Marine Life

A:

Jellyfish are carnivores and excellent predators. They sting with tentacles to subdue small aquatic fish, and eat the eggs and invertebrates that stick to their tentacles.

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  • How Many Legs Do Crayfish Have?

    Q: How Many Legs Do Crayfish Have?

    A: Crayfish have five pairs of legs, for a total of 10. Four of these pairs are considered "walking legs," while the fifth pair are the "chelipeds" or pinchers.
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  • What Are the Types of Eels?

    Q: What Are the Types of Eels?

    A: There are several species of eels, which fall into the families of either freshwater or saltwater eels. The two eel families are the family Anguillidae and the family Moninguidae. Eels in the first family share a common genus and reside primarily in North America; those in the latter class generally live in tropical locales and have different body shapes.
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  • Why Do Whales and Dolphins Beach Themselves?

    Q: Why Do Whales and Dolphins Beach Themselves?

    A: Whales and dolphins beach themselves, or end up beached, for reasons ranging from injury and illness to polluted water and simply becoming stranded at low tide. When these creatures travel in pods, the entire pod is likely to end up beached if the leader accidentally strands itself on shore, explains Mental Floss.
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  • What Is the Function of Gills in Crayfish?

    Q: What Is the Function of Gills in Crayfish?

    A: Crayfish use their gills to breathe. A crayfish has a gill at the base of each leg. These gills are very delicate and are covered by the crayfish's carapace, or shield. This carapace is aligned backwards from the head, allowing water to run through in a channel over the gills, which provides a continuous source of oxygen that allows the crayfish to breathe.
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  • What Eats Catfish?

    Q: What Eats Catfish?

    A: Catfish have a wide variety of predators, including snakes, raccoons, mink, otters, wading birds, alligators, crocodiles, large lizards, humans and other fish. As with most species, catfish have more predators when they are young than when they reach maturity. Some old, large catfish may effectively outgrow all of their predators except humans.
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  • Where Do Dolphins Live?

    Q: Where Do Dolphins Live?

    A: The 42 known species of dolphins live in the waters of oceans and rivers all over the world. Dolphins are found everywhere, from shallow coastal waters to the deep of the open ocean, and they migrate to and from certain areas due to water temperature and food availability.
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  • What Is the Biggest Animal in the Ocean?

    Q: What Is the Biggest Animal in the Ocean?

    A: The biggest animal in the ocean, and possibly the largest animal ever to live on Earth, is the blue whale. The maximum recorded weight for a 98-foot blue whale exceeded 209 tons. Longer whales, up to 110 feet, have been seen but not weighed.
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  • How Long Do Clams Live?

    Q: How Long Do Clams Live?

    A: Of the 15,000 species of bivalves known as clams, some have life cycles of only one year. Individuals of one species called the ocean quahog, or Arctica islandica, however, are among the oldest living animals on Earth, with one captured specimen measured to be more than 500 years of age.
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  • How Do Dolphins Use Echolocation?

    Q: How Do Dolphins Use Echolocation?

    A: Dolphins use echolocation for communicating with one another and for locating objects in their surrounding environments. Regardless of whether dolphins use echolocation for social purposes, such as communication, or for finding and avoiding obstacles, the mechanism of echolocation uses the same techniques. Dolphins generate beams or waves of clicking sounds, then pause to wait for a response, either from another dolphin or from an object.
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  • What Is a Narwhal?

    Q: What Is a Narwhal?

    A: Found in Arctic waters, the narwhal is related to the bottlenose dolphin, beluga, porpoise and orca. It is easily distinguishable by the sword-like spiralling tusk that grows through the upper lip of the male. The male's tusk can grow up to 8.8 feet in length although the female grows a much smaller tusk. The narwhal grows anywhere between 13 to 20 feet and weighs up to 3500 pounds.
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  • Can You Eat Barracuda?

    Q: Can You Eat Barracuda?

    A: The flesh of the barracuda sometimes carries the toxin ciguatera, although it is regularly eaten by humans. Symptoms of ciguatera poisoning include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Neurological symptoms, such as headaches, paresthesia and vertigo, often follow. Scarce treatment options exist for ciguatera poisoning, although recovery is possible in time.
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  • What Is a Baby Whale Called?

    Q: What Is a Baby Whale Called?

    A: A baby whale is called a calf, its mother is a cow and its father is a bull. Because whales are mammals, they give birth to their live babies and nurse them in infancy. A calf lives in the mother's uterus during gestation and is fed through an umbilical cord. Most whales give birth to a single calf at a time, but several instances have been recorded in which twin calves have been born in the wild.
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  • Are Lobsters Related to Cockroaches?

    Q: Are Lobsters Related to Cockroaches?

    A: Both lobsters and cockroaches are arthropods, making them distant relatives. An arthropod is a member of the phylum Arthropoda, which includes insects, crustaceans and arachnids. Arthropods are characterized by a jointed exoskeleton composed of chitin, a segmented body and jointed appendages.
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  • What Do Piranhas Eat?

    Q: What Do Piranhas Eat?

    A: Piranha are carnivores that eat live prey and can also feed on insects, plants and even their own kind. These voraciously hungry fish tend to have a lurk-and-ambush style of attack that occurs en masse, with large groups of piranha feeding at once.
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  • How Do Crayfish Protect Themselves?

    Q: How Do Crayfish Protect Themselves?

    A: Crayfish, which are freshwater crustaceans closely related to lobsters, have large claws with which they threaten predators and protect themselves. In addition, when crayfish are frightened, they make menacing gestures with their claws, propel themselves backwards and use their tails to throw mud at their enemies.
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  • How Long Can a Leopard Seal Hold Its Breath?

    Q: How Long Can a Leopard Seal Hold Its Breath?

    A: According to National Geographic, a leopard seal can hold its breath for up to 10 minutes. This is due to an adaptation that allows the seal to store an extremely large amount of oxygen within the blood and muscles, about three times as much as humans based on weight.
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  • What Are the Differences Between Dolphins and Porpoises?

    Q: What Are the Differences Between Dolphins and Porpoises?

    A: A dolphin's slimmer body, beak-like nose and curved fins distinguish it from the porpoise's stout build, rounded face and triangular fins, according to the National Ocean Service. Although they are different species, dolphins and porpoises both belong to order Cetacea. Approximately 32 dolphin species have been discovered, while only six known porpoise species exist.
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  • What Are Some Tips for Seashell Identification?

    Q: What Are Some Tips for Seashell Identification?

    A: Seashells can often be identified by their shape, size, color and habitat, but since there are at least 100,000 species of mollusks, a printed or online identification guide can help. Seashell identification guides provide photographs for comparison, taxonomic details and clues to help differentiate between similar species.
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  • What Is a Group of Stingrays Called?

    Q: What Is a Group of Stingrays Called?

    A: A group of stingrays is called a fever. Stingrays normally travel in groups to hunt but are also known to travel individually and in pairs.
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  • What Color Is Coral?

    Q: What Color Is Coral?

    A: Coral is a colorless marine animal that lives on the ocean floor and can be red, orange and other colors. Any color that appears to be present on coral is a buildup of algae that live on the coral. Like other animals of the sea, coral can change color with emotion.
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  • How Do Killer Whales Protect Themselves?

    Q: How Do Killer Whales Protect Themselves?

    A: Adult killer whales are top-end predators and have no need to protect themselves from natural enemies. Killer whale calves are protected by their mothers and by other members of the pods to which they belong.
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