Marine Mammals

A:

Dolphins are able to hold their breath for 15 to 17 minutes underwater. Dolphins are actually a type of whale, and they breathe through their blow holes.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • How fast can dolphins swim?

    Q: How fast can dolphins swim?

    A: The most common dolphin species, the bottlenose dolphin, has a top speed of 21.7 miles per hour. The fastest member of the dolphin family is the killer whale, which can reach speeds of more than 30 miles per hour.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Are penguins mammals?

    Q: Are penguins mammals?

    A: Penguins are not mammals, even though they are warm-blooded animals. Penguins are one of only a few species of flightless birds left in the world. Many people mistakenly believe penguins have fur instead of feathers because of the extremely tight packing of the feathers on their bodies.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are some facts about sea otters?

    Q: What are some facts about sea otters?

    A: Sea otters are mammals that belong to the weasel family, have the densest fur of all animals and are a keystone species. As a keystone species, the sea otter is critical for the health and well-being of a great number of other species. They are the heaviest weasels and the second smallest marine mammals.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Are dolphins more intelligent than humans?

    Q: Are dolphins more intelligent than humans?

    A: Research indicates that, by human measures for intelligence, dolphins are the second-most intelligent species on the planet. MRI scans show that dolphins are self-aware, and other research suggests that the marine mammals have a special vulnerability for suffering and trauma.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why do otters hold hands?

    Q: Why do otters hold hands?

    A: While it may appear to be adorable, sea otters hold hands for a practical purpose. The behavior known as 'rafting' is where single sex groups of sea otters numbering anywhere from two to several hundred group together, often holding hands to prevent themselves from drifting apart.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why do whales jump out of the water?

    Q: Why do whales jump out of the water?

    A: While scientists do not know for certain, there are several theories as to why whales jump out of the water. Common suggestions for the behavior include the attempt to communicate or an act of courtship. Humpbacks are known best for this behavior, which is known as "breaching."
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What does the inside of a whale look like?

    Q: What does the inside of a whale look like?

    A: Whales are not fish, but mammals, and the inside of a whale looks similar to that of a land mammal. They have skeletons with long backbones, circulatory systems similar to warm-blooded animals, large hearts and lungs, large teeth and inner ears that are adapted to hear underwater. To provide buoyancy, store energy and insulate them against cold temperatures, whales have a layer of blubber under their skin.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the name for a baby whale?

    Q: What is the name for a baby whale?

    A: A baby whale is called a calf. Birth seasons and gestation periods vary among whale species. Most whale calf births are single, but twin births do happen occasionally.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Is the blue whale larger than a dinosaur?

    Q: Is the blue whale larger than a dinosaur?

    A: At 170 to 200 tons, the blue whale is larger than any dinosaur known to have lived. The largest dinosaur lived in the Mesozoic Era and was the Argentinosaurus, which weighed up to 99 tons.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are the adaptations of a pygmy hippo?

    Q: What are the adaptations of a pygmy hippo?

    A: The pygmy hippopotamus has several special adaptations for living in its environment, including major sensory organs on top of its head, strong muscles to keep ears and nostrils shut underwater and secretions of a red liquid that moisturizes the skin. These special adaptations are ideal for the creature's aquatic habitat.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How long can dolphins hold their breath?

    Q: How long can dolphins hold their breath?

    A: According to the Institute for Marine Mammal studies, dolphins can generally hold their breath for as long as 10 minutes. They normally breathe about four to five times per minute.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a baby sea lion called?

    Q: What is a baby sea lion called?

    A: A baby sea lion is called a pup. When born, pups are usually about 2.5 feet long and weigh between 13 and 20 pounds, but can weigh as much as 50 pounds.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What adaptations do walruses have?

    Q: What adaptations do walruses have?

    A: The most prominent adaptations of walruses are their tusks, which they use for many purposes. Other adaptations include sensitive whiskers, which help them locate food, and the blubber under their thick skins, which provides energy and protects them against the arctic cold.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Do whales have hair?

    Q: Do whales have hair?

    A: Whales have hair, as all species of whales are aquatic mammals. Instead of having scales, like most other marine animals, whales have a fine layer of hair over their bodies.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Are whales herbivores?

    Q: Are whales herbivores?

    A: Whales are carnivores, not herbivores. Herbivores have strictly plant-based diets, while carnivores consume meat. A whale's typical diet includes octopus, fish, shrimp, krill and squid, making these mammals carnivores. A blue whale can consume 4 tons of krill daily.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why is the blue whale endangered?

    Q: Why is the blue whale endangered?

    A: The blue whale is endangered because it was hunted almost to extinction in the late 19th and early 20th century. Though the International Whaling Commission banned the hunting of blue whales in 1966, some countries continued to illegally hunt them until the 1970s.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is being done to save the humpback whales?

    Q: What is being done to save the humpback whales?

    A: Some of the conservation efforts to save humpback whales include the Atlantic Large Whale Take Reduction Plan, the Pacific Offshore Cetacean Take Reduction Plan, the Structure of Populations, Levels of Abundance and Status of Humpbacks project and the More North Atlantic Humpbacks project. In addition, safe boating practice education and humpback whale research and monitoring aid the effort to protect humpbacks.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How big is a whale's stomach?

    Q: How big is a whale's stomach?

    A: Depending upon the species, a whale's stomach can be enormous, holding up to 2,200 pounds of food in the case of the blue whale. This whale's main diet consists of krill and copepods filtered through stiff, comb-like teeth called baleen plates.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How does a dolphin protect itself?

    Q: How does a dolphin protect itself?

    A: The main mechanisms dolphins use to protect themselves include avoiding natural predators by detecting them with echolocation and traveling in numbers for safety. When they cannot avoid attacks or scare off predators, dolphins defend themselves by fighting with their attackers.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What do gray whales eat?

    Q: What do gray whales eat?

    A: Gray whales eat a wide variety of crustaceans, such as ghost shrimp and amphipods, along with many other organisms, including polychaete worms, herring eggs and animal larvae. They feed off the ocean bottom, sucking in a large amount of sediment, then forcing it out through their baleen plates. Food items are trapped in baleen filters and are scraped off by the whales' tongues to be digested.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Do dolphins live in coral reefs?

    Q: Do dolphins live in coral reefs?

    A: Dolphins live near coral reefs, but they do not live in coral reefs. Dolphins, like all other ocean species, benefit from a robust coral reef ecosystem, because reef inhabitants maintain the balance of nutrients that helps to normalize water quality.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: