Snakes

A:

The diet of a baby rattlesnake includes small lizards and small rodents and is similar to that of an adult rattlesnake, only differing in the size of the prey. Like adult rattlesnakes, juveniles only eat live prey.

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  • What Is the Behavior of a King Cobra?

    Q: What Is the Behavior of a King Cobra?

    A: The king cobra is active during the day and is not particularly aggressive, with their first response to threats being to flee, unless the animal in question is a nesting female, in which case they attack very readily. They are specialists in hunting other cold-blooded animals, particularly other snakes. Most of the snakes they hunt are not venomous and include rat snakes and pythons under 10 feet in length.
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  • How Does a Snake Move?

    Q: How Does a Snake Move?

    A: Snakes most commonly move by lateral undulation. Bending their bodies from side to side in waves of motion that pass from head to tail, they push off objects and surface irregularities to propel themselves forward. Snakes can also swim using lateral undulation.
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  • What Is a Group of Snakes Called?

    Q: What Is a Group of Snakes Called?

    A: A group of snakes can be referred to as a den, bed, pit, or nest. The exception to this is a group of rattlesnakes, which is called a rhumba.
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  • How Long Do Snakes Live?

    Q: How Long Do Snakes Live?

    A: The average life span of a snake is 10 to 25 years in the wild. Snakes in captivity can live longer. The life span of a snake depends on the species and the size of the snake. Large snakes such as the King Cobra and the python can live 30 to 40 years.
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  • Where Did the Black Mamba Snake Get Its Name?

    Q: Where Did the Black Mamba Snake Get Its Name?

    A: Though the black mamba snake is actually olive brown in color, it gets its name from the blue-black on the inside of its mouth. The black mamba is widely considered the deadliest snake in the world.
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  • How Big Can a Ball Python Get?

    Q: How Big Can a Ball Python Get?

    A: Ball pythons have a maximum length of 6 feet. Females tend to be larger than males. These small pythons have gentle dispositions and are popular as pets.
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  • Do Snakes Have Bones?

    Q: Do Snakes Have Bones?

    A: Snakes do have bones. Snakes are part of the vertebrate family like most land animals. Snakes have many more bones than humans, and the unique design of their skeleton gives them their shape and flexibility.
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  • What Are Poisonous Snakes in Missouri?

    Q: What Are Poisonous Snakes in Missouri?

    A: Missouri is home to five venomous snake species: timber rattlesnakes, massasauga rattlesnakes, pygmy rattlesnakes, copperheads and cottonmouths. It is important to note that these snakes are correctly called venomous, rather than poisonous. By definition, venom must be injected by fangs or stingers, while poisons are dangerous if they are eaten or absorbed.
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  • What Do Anacondas Look Like?

    Q: What Do Anacondas Look Like?

    A: The most common of the four species, green anacondas are large green snakes bearing asymmetrical black spots over their entire bodies, with the spots on the side having a yellow center. Reaching up to 29 feet and 550 pounds, the green anaconda is the largest snake in the world.
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  • What Is the Difference Between a Cobra Vs. a Rattlesnake?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between a Cobra Vs. a Rattlesnake?

    A: The differences between a cobra and a rattlesnake include the type of venom they have and the fangs with which they inject it, their appearance, their distinctive characteristics and their deadliness to humans. Additionally, cobras and rattlesnakes live in different parts of the world.
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  • How Many Species of Cobras Are There?

    Q: How Many Species of Cobras Are There?

    A: The number of species that can formally be identified as cobras is somewhat open to interpretation. According to Live Science, only 28 species of snake belong to the genus Naja, the genus that scientists claim to be the genetically "true" cobra. However, when one adds all the other species that share traits and genetic kinship with the Naja, the number of cobra or related species reaches 270.
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  • How Long Does It Take for Snake Eggs to Hatch?

    Q: How Long Does It Take for Snake Eggs to Hatch?

    A: Snakes come in a variety of types, and the time that it takes each type of snake's eggs to hatch varies. The king cobra of the Southeast Asian rain forest lays between 18 and 50 eggs which all take between 70 and 77 days to hatch.
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  • How Do You Identify the Green Anaconda?

    Q: How Do You Identify the Green Anaconda?

    A: Although the green anaconda is native to the tropics of South America, it's also found in the wild in Florida. This is probably due to the escape or release of pet anacondas, the United States Geological Survey states. You can identify the green anaconda by its location, color, markings and size.
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  • What Is a Colombian Red-Tail Boa?

    Q: What Is a Colombian Red-Tail Boa?

    A: A red-tail boa is a large South American boa constrictor with a 30-year life span. Its name comes from the reddish pattern on its tail. Typically, an adult red-tail boa is 8 to 10 feet long and weighs about 50 pounds.
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  • What Are Some of the Predators of Snakes?

    Q: What Are Some of the Predators of Snakes?

    A: Predators of snakes include large animals such as foxes, raccoons, boars and birds. In addition to its natural predators in the wild, the snake is threatened by humans. Humans hunt snakes for their venom to make serums. They also use snake skins for clothing and accessories.
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  • What Are Baby Snakes Called?

    Q: What Are Baby Snakes Called?

    A: Baby snakes are commonly referred to as snakelets. Newly born snakes are called neolates, while newly hatched snakes are called hatchlings. A group of snakes is called a nest.
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  • Are Snakes Cold Blooded?

    Q: Are Snakes Cold Blooded?

    A: Snakes are cold-blooded. They become cold if the temperature gets cold. Since snakes cannot maintain their own body temperature, they move to warmer climates to stay warm.
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  • What Is a Green Mamba Snake?

    Q: What Is a Green Mamba Snake?

    A: The green mamba snake is a venomous species of the Elapidae family native to the forests of southeastern Africa. The smallest of the four mamba species, adult green mamba snakes reach an average of 6 to 7 feet in length.
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  • What Does a Black Mamba Eat?

    Q: What Does a Black Mamba Eat?

    A: Black mambas eat small mammals found in their African range, including rodents such as squirrels and others such as hyraxes, along with occasional birds. They kill their prey with venom, striking twice and injecting a neurotoxin, and they do not eat until their prey is paralyzed or dead.
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  • How Long Is an Anaconda?

    Q: How Long Is an Anaconda?

    A: The green anaconda is considered to be one of the largest species of snakes in the world, with some specimens reaching 29 feet in length and weighing as much as 550 pounds. Although reticulated pythons can grow longer, experts contend that the green anaconda is significantly heavier.
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  • Are Pythons Poisonous?

    Q: Are Pythons Poisonous?

    A: The San Diego Zoo explains that none of the large snakes, including pythons, boas and anacondas, are venomous. Instead, these snakes kill their prey by suffocating it within its muscular coils. This process of asphyxiating their prey is called constriction.
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