Snakes

A:

Black mambas eat small mammals found in their African range, including rodents such as squirrels and others such as hyraxes, along with occasional birds. They kill their prey with venom, striking twice and injecting a neurotoxin, and they do not eat until their prey is paralyzed or dead.

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  • What is the behavior of a king cobra?

    Q: What is the behavior of a king cobra?

    A: The king cobra is active during the day and is not particularly aggressive, with their first response to threats being to flee, unless the animal in question is a nesting female, in which case they attack very readily. They are specialists in hunting other cold-blooded animals, particularly other snakes. Most of the snakes they hunt are not venomous and include rat snakes and pythons under 10 feet in length.
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  • What are baby snakes called?

    Q: What are baby snakes called?

    A: Baby snakes are commonly referred to as snakelets. Newly born snakes are called neolates, while newly hatched snakes are called hatchlings. A group of snakes is called a nest.
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  • How many snakes are there in the world?

    Q: How many snakes are there in the world?

    A: With more than 3,400 different species of snakes throughout the world, it is impossible to know exactly how many snakes there are in the world. Of that, about 600 of them are venomous.
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  • How does a snake move?

    Q: How does a snake move?

    A: Snakes most commonly move by lateral undulation. Bending their bodies from side to side in waves of motion that pass from head to tail, they push off objects and surface irregularities to propel themselves forward. Snakes can also swim using lateral undulation.
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  • How are snakes and owls alike in their eating habits?

    Q: How are snakes and owls alike in their eating habits?

    A: Both snakes and owls are carnivorous, eating only meat and no vegetation. They also prey on many of the same types of animals. Both snakes and owls usually swallow their food whole and expel whatever parts they cannot digest.
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  • How often do snakes shed?

    Q: How often do snakes shed?

    A: Adult snakes shed between four and eight times per year. However, their activity level, habitat temperature and feeding frequency and amount affect the frequency of shedding. Additionally, young snakes that are rapidly growing may shed more often.
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  • Are pythons poisonous?

    Q: Are pythons poisonous?

    A: The San Diego Zoo explains that none of the large snakes, including pythons, boas and anacondas, are venomous. Instead, these snakes kill their prey by suffocating it within its muscular coils. This process of asphyxiating their prey is called constriction.
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  • What is the scientific name for a snake?

    Q: What is the scientific name for a snake?

    A: The scientific name given to a particular snake is a combination of its genus name followed by its species name, such as the scientific name of the Asp viper, which is Vipera aspis, or the Sonoran Desert sidewinder, which is Crotalus cerastes cercobombus. A king cobra bears the scientific name Ophiophagus hannah, while the desert adder is the Vipera lebetina.
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  • How are snakes born?

    Q: How are snakes born?

    A: Most snakes hatch from eggs outside of the mother. While a small number of snake species give birth to live snakes rather than laying eggs, all snake eggs are internally fertilized when snakes mate. After mating, some snakes lay their eggs immediately, while others carry the eggs around, laying them only when it is time for the eggs to hatch.
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  • What does a snake hole look like?

    Q: What does a snake hole look like?

    A: To identify a snake hole, look for openings in the ground that are newly visible. Snakes don't construct a dwelling, they inhabit an abandoned rodent's burrow or a naturally-occurring hole. When the snake enters a rodent's former dwelling, it removes the obstructions that previously hid the entrance for security.
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  • Can rattlesnakes swim?

    Q: Can rattlesnakes swim?

    A: Rattlesnakes can swim well but have a very limited strike range when in water. They live in swamps as well as forests, deserts, grasslands, scrub brush and deserts.
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  • What is a Florida banded water snake?

    Q: What is a Florida banded water snake?

    A: The Florida banded water snake is a non-venomous snake found in freshwater lakes, ponds, rivers, streams and marshes throughout Florida's Panhandle and northeast to South Carolina and west to southwestern Alabama. It has black, red or brown bands around its body which can be gray, tan, yellow or reddish.
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  • What is a black snake with yellow diamonds?

    Q: What is a black snake with yellow diamonds?

    A: A black snake with yellow diamonds is a diamond python, or morelia spilota spilota. It is a non-venomous snake found in Indonesia, Australia and New Guinea.
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  • How do snakes digest their food?

    Q: How do snakes digest their food?

    A: When digesting sometimes large food items, snakes benefit from a digestive system that can transition from dormant to fully operational very quickly. According to the BBC, when a snake eats a large prey item, its stomach and intestines expand rapidly, its metabolic rate goes up, and it increases the amount of digestive enzymes that are produced.
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  • What do anacondas look like?

    Q: What do anacondas look like?

    A: The most common of the four species, green anacondas are large green snakes bearing asymmetrical black spots over their entire bodies, with the spots on the side having a yellow center. Reaching up to 29 feet and 550 pounds, the green anaconda is the largest snake in the world.
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  • What do baby rattlesnakes eat?

    Q: What do baby rattlesnakes eat?

    A: The diet of a baby rattlesnake includes small lizards and small rodents and is similar to that of an adult rattlesnake, only differing in the size of the prey. Like adult rattlesnakes, juveniles only eat live prey.
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  • What is an asp snake?

    Q: What is an asp snake?

    A: Asp is an Anglicized term derived from "aspis" used to designate various types of venomous snakes. It usually refers to the Egyptian cobra and the horned viper. The asp is famous due to Shakespeare's portrayal of its role in Cleopatra's suicide in "Antony and Cleopatra."
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  • Why are some snakes born albino?

    Q: Why are some snakes born albino?

    A: Some snakes are born albino because they are subject to a genetic anomaly. This anomaly causes a lack of production in melanin, which is required for normal skin pigmentation.
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  • What is the life cycle of a snake?

    Q: What is the life cycle of a snake?

    A: Seventy percent of snakes begin their lives growing inside of eggs, while the other 30 percent are born live. Some mothers leave, while others stay with their eggs until they hatch. This process is called brooding.
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  • Which types of plants repel snakes?

    Q: Which types of plants repel snakes?

    A: Wormwood, tulbaghia violacea, West Indian lemongrass, Sarpagandha and andrographis paniculata can help repel snakes. Garlic, cinnamon oil, and clove oil can also be used.
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  • How many species of cobras are there?

    Q: How many species of cobras are there?

    A: The number of species that can formally be identified as cobras is somewhat open to interpretation. According to Live Science, only 28 species of snake belong to the genus Naja, the genus that scientists claim to be the genetically "true" cobra. However, when one adds all the other species that share traits and genetic kinship with the Naja, the number of cobra or related species reaches 270.
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