Marine Mammals

A:

According to the Institute for Marine Mammal studies, dolphins can generally hold their breath for as long as 10 minutes. They normally breathe about four to five times per minute.

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  • What sound does a seal make?

    Q: What sound does a seal make?

    A: A seal makes a sound that is a mixture of a bark and an eerie whaling sound, depending on the species of seal. Sea lions are known to bark whenever they come out of the water as they snort to clear their nostrils.
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  • Why is the blue whale endangered?

    Q: Why is the blue whale endangered?

    A: The blue whale is endangered because it was hunted almost to extinction in the late 19th and early 20th century. Though the International Whaling Commission banned the hunting of blue whales in 1966, some countries continued to illegally hunt them until the 1970s.
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  • Did whales have legs?

    Q: Did whales have legs?

    A: Ancestors of modern-day whales, such as Pakicetus, were amphibious cetaceans and possessed legs. Ambulocetus, a descendant of Pakicetus, had shorter legs more suited for aquatic life in addition to paddle-shaped feet.
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  • Where do walruses live?

    Q: Where do walruses live?

    A: According to Marine Life at About.com, walruses are primarily located in sub-Arctic and Arctic waters in the Northern Hemisphere. The Atlantic walrus subspecies lives mainly in the water, on rocky coasts, and on ice near Greenland and northeast Canada. The Pacific subspecies calls United States and Russian waters its home. Walruses' depend heavily on sea ice, which they use for giving birth, nursing, shelter, moulting and travel.
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  • Do whales mate for life?

    Q: Do whales mate for life?

    A: Whales don't mate for life. Some species of whale mate with many different partners in a single year. This most often happens during mating season when many whales gather together to mate and bear offspring.
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  • What eats whales?

    Q: What eats whales?

    A: Killer whales, sharks and false killer whales eat whales. False killer whales and killer whales may hunt whales in packs. Humans are largely considered to be the primary predator of whales.
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  • What does a hippopotamus look like?

    Q: What does a hippopotamus look like?

    A: Hippopotamuses are large land animals characterized by their nearly hairless skin, wide snouts, and brown or grayish-purple skin. Hippopotamuses are the third-largest land mammals on Earth, weighing an average of 7,900 pounds and reaching approximate lengths of 15 feet.
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  • What is the killer whale's scientific name?

    Q: What is the killer whale's scientific name?

    A: The scientific name of the killer whale is Orcinus orca. Instantly recognized by its black and white color, adult orcas commonly reach sizes of 32 feet and 6 tons or greater.
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  • What are dugongs?

    Q: What are dugongs?

    A: Dugongs are also known as seacows. They are large mammals with front flippers and tails, which they use as propellers. They live in the seas around Australia.
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  • What is the elephant seal mating ritual?

    Q: What is the elephant seal mating ritual?

    A: The first step in the elephant seal mating ritual involves battles for supremacy between males. Afterwards, the dominant males drive away the weaker ones and establish harems of 30 to 100 females. The bulls then copulate with the cows in their harems. Only a few of the most powerful bulls have an opportunity to mate.
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  • How long to baby otters stay with their mothers?

    Q: How long to baby otters stay with their mothers?

    A: Different otter species spend different amounts of time living with their mothers after birth. River otters stay with their mothers for about a year, usually long enough for her to become pregnant and deliver a new litter, while sea otter pups can remain dependent on their mothers for a period of five months to a year.
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  • How big is a basking shark's mouth?

    Q: How big is a basking shark's mouth?

    A: The large mouth of the basking shark can measure over 3 feet across when open. The species swims with its mouth agape, catching plankton and other small organisms on bristles along massive gill slits, which filter as much as 1,500 gallons of water per hour during feeding.
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  • How do whale sharks protect themselves?

    Q: How do whale sharks protect themselves?

    A: As the largest fish in the world, whale sharks rely on their size to dissuade predators. Reaching up to 60 feet in length and weighing more than 20 tons upon maturity, adult whale sharks are only preyed upon by orcas and humans.
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  • What eats sea lions?

    Q: What eats sea lions?

    A: Killer whales and sharks eat sea lions. Although sea lions swim faster than both predators, killer whales and sharks are often able to surprise them before they can escape.
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  • What are baby seals called?

    Q: What are baby seals called?

    A: Newborn and baby seals are commonly referred to as pups until they are 5 years old. After the five-year mark, young seals are called yearlings.
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  • How fast can dolphins swim?

    Q: How fast can dolphins swim?

    A: The most common dolphin species, the bottlenose dolphin, has a top speed of 21.7 miles per hour. The fastest member of the dolphin family is the killer whale, which can reach speeds of more than 30 miles per hour.
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  • What are dolphins' enemies?

    Q: What are dolphins' enemies?

    A: Although dolphins are apex predators, they are sometimes eaten by sharks and killer whales; however, their primary predator is mankind. Dolphin pods attack sharks on sight, circling protectively around the weakest member of their group and attacking until the shark is driven away or killed. Dolphin remains have also been found in orca stomachs. Humans kill dolphins either by accident or intentionally during large-scale fishing operations.
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  • What sound does a walrus make?

    Q: What sound does a walrus make?

    A: Walruses are very loud and vocal animals that make an extraordinary range of sounds, including barks, moans, screams, whoops, wails, bellows, growls, snorts, sniffles and knocking sounds. Male walruses also sing complex and lengthy songs during breeding season.
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  • How much does a killer whale weigh?

    Q: How much does a killer whale weigh?

    A: According to Encyclopædia Britannica, a male killer whale can reach a length of more than 26 feet and weigh more than five tons. Females can reach 23 feet and weigh significantly less.
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  • Are harp seals endangered?

    Q: Are harp seals endangered?

    A: Harp seals are not an endangered species, according to Scientific American. However, scientists and colleagues at Duke University and the International Wildlife Fund have determined that a decrease of winter ice at harp seal breeding grounds is an ongoing threat.
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  • What is a whale skeleton made of?

    Q: What is a whale skeleton made of?

    A: Whales have skeletons that are mainly composed of the same materials as the skeletons of other vertebrates. These materials consist mainly of collagen fibers woven together with small, inorganic crystals, according to the University of Cambridge.
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