Q:

What eats emperor penguins?

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Quick Answer

According to Encyclopedia Britannica, emperor penguins are preyed upon by killer whales, leopard seals and giant fulmars. A native of Antarctica, the emperor penguin is the largest species of penguin in the world, approaching 50 inches in length and 55 to 100 pounds in weight.

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What eats emperor penguins?
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Full Answer

The emperor penguin subsists on a diet of krill, fish and squid. As the world's deepest diving bird, it can dive to a depth of 1,800 feet in search of food and remain under water for 22 minutes. Emperor penguins breed between March and April and are known to be monogamous at times despite large colony sizes and lack of permanent nests.

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