Alligators

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Alligators can stay underwater for up to 24 hours if they need to, although most only stay submerged for 20 to 30 minutes. The alligator's body is specially developed to stay beneath the water if the circumstances call for it.

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  • What do you call a baby alligator?

    Q: What do you call a baby alligator?

    A: Baby alligators are called hatchlings. When hatchlings reach maturity, they grow to be approximately six feet long. Mature males are known as bulls, and mature females are referred to as cows.
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  • How long can an alligator stay underwater?

    Q: How long can an alligator stay underwater?

    A: Alligators can stay underwater for up to 24 hours if they need to, although most only stay submerged for 20 to 30 minutes. The alligator's body is specially developed to stay beneath the water if the circumstances call for it.
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  • What is a group of alligators called?

    Q: What is a group of alligators called?

    A: A congregation refers to a group of alligators, where the smaller alligators are compliant to the biggest, most dominant alligator. A group of newly hatched alligators, or juveniles, is referred to as a pod.
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  • How much does an alligator weigh?

    Q: How much does an alligator weigh?

    A: The American alligator can weigh up to 1,000 pounds and reach lengths of up to 15 feet, according to National Geographic. Female alligators are significantly shorter than males, at about 10 feet in length.
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  • What do alligator snapping turtles eat?

    Q: What do alligator snapping turtles eat?

    A: Alligator snapping turtles eat a variety of food, including fish, minnows and snakes. They will even eat dead fish and other turtles if the opportunity knocks.
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  • How do alligators communicate?

    Q: How do alligators communicate?

    A: Alligators communicate with one another by emitting deep, loud roaring sounds that travel as far as 165 yards. When alligators are courting, they release purring coughs, referred to as chumpfs. Baby alligators begin communicating with their mothers while they are still inside their eggs by emitting shrill whining noises to announce their arrival when they are preparing to hatch.
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  • Alligator vs. crocodile: is there any difference?

    Q: Alligator vs. crocodile: is there any difference?

    A: Crocodiles and alligators are members of the crocodilian species but belong to different families. Crocodiles are part of the crocodylidae family, whereas alligators are in the alligatoridae family. The most noticeable difference is the jaw shape. Alligators have a wider U-shaped snout, while crocodiles have a longer, more pointed V-shaped nose. Alligators can reach 15 feet long, whereas some species of crocodiles can grow from 17 to 20 feet.
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  • What is the bite pressure of an alligator?

    Q: What is the bite pressure of an alligator?

    A: The bite pressure of alligators is slightly different depending on the specific species, but saltwater crocodiles have the strongest bites. Their jaws generate up to 3,700 pounds per square inch, or 16,460 newtons, of bite pressure at a time. The bite force generated by crocodiles is quite significant, and is comparable to the bite force produced by historic predators, such as the T. rex.
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  • Who are the enemies of alligators?

    Q: Who are the enemies of alligators?

    A: According to LiveScience, the only natural enemies of alligators 4 feet or larger are other alligators. Before reaching this size, young alligators are preyed upon by raccoons, bobcats and wading birds, among other animals. Human-related activities, such as poaching and territorial encroachment, remain threats.
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  • How fast can alligators run on land?

    Q: How fast can alligators run on land?

    A: According to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, alligators can run up to 35 mph on land. Although these animals are frighteningly quick runners, they are only able achieve these speeds in short bursts and maintain it for only very short distances.
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  • Where do alligators live?

    Q: Where do alligators live?

    A: American alligators live in the southeastern portion of the United States, with largest populations residing in Florida and Louisiana. The Chinese alligator is native to China.
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  • How do alligators breathe underwater?

    Q: How do alligators breathe underwater?

    A: Alligators actually don't breathe underwater. Though they can stay submerged for long periods of time, they must eventually surface to breathe through the nostrils on their long snouts.
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  • Q: What is the albino alligator's habitat?

    A: The habitat of the albino alligator is the same as the habitat of pigmented alligators and includes freshwater environments in the southeast United States. As the albino alligator has almost no chance of survival in the wild due to its lack of pigmentation, it is dependent upon living in zoos.
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  • Q: How many alligators live in Florida?

    A: Around 1.25 million alligators live in Florida, which is equal to a little more than 20 percent of the entire American alligator population in the United States. Alligators living in Florida are found in freshwater environments like rivers, ponds, swamps, wetlands and marshes.
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  • Q: What adaptations do alligators exhibit?

    A: The alligator exhibits many adaptations, including its camouflaged hide, webbed toes, large tail and well-placed eyes and nostrils. The muscular jaws and sharp teeth enable the alligator to grip prey and tear apart flesh.
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  • Q: When is the alligator mating season?

    A: The mating season of the American alligator typically lasts from April to June. During this time, the overall activity level of alligators increases. Mother alligators move to build nests, while juvenile alligators try to avoid encounters with adult alligators because adult alligators are known to occasionally kill juveniles.
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  • Q: How high can alligators jump?

    A: Alligators can jump 6 feet into the air from a state of rest, despite large bodies and short limbs. They demonstrate quick bursts of speed, to chase down prey that initially seems too fast and unattainable; therefore, observers are advised to stay at least 20 feet in distance from alligators.
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  • Q: Are there alligators in South Carolina?

    A: In the United States, alligators can be found in the southeast, including in South Carolina. They can also be found in Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi and Louisiana.
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  • Q: What is the scientific name for the alligator?

    A: The scientific name of the American alligator is Alligator mississippiensis, while the scientific name for the Chinese alligator is Alligator sinensis. The American alligator is part of the Crocodilia order and the Alligatoridae family, and it can be found in the Southern United States.
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  • Q: How fast can an alligator run?

    A: An alligator can run at a speed of 11 miles per hour for short distances. In water, alligators can swim at a speed of about 20 miles per hour.
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  • Q: What do alligator gar eat?

    A: Alligator gar eat any animal they can catch, including other fish, ducks, turtles, small mammals and carrion. They are ambush predators that sit and wait for prey to pass close by before attacking. They are generally slow moving but are capable of bursts of speed to capture prey.
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