Marine Life

A:

If you are attacked by a shark, it is important to fight back and get out of the water as soon as possible, but there are also important tips to learn to avoid a shark encounter. Sharks generally don’t like to eat humans. When sharks bite humans it is usually a “hit and run,” where they bite the human out of curiosity and swim away. This usually happens in shallow water and is rarely lethal.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • What Are Some Facts About the Monk Seal?

    Q: What Are Some Facts About the Monk Seal?

    A: As of 2014, there are two remaining species of monk seal in the world: the Hawaiian monk seal and the Mediterranean monk seal, both named for the places where they live. A third species, the Caribbean monk seal, was last sighted in 1952 and is considered extinct. Monk seals are unusual in that, unlike most other seals, they prefer a warmer climate with temperate waters and sandy beaches.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Symbolism of Seashells?

    Q: What Is the Symbolism of Seashells?

    A: Most commonly, the seashell is associated with love and fertility, but the meaning ascribed to seashells differs depending on the source and type of seashell. For example, medieval Christian tradition associates the seashell with pilgrims. Artists and art movements, such as practitioners of Feng Shui, also have different interpretations of the symbolism of seashells.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Kind of Predators Does a Sea Snake Have?

    Q: What Kind of Predators Does a Sea Snake Have?

    A: Birds of prey, sharks, large fish, eels and crocodiles are predators of the sea snake. Sea snakes live in shallow waters and breathe air using a long lung that also assists in buoyancy. Although the sea snake isn't aggressive, it produces some of the deadliest venom in the world.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Much Food Does a Baby Seahorse Eat a Day?

    Q: How Much Food Does a Baby Seahorse Eat a Day?

    A: Like adult seahorses, seahorse babies, which are also known as fry, eat a lot of food in a single day; these tiny creatures can eat as much as 3,000 pieces of food a day. As adults, seahorses will typically eat on no fewer than 30 occasions per day, with as many as 50 eating episodes taking place in a 24-hour period. This voracious appetite is related to the fact that the seahorse has no stomach and has a digestive system that has been described as inefficient, meaning this sea creature must eat a lot in order to stay properly nourished.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Are the Differences Between Sponges and Cnidarians?

    Q: What Are the Differences Between Sponges and Cnidarians?

    A: Cnidarians have groups of similar cells that work together as tissues, while sponges have no tissues, only disconnected regions of specialized cells. Each group has a type of cell unique to their group: Sponges have collar cells, and cnidarians have nematocysts. No sponges are capable of movement as adults, while some cnidarians move as adults.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Do Piranhas Eat?

    Q: What Do Piranhas Eat?

    A: Piranha are carnivores that eat live prey and can also feed on insects, plants and even their own kind. These voraciously hungry fish tend to have a lurk-and-ambush style of attack that occurs en masse, with large groups of piranha feeding at once.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Do Seahorses Eat?

    Q: What Do Seahorses Eat?

    A: Seahorses feed on small crustaceans. Some of the favorites for seashores are shrimp and zooplankton, though they will eat nearly any live food.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Are Some Tips for Seashell Identification?

    Q: What Are Some Tips for Seashell Identification?

    A: Seashells can often be identified by their shape, size, color and habitat, but since there are at least 100,000 species of mollusks, a printed or online identification guide can help. Seashell identification guides provide photographs for comparison, taxonomic details and clues to help differentiate between similar species.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Defense Mechanism of the Sea Cucumber?

    Q: What Is the Defense Mechanism of the Sea Cucumber?

    A: Sea cucumbers expel their internal organs through their anus to distract and ward off predators. They also evacuate their organs on a seasonal basis, regenerating them afterwards. In addition, some sea cucumbers have special, sticky tubules, part of their respiratory system, which they spew at predators.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Many Whales Are Left in the World?

    Q: How Many Whales Are Left in the World?

    A: The best estimates from the International Whaling Commission indicate that there are roughly 1.7 million whales in the world. However, it is impossible to count the number of whales or any other ocean-dwelling creature accurately, and thus, the real number of whales in the world may be significantly lower or higher than this figure.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Where Do Dolphins Live?

    Q: Where Do Dolphins Live?

    A: The 42 known species of dolphins live in the waters of oceans and rivers all over the world. Dolphins are found everywhere, from shallow coastal waters to the deep of the open ocean, and they migrate to and from certain areas due to water temperature and food availability.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do Animals Communicate Underwater?

    Q: How Do Animals Communicate Underwater?

    A: According to Discovery of Sound in the Sea, animals use sound to communicate underwater. They emit different types of sounds and gather information on their surroundings by the echoes from those sounds, a process called echolocation.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Are the Types of Eels?

    Q: What Are the Types of Eels?

    A: There are several species of eels, which fall into the families of either freshwater or saltwater eels. The two eel families are the family Anguillidae and the family Moninguidae. Eels in the first family share a common genus and reside primarily in North America; those in the latter class generally live in tropical locales and have different body shapes.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do Sea Stars Eat?

    Q: How Do Sea Stars Eat?

    A: Sea stars eat either by turning their stomachs inside out and releasing digestive enzymes onto prey or by catching drifting food items and moving them down to their mouths. Sea stars are slow-moving animals, so any prey must be similarly slow-moving or even unmoving. Many sea stars specialize in feeding on slow-moving or sessile bivalves such as clams and mussels or even on other sea stars.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Biggest Animal in the Ocean?

    Q: What Is the Biggest Animal in the Ocean?

    A: The biggest animal in the ocean, and possibly the largest animal ever to live on Earth, is the blue whale. The maximum recorded weight for a 98-foot blue whale exceeded 209 tons. Longer whales, up to 110 feet, have been seen but not weighed.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do You Care for Mantis Shrimp?

    Q: How Do You Care for Mantis Shrimp?

    A: About.com points out that it is easy to care for mantis shrimp, as they are very low-maintenance pets; they require a small amount of food and a clean aquatic habitat. The mantis shrimp prefers live food but eats dead food as well, including bits of shrimp, mussel, squid and snail. The shrimp does not need to be fed more than twice a week.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Long Do Crayfish Live?

    Q: How Long Do Crayfish Live?

    A: According to Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, the average lifespan of crayfish is between two and three years. These crustaceans tend to grow to 3 or 4 inches long in Montana but have been known to grow up to 16 inches long in southern states.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do Killer Whales Protect Themselves?

    Q: How Do Killer Whales Protect Themselves?

    A: Adult killer whales are top-end predators and have no need to protect themselves from natural enemies. Killer whale calves are protected by their mothers and by other members of the pods to which they belong.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Are the Names of Some Scary Deep Sea Creatures?

    Q: What Are the Names of Some Scary Deep Sea Creatures?

    A: Angler fish, Pacific Viperfish, Wolfish, Goblin Shark and Sloane's Viperfish are just a few of the terrifying fish lurking in the ocean's depths. Once you move past the point where light reaches, the world's oceans turn into a terrifying place filled with strange creatures.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Are Some Facts About Manatees?

    Q: What Are Some Facts About Manatees?

    A: Manatees are large, slow-moving aquatic mammals. They swim at speeds of about 5 mph, although they can triple that speed in very short bursts. Although slow, they are excellent swimmers, and are able to perform nimble water gymnastics.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Eats Catfish?

    Q: What Eats Catfish?

    A: Catfish have a wide variety of predators, including snakes, raccoons, mink, otters, wading birds, alligators, crocodiles, large lizards, humans and other fish. As with most species, catfish have more predators when they are young than when they reach maturity. Some old, large catfish may effectively outgrow all of their predators except humans.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: