Marine Life

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Jellyfish are animals of the phylum Cnidaria, class Scyphozoa, order Semaeostomeae and family Cyaneidae. The phylum Cnidaria is an incredibly ancient group of invertebrate animals, stretching back hundreds of millions of years. Jellyfish are among the oldest types of multicellular animals. True jellyfish have a number of distinguishing characteristics by which they are classified.

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  • What do piranhas eat?

    Q: What do piranhas eat?

    A: Piranha are carnivores that eat live prey and can also feed on insects, plants and even their own kind. These voraciously hungry fish tend to have a lurk-and-ambush style of attack that occurs en masse, with large groups of piranha feeding at once.
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  • What are types of aquatic animals?

    Q: What are types of aquatic animals?

    A: Types of aquatic animals include marine mammals such as whales, dolphins, sea lions, seals, manatees and walruses. Other types are fish, including bony fish such as groupers and cartilaginous fish such as sharks and rays. Invertebrate aquatic animals include sponges, corals, sea stars, sea anemones, sea urchins and sea cucumbers. Other examples include sand dollars, jellyfish and colony animals such as the Portuguese man-of-war, marine worms, clams, mussels and barnacles.
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  • How long do crayfish live?

    Q: How long do crayfish live?

    A: According to Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, the average lifespan of crayfish is between two and three years. These crustaceans tend to grow to 3 or 4 inches long in Montana but have been known to grow up to 16 inches long in southern states.
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  • Where do oysters live?

    Q: Where do oysters live?

    A: Oysters are most often found along the Atlantic Coasts and the Gulf of Mexico in North America. They live in estuaries, bays, tidal creeks and even in sounds. Oysters can survive in brackish- to full-strength seawater.
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  • What is a baby whale called?

    Q: What is a baby whale called?

    A: A baby whale is called a calf, its mother is a cow and its father is a bull. Because whales are mammals, they give birth to their live babies and nurse them in infancy. A calf lives in the mother's uterus during gestation and is fed through an umbilical cord.
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  • How big was the largest lobster ever recorded?

    Q: How big was the largest lobster ever recorded?

    A: The biggest recorded lobster ever caught weighed 44 pounds, 6 ounces and was caught in 1977. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, it was taken from the waters off the coast of Nova Scotia, and it measured 3 feet 5 inches from the tip of its largest claw to the end of its tail fan.
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  • What endangered species are in the ocean biome?

    Q: What endangered species are in the ocean biome?

    A: There are numerous endangered species in the ocean, many of which are whales and turtles. Some notable examples are the blue whale, sperm whale, Kemp's ridley turtle and hawksbill turtle. There are also some plants listed as endangered ocean species.
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  • Why do whales and dolphins beach themselves?

    Q: Why do whales and dolphins beach themselves?

    A: Whales and dolphins beach themselves, or end up beached, for reasons ranging from injury and illness to polluted water and simply becoming stranded at low tide. When these creatures travel in pods, the entire pod is likely to end up beached if the leader accidentally strands itself on shore, explains Mental Floss.
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  • What color are starfish?

    Q: What color are starfish?

    A: Starfish color varies depending on the species and even the presence or absence of environmental threats — most species have the ability to change color, via camouflage, to match their surroundings. Some starfish are naturally tan and dark brown, while others may be light pink or crimson red.
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  • What are some facts about the monk seal?

    Q: What are some facts about the monk seal?

    A: As of 2014, there are two remaining species of monk seal in the world: the Hawaiian monk seal and the Mediterranean monk seal, both named for the places where they live. A third species, the Caribbean monk seal, was last sighted in 1952 and is considered extinct. Monk seals are unusual in that, unlike most other seals, they prefer a warmer climate with temperate waters and sandy beaches.
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  • Are lobsters related to cockroaches?

    Q: Are lobsters related to cockroaches?

    A: Both lobsters and cockroaches are arthropods, making them distant relatives. An arthropod is a member of the phylum Arthropoda, which includes insects, crustaceans and arachnids. Arthropods are characterized by a jointed exoskeleton composed of chitin, a segmented body and jointed appendages.
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  • How many pounds does a baby blue whale gain during its first day after birth?

    Q: How many pounds does a baby blue whale gain during its first day after birth?

    A: A baby blue whale gains about 200 pounds during its first day after birth. In fact, the young whale maintains this daily weight gain throughout its entire first year of life by feeding exclusively on its mother's milk. Each day the newborn also grows about one inch longer.
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  • What do seahorses eat?

    Q: What do seahorses eat?

    A: Seahorses feed on small crustaceans. Some of the favorites for seashores are shrimp and zooplankton, though they will eat nearly any live food.
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  • How long do clams live?

    Q: How long do clams live?

    A: Of the 15,000 species of bivalves known as clams, some have life cycles of only one year. Individuals of one species called the ocean quahog, or Arctica islandica, however, are among the oldest living animals on Earth, with one captured specimen measured to be more than 500 years of age.
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  • What do bottle nose dolphins eat?

    Q: What do bottle nose dolphins eat?

    A: Coastal bottlenose dolphins prefer bottom-dwelling fish and invertebrates, while offshore dolphins eat a variety of fish and squid. More ingenious feeders have been known to trail fishing boats, in the hopes of snagging some leftovers.
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  • What is a group of stingrays called?

    Q: What is a group of stingrays called?

    A: A group of stingrays is called a fever. Stingrays normally travel in groups to hunt but are also known to travel individually and in pairs.
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  • How strong is an electric eel's shock?

    Q: How strong is an electric eel's shock?

    A: Electric eels can emit up to 600 volts of electricity. The specific electrical output is approximately 100 volts per foot of eel. An eel's shock is strong enough to electrocute a full-grown horse.
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  • How many legs do crayfish have?

    Q: How many legs do crayfish have?

    A: Crayfish have five pairs of legs, for a total of 10. Four of these pairs are considered "walking legs," while the fifth pair are the "chelipeds" or pinchers.
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  • How do dolphins use echolocation?

    Q: How do dolphins use echolocation?

    A: Dolphins use echolocation for communicating with one another and for locating objects in their surrounding environments. Regardless of whether dolphins use echolocation for social purposes, such as communication, or for finding and avoiding obstacles, the mechanism of echolocation uses the same techniques. Dolphins generate beams or waves of clicking sounds, then pause to wait for a response, either from another dolphin or from an object.
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  • What are some tips for seashell identification?

    Q: What are some tips for seashell identification?

    A: Seashells can often be identified by their shape, size, color and habitat, but since there are at least 100,000 species of mollusks, a printed or online identification guide can help. Seashell identification guides provide photographs for comparison, taxonomic details and clues to help differentiate between similar species.
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  • How long can a leopard seal hold its breath?

    Q: How long can a leopard seal hold its breath?

    A: According to National Geographic, a leopard seal can hold its breath for up to 10 minutes. This is due to an adaptation that allows the seal to store an extremely large amount of oxygen within the blood and muscles, about three times as much as humans based on weight.
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