Q:

How big do sharks get?

A:

Quick Answer

A shark's size depends on the type of shark that it is, as the great white shark can grow as long as 20 feet, while the dwarf lantern shark only grows as long as 6.3 to 6.8 inches. To determine the size of a shark, a researcher first determines the shark's species, and then looks at the data available for that given shark species.

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Full Answer

Another one of the smaller sharks is the spined pygmy shark, which grows as long as 6.7 to 7.8 inches. There are many other species of shark that all range between the smallest shark's 10 inches to the great white shark's 20 feet, including the hammerhead shark, the nurse shark, the sand tiger shark, the bull shark and the whale shark. Sharks are powerful creatures and are considered one of the fiercest predators in the ocean.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What size was the largest great white shark ever caught?

    A:

    There are numerous discrepancies over the size of the largest great white ever caught, but the Canadian Shark Research Center claims that the largest, accurately measured great white shark was caught in 1988 off Prince Edward Island and was a length of 20 feet. Other recorded shark captures seem to be exaggerated or miscalculated, according to scientists who study marine life.

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  • Q:

    What eats a shark?

    A:

    Though sharks are considered apex predators, they are often eaten by humans and are sometimes eaten by killer whales. Shark embryos from different fathers will also eat each other in utero, with the largest embryo of the bunch usually winning out.

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  • Q:

    What does the great white shark eat?

    A:

    Great white sharks eat mainly seals and sea lions. They also eat other types of fish and even sea turtles. Seals are a good source for great white sharks due to their large body fat ratios.

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  • Q:

    How does a shark protect itself?

    A:

    The 400 living species of sharks defend themselves in a variety of ways that vary from species to species. Large species, such as great whites, basking sharks and whale sharks derive protection from their size; they are too big to represent potential prey for any species except humans. Other species, such as carpet sharks, rely on their flattened morphology and cryptic coloration to avoid the detection of predators.

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