Q:

Is my dog too old to breed?

A:

Quick Answer

According to the American Kennel Club, both male and female dogs are considered to be too old to breed once they reach 12 years of age. A successful breeding can occur after this age, but the standard is in place for the health of the prospective offspring.

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Is my dog too old to breed?
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Full Answer

Smaller dogs typically reach sexual maturity faster than larger dogs. Male dogs are usually fertile at 6 months old and reach full sexual maturity by the 15th month. Female dogs undergo a similar timetable for fertility, although they should not mate during their first estrus cycle. Before breeding, the AKC recommends testing both partners for brucellosis, a disease capable of causing sterility or aborted pregnancies.

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