Q: How many gills does a squid have?

    A: Squid have two gills, one on the left and on the right side of their heads. The gills are part of a squid's respiratory and cardiovascular system. They are feather-like organs used to collect oxygen from water passing through them.
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  • Q: How do squids get oxygen from the water?

    A: Squid extract oxygen from the water using gills, just as fish do. These gills are located in the squid's mantle, the soft but muscular cavity behind the squid's head.
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