Lizards

A:

Depending on the species, it can take anywhere from several weeks to several months for a lizard egg to hatch. For pet lizards, such as Anoles, eggs should hatch at around the 4 to 6 week mark, whereas the eggs of larger, wild lizards, such as Komodo Dragons, can take 7 to 8 months to hatch.

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  • Do green anoles lay eggs?

    Q: Do green anoles lay eggs?

    A: Green anoles lay eggs. They willingly mate in captivity, and most females lay viable eggs. The real challenge is keeping the babies alive until they are able to fend for themselves.
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  • What will keep lizards away from a house?

    Q: What will keep lizards away from a house?

    A: Garlic is just one product that will keep lizards away from a house. Residents should place the garlic cloves around the doors or other areas where the lizards enter the home.
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  • Can chameleons eat fruits?

    Q: Can chameleons eat fruits?

    A: Tarantulas.com explains that chameleons eat a variety of fruits, including apples, strawberries, mangoes, papayas and raspberries. Chameleons also eat vegetables such as carrots and squash as well leafy greens, such as kale, romaine and endive. Dandelions and hibiscus flowers are also food sources for chameleons.
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  • What do lizards eat?

    Q: What do lizards eat?

    A: Every lizard species has unique dietary needs, because lizards are a group of reptiles spanning up to 6,000 species rather than a single species. Potential pet owners should research their species' dietary needs before bringing home an animal.
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  • Where do lizards go in the winter?

    Q: Where do lizards go in the winter?

    A: Lizards hibernate during the cold periods of the year, making their homes in tree trunks, rocks and wherever they can find shelter. Lizards are cold-blooded ecnotherms with no internal heating capabilities, so they must rely on heat from external sources. When winter comes, they are forced into hibernation.
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  • What do baby lizards eat?

    Q: What do baby lizards eat?

    A: Baby lizards are able to eat the same things that adult lizards eat, so no special diet is required for babies. The diet of a baby lizard is dependent on the diet of its species.
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  • How do you tell if a bearded dragon is sick?

    Q: How do you tell if a bearded dragon is sick?

    A: Bearded dragons show sickness through deformities, stunted growth, seizures, loss of coloration, paralysis, labored breathing, mucus discharge, diarrhea, lack of appetite and weight loss. Some of these symptoms indicate genetic deficiencies that cannot be helped, but other conditions can be amended by making adjustments to the bearded dragon's environment or diet.
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  • What are some leopard gecko facts?

    Q: What are some leopard gecko facts?

    A: Leopard geckos are desert-dwelling reptiles native to parts of southern Asia. Leopard geckos are among the larger gecko species and, unlike many gecko species, they possess eyelids and lack adhesive structures on their feet.
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  • What is a baby lizard called?

    Q: What is a baby lizard called?

    A: A baby lizard is often referred to as a hatchling, though this term is not exclusive to lizards as most animals that are hatched from eggs can also be referred to as such. It is possible that some individual species may have more specific names for their babies. As of June 2014, there are about 4,675 species of lizards throughout the world, located on every continent except Antarctica.
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  • What do bearded dragons eat?

    Q: What do bearded dragons eat?

    A: Bearded dragons are omnivores and eat a variety of plant and animal matter. Pet bearded dragons also eat prepared bearded dragon food, which often comes in pellet or freeze-dried varieties.
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  • How do you feed wild geckos?

    Q: How do you feed wild geckos?

    A: National Geographic reports that wild geckos usually eat insects, but some species may also occasionally consume fruit and flower nectar. About.com states that leopard geckos are the species of gecko most commonly kept in captivity. They should be fed crickets, waxworms and mealworms, and the insects should be coated with a calcium-vitamin D3 supplement before feeding consumption.
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  • Why do bearded dragons turn yellow?

    Q: Why do bearded dragons turn yellow?

    A: Typically, when a bearded dragon begins to turn yellow it is a sign that the reptile is not feeling well. If a bearded dragon experiences any abnormal changes in its skin, it should be seen immediately by a veterinarian.
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  • Are chameleons endangered?

    Q: Are chameleons endangered?

    A: According to the National Wildlife Federation, there are over 180 different species of chameleons and only a few are in immediate danger of becoming extinct. Destroying a chameleon’s natural habitat is the biggest threat to its existence.
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  • How long do chameleons live?

    Q: How long do chameleons live?

    A: Chameleons usually live two to three years in the wild. However, the life span of a captive chameleon can range between three and 10 years. Some species are reported to be capable of living upwards of 20 years.
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  • Which animals eat lizards?

    Q: Which animals eat lizards?

    A: The lizard has a wide variety of predators, including birds, snakes and even other lizards. When being chased or attacked by predators, lizards may swell up, hiss, break off their tails to escape or even change colors to blend in with their surroundings.
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  • Where do geckos live?

    Q: Where do geckos live?

    A: Geckos live on every continent except for Antarctica. They are mostly found in warm climates and live in numerous habitats, such as rain forests, deserts and even on cold mountain slopes.
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  • How do lizards move?

    Q: How do lizards move?

    A: Most species of lizard are quadrupedal and crawl using their four limbs and tail. Certain species are legless and slither like snakes. Some lizards, such as geckos, can adhere to vertical or inverted surfaces and move freely on them.
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  • What is the difference between lizards and geckos?

    Q: What is the difference between lizards and geckos?

    A: Geckos are types of lizards, but have several physical features, such as shorter and broader heads and sticky feet, that distinguish them from other types of lizards. Geckos and lizards live in many areas around the world and are particularly well-suited for life in hot and dry locations, such as the American southwest and deserts in the Middle East.
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  • What is the lifespan of a lizard?

    Q: What is the lifespan of a lizard?

    A: The lifespan of most lizard species varies from 1 to 20 years in length. The lizard species and whether or not it lives in captivity, is the reason for the variance in life expectancy. There are more than 3,800 species of lizards.
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  • Are yellow spotted lizards dangerous to humans?

    Q: Are yellow spotted lizards dangerous to humans?

    A: Yellow-spotted night lizards are not dangerous to humans. Lizards that belong to Lepidophyma flavimaculatum species have no poisonous glands and are not big enough to pose any real threat to a human.
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  • What does a skink lizard eat?

    Q: What does a skink lizard eat?

    A: The skink lizard is always on the lookout for a meal, and they mainly eat insects. Crickets, beetles, caterpillars, grasshoppers, spiders, slugs, snails, earthworms, small mice and even other lizards are all on the menu for the skink lizard.
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