Lizards

A:

A marine iguana removes salt from its body through salt glands located in the cranial cavity. These glands connect to the marine iguana's nasal cavity, allowing for expulsion when the marine iguana blows forcefully.

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  • What Is the Lifespan of a Lizard?

    Q: What Is the Lifespan of a Lizard?

    A: The lifespan of most lizard species varies from 1 to 20 years in length. The lizard species and whether or not it lives in captivity, is the reason for the variance in life expectancy. There are more than 3,800 species of lizards.
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  • What Does a Skink Lizard Eat?

    Q: What Does a Skink Lizard Eat?

    A: The skink lizard is always on the lookout for a meal, and they mainly eat insects. Crickets, beetles, caterpillars, grasshoppers, spiders, slugs, snails, earthworms, small mice and even other lizards are all on the menu for the skink lizard.
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  • How Do Lizards Move?

    Q: How Do Lizards Move?

    A: Most species of lizard are quadrupedal and crawl using their four limbs and tail. Certain species are legless and slither like snakes. Some lizards, such as geckos, can adhere to vertical or inverted surfaces and move freely on them.
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  • How Do You Tell If a Bearded Dragon Is Sick?

    Q: How Do You Tell If a Bearded Dragon Is Sick?

    A: Bearded dragons show sickness through deformities, stunted growth, seizures, loss of coloration, paralysis, labored breathing, mucus discharge, diarrhea, lack of appetite and weight loss. Some of these symptoms indicate genetic deficiencies that cannot be helped, but other conditions can be amended by making adjustments to the bearded dragon's environment or diet.
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  • In Which Type of Biome Can a Komodo Dragon Usually Be Found?

    Q: In Which Type of Biome Can a Komodo Dragon Usually Be Found?

    A: Komodo dragons prefer hot, dry areas at low elevation. They are typically found in grasslands, savannas and forests in central Indonesia. Young Komodo dragons seek forested areas and live in trees until they are eight months old.
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  • What Is the Difference Between Lizards and Geckos?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Lizards and Geckos?

    A: Geckos are types of lizards, but have several physical features, such as shorter and broader heads and sticky feet, that distinguish them from other types of lizards. Geckos and lizards live in many areas around the world and are particularly well-suited for life in hot and dry locations, such as the American southwest and deserts in the Middle East.
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  • What Are the Life Stages of a Lizard?

    Q: What Are the Life Stages of a Lizard?

    A: Lizards pass through three different life stages, beginning as eggs, hatching into juveniles and ultimately becoming mature adults. Most juveniles resemble miniature versions of the adults, while others experience a change in color or body proportions as they grow. Some lizards pass through all three life stages within the course of one year, while others live long lives, taking many years to hatch and mature into adults.
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  • Can Chameleons Eat Fruits?

    Q: Can Chameleons Eat Fruits?

    A: Tarantulas.com explains that chameleons eat a variety of fruits, including apples, strawberries, mangoes, papayas and raspberries. Chameleons also eat vegetables such as carrots and squash as well leafy greens, such as kale, romaine and endive. Dandelions and hibiscus flowers are also food sources for chameleons.
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  • What Are Komodo Dragons' Adaptations?

    Q: What Are Komodo Dragons' Adaptations?

    A: Komodo dragons have several key adaptations, including long and sharp claws, sharp teeth and strong jaws, powerful venom and the ability to run at high speeds. Komodo dragons can grow to be quite large, but despite their size, they rely on several physical characteristics to help them survive. They live on the Lesser Sunda Islands of Indonesia, and they are the top predators in their native range.
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  • What Is a Baby Chameleon Called?

    Q: What Is a Baby Chameleon Called?

    A: Baby chameleons are simply known as “chameleons," whethet they are babies or not. They may also be called hatchlings when they are first born. A hatchling is a young reptile or bird that has hatched or emerged from within an egg.
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  • What Do Lizards Eat?

    Q: What Do Lizards Eat?

    A: Every lizard species has unique dietary needs, because lizards are a group of reptiles spanning up to 6,000 species rather than a single species. Potential pet owners should research their species' dietary needs before bringing home an animal.
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  • What Do Baby Lizards Eat?

    Q: What Do Baby Lizards Eat?

    A: Baby lizards are able to eat the same things that adult lizards eat, so no special diet is required for babies. The diet of a baby lizard is dependent on the diet of its species.
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  • What Type of Body Covering Do Reptiles Have?

    Q: What Type of Body Covering Do Reptiles Have?

    A: Reptiles are covered with scales. Unlike the scales of fish, reptile scales are not individual pieces. The entire outer layer of reptile skin is like a sheet of scales.
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  • What Do Bearded Dragons Eat?

    Q: What Do Bearded Dragons Eat?

    A: Bearded dragons are omnivores and eat a variety of plant and animal matter. Pet bearded dragons also eat prepared bearded dragon food, which often comes in pellet or freeze-dried varieties.
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  • Where Do Lizards Live?

    Q: Where Do Lizards Live?

    A: Lizards are distributed throughout the world, and as the San Diego Zoo notes, most of them live on the ground. Other common lizard dwelling places are underground burrows (especially in deserts), under rocks, marshy bogs and in trees.
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  • Does a Lizard Lay Eggs?

    Q: Does a Lizard Lay Eggs?

    A: Some lizards reproduce by laying eggs, while others give birth to live young. The lizard's mode of reproduction depends on its species. Iguanas, geckos and monitor lizards lay eggs; Solomon Island, blue-tongue and shingle-backed skinks reproduce by live birth.
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  • Who Are the Predators of the Komodo Dragon?

    Q: Who Are the Predators of the Komodo Dragon?

    A: Komodo dragons are the top predators in their range, and adults do not suffer predation by any species. Young Komodo dragons sometimes fall prey to predatory mammals, birds and other Komodo dragons. Juveniles live in trees as protection until they are large enough to defend themselves.
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  • What Will Keep Lizards Away From a House?

    Q: What Will Keep Lizards Away From a House?

    A: Garlic is just one product that will keep lizards away from a house. Residents should place the garlic cloves around the doors or other areas where the lizards enter the home.
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  • Where Do Komodo Dragons Live?

    Q: Where Do Komodo Dragons Live?

    A: Komodo dragons make their home in the Lesser Sunda Islands that are situated along the northern and eastern coasts of Indonesia. The Lesser Sunda Islands are remote and sparsely populated. They are characterized by a harsh and unforgiving climate, which few creatures can tolerate, but serves as a perfect habitat for the large predatory Komodo dragons.
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  • How Do Lizards Mate?

    Q: How Do Lizards Mate?

    A: Most lizards require a male and female pairing to mate; the male excretes an odor from a gland on the tail to which the female is attracted. Male lizards will mount female lizards to complete the mating process.
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  • Are Chameleons Endangered?

    Q: Are Chameleons Endangered?

    A: According to the National Wildlife Federation, there are over 180 different species of chameleons and only a few are in immediate danger of becoming extinct. Destroying a chameleon’s natural habitat is the biggest threat to its existence.
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