Dinosaurs

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The smallest known dinosaur species include the Minmi, Pakicetus, Europasaurus, Phosphatherium, Microraptor, Raptorex, Microceratops, Lariosaurus and Nemicolopterus. These are all examples of the smallest dinos in a particular group, such as the smallest Raptor (Microraptor), which weighed around 2 pounds and was small enough to eat insects, and the smallest Tyrannosaur (Raptorex), which likely topped out at about 150 pounds.

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  • What Did Tyrannosaurus Rex Eat?

    Q: What Did Tyrannosaurus Rex Eat?

    A: Tyrannosaurus rex primarily ate herbivore dinosaurs, including the Edmontosaurus and the Triceratops. Studies suggest that the Tyrannosaurus rex also practiced cannibalism. Paleontologists believe that if two Tyrannosaurus rex dinosaurs fought to the death, the winner would eat the loser, based on bite marks found on Tyrannosaurus bones.
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  • What Is the Wingspan of a Pterodactyl?

    Q: What Is the Wingspan of a Pterodactyl?

    A: The wingspan of the largest species of pteranodon (the term employed by working paleontologists as opposed to the culturally popular term "pterodactyl") was up to 30 feet. This wingspan is much larger than that of any modern flying bird.
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  • What Is a Baby Dinosaur Called?

    Q: What Is a Baby Dinosaur Called?

    A: Dinosaurs are hatched from eggs, therefore new baby dinosaurs are called hatchlings, just like their reptile cousins the turtles and crocodiles. Young dinosaurs, beyond the hatchling stage, are referred to as juveniles.
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  • What Did Triceratops Eat?

    Q: What Did Triceratops Eat?

    A: Triceratops were herbivorous and probably ate low-growing plants because of their short necks and low heads. They may have eaten bushes, small trees and grasses. They may have been able to eat taller plants by knocking them down with their horns and beaks.
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  • When Did the Velociraptor Become Extinct?

    Q: When Did the Velociraptor Become Extinct?

    A: The velociraptor became extinct at the end of the Cretaceous Period due to an asteroid strike at the Yucatan Peninsula that occurred roughly 65 million years ago. This extinction event, known as the K-T boundary, also killed all other known species of non-avian dinosaurs.
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  • Did the Stegosaurus Have Two Brains?

    Q: Did the Stegosaurus Have Two Brains?

    A: Even though there was a popular theory that Stegosaurus may have had two brains, one in its head and one toward its tail or rear end, that idea has largely been discredited in paleontology. Some paleontologists may still hold on to this theory and try to find ways that it might be true, but on the whole, this is not an accepted idea.
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  • What Is Archaeopteryx Claim to Fame?

    Q: What Is Archaeopteryx Claim to Fame?

    A: Many scientists agree that Archaeopteryx is the earliest known bird in existence, giving it a unique claim to fame as the first of its kind. This winged animal may well represent an evolutionary midpoint between birds and reptiles, providing potential proof that modern birds evolved from prehistoric, birdlike reptilian ancestors.
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  • What Was the Longest Dinosaur?

    Q: What Was the Longest Dinosaur?

    A: Though there have been a few instances of scientists purporting to have found larger specimens, the longest known dinosaur that is widely accepted by paleontologists seems to be the Diplodocus, a type of sauropod dinosaur with a long neck and long tail that is said to have measured as much as 175 feet in length. There seems to be some controversy and debate around the question of which dinosaur is truly the longest, with scientists introducing competitors such as the Seismosaurus, which was once thought to be a distinct species but was eventually found to be a very large Diplodocus specimen. The Seismosaurus' discovery was announced in 1991, but its existence as a unique species was debunked just over a decade later, a fact that was announced at an academic event in 2004.
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  • What Do You Do If You Find a Dinosaur Bone?

    Q: What Do You Do If You Find a Dinosaur Bone?

    A: Individuals who believe that they have found a fossilized dinosaur bone in an outdoor area should avoid touching it and instead take a photo and make note of its exact location using a map before making contact with a natural history museum such as the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. However, this procedure is not legally binding, particularly if the fossil is discovered on private land, though moral obligation may tell a different story. In the United States, individuals who find a fossil on their land are not required to report or hand it over to any authority.
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  • Are There Animals Alive Today That Lived Beside Dinosaurs?

    Q: Are There Animals Alive Today That Lived Beside Dinosaurs?

    A: There are some animals on earth that can be traced back to the Mesozoic Era when dinosaurs walked the earth; these animals include monotremes such as the duckbill platypus, reptiles such as the crocodilians and sea creatures such as the sea urchin. For the most part, the animals that are alive today have made evolutionary changes from the forms they had when dinosaurs were alive. For example, though the event that caused dinosaurs to die out also killed many other reptile species, several surviving reptile species have direct ancestors from that era, including the crocodilians, which are smaller than their Mesozoic ancestors.
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  • What Did Dinosaurs Eat?

    Q: What Did Dinosaurs Eat?

    A: There is evidence that dinosaurs did not have a single, uniform and universal diet but rather a wide variety of dietary habits, with evidence supporting the idea that carnivorous, herbivorous and omnivorous species all existed. Different feeding styles were also likely, with some carnivorous species hunting prey such as mammals and small reptiles, while other carnivores may have been opportunistic carrion scavengers. There was likely even a good range of dietary variety amongst the herbivorous dinosaurs, which may have made up the majority of all dinosaur species.
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  • What Are the Two Classes of Dinosaurs?

    Q: What Are the Two Classes of Dinosaurs?

    A: Beginning in 1887, dinosaurs have been divided into two main categories: saurischian, which means "lizard hipped," and ornithischian, which means "bird hipped." This classification is based on the dinosaurs' pelvic bone structure. Though the name "bird hipped" may seem to indicate that these prehistoric animals are related to birds, that is not necessarily the case.
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  • What's the Largest Carnivore to Ever Live?

    Q: What's the Largest Carnivore to Ever Live?

    A: Based on fossil record, the dinosaur known as Spinosaurus and the prehistoric clade of marine mammals known as pliosaurs are the most apt top contenders for the title of "largest carnivore known to man." The Spinosaurus is the largest known carnivorous dinosaur, with fossil records indicating that this dinosaur could reach lengths of 50 feet and weigh more than 20 tons, but evidence of potential pliosaur size is inconclusive due to incomplete fossilized specimens. A partially fictionalized 1999 documentary from the BBC posited that there may have been pliosaurs that weighed more than 150 tons and were more than 82 feet long, but there is no fossil evidence to support this idea.
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  • Why Was the Brontosaurus's Name Changed to the Apatosaurus?

    Q: Why Was the Brontosaurus's Name Changed to the Apatosaurus?

    A: The gigantic, herbivorous Brontosaurus, which features an iconically long neck and tail, may be one of history's most famous dinosaurs, but its existence as a unique species was debunked in 1903, when someone realized that the skeleton that had been labeled as a Brontosaurus was actually an Apatosaurus. In this sense, the Brontosaurus was not renamed but rather determined to have never existed as a separate species. The same man, a Yale paleontologist named Othniel Charles (O.C.) Marsh, named both the Apatosaurus and the Brontosaurus, with the Apatosaurus discovery predating the Brontosaurus naming by two years.
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  • What Was the Largest Carniverous Dinosaur?

    Q: What Was the Largest Carniverous Dinosaur?

    A: The largest known carnivorous dinosaur is the Spinosaurus, which is so named thanks to the gigantic spikes that run down the dinosaur's back. These spikes form a "sail" that likely evolved to ward off enemies rather than predators. The Spinosaurus was likely too large to be preyed upon by other dinosaurs.
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  • Could a Dinosaur Be Cloned From DNA Preserved in Amber?

    Q: Could a Dinosaur Be Cloned From DNA Preserved in Amber?

    A: It is theoretically possible, though highly unlikely, that a dinosaur clone could be created. The idea that it's possible to clone a dinosaur using DNA preserved in amber was popularized by the movie Jurassic Park. This fictionalized version of the process made it seem like a relatively easy process, but in truth it's rather complex and improbable.
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  • What Was the Largest Dinosaur Ever?

    Q: What Was the Largest Dinosaur Ever?

    A: Most paleontologists believe that the Argentinosaurus was the largest dinosaur to have ever lived. It may have been the largest land animal to have ever existed.
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  • How Long Ago Did Dinosaurs Die Out?

    Q: How Long Ago Did Dinosaurs Die Out?

    A: The purported mass dinosaur die off known as the K-Pg extinction event took place during the end of the Cretaceous Period (K) during the Mesozoic Era some 65 million years ago. This scientific theory is based on the study of the fossil record, which shows evidence for the existence of dinosaurs during the Mesozoic Era but not during the proceeding Cenozoic Era. There is a clear line of demarcation, an actual line found in sedimentary rock layers known as the K-Pg Boundary, with the majority of the fossilized remains found below this line belonging to the "Age of Dinosaurs" not appearing in the space above the line, which marks the beginning of the Paleogene Period (Pg), the Cenozoic Era and the "Age of Mammals."
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  • Were Dinosaurs Mammals?

    Q: Were Dinosaurs Mammals?

    A: Though there were some dinosaurs with mammal-like qualities, dinosaurs were actually reptiles; however, though the word "dinosaur" roughly translates to "terrible lizard" in Greek, dinosaurs were not actually lizards, either. Dinosaurs represent a distinct group of reptiles that is now extinct, though there may be some living animals, including some birds, that are distant evolutionary relatives of the dinosaurs. The animals described as being mammal-like dinosaurs were actually early relatives of the dinosaur, and they were the dominant land animal about 260 million years ago, as opposed to the dinosaur, which was the dominant land animal about 231 million years ago.
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  • Were Dinosaurs Warm-Blooded or Cold-Blooded?

    Q: Were Dinosaurs Warm-Blooded or Cold-Blooded?

    A: Because dinosaurs are classified as reptiles, one might assume that they are cold blooded, but some scientists suggest that dinosaurs may have been somewhere between cold and warm blooded. Though most animals fall into either category, there have been some intermediary species known to science, with dinosaurs potentially being one of this number.
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  • Where Did Dinosaurs Live?

    Q: Where Did Dinosaurs Live?

    A: Scientists believe that the earth looked much different during the dinosaur's lifetime than it does today; at the advent of dinosaur life, all of the landmass on earth made up one single super continent known as Pangea. Dinosaurs likely did not live on every part of Pangea, instead concentrating in certain areas, including the land that is now known as Argentina, which is the home of the oldest known dinosaur fossil. Certain dinosaur species may have been localized to certain parts of the world, including the T.Rex, which has only been discovered in fossils found in North America.
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