Q:

What do baby garden snakes eat?

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Quick Answer

Baby garter snakes, or garden snakes, eat mostly worms, small fish and tadpoles in the wild. In captivity, they can be fed worms, small fish and pinkies.

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Full Answer

Garter snakes have large litters, and many of the snakes do not survive due to insufficient food. In captivity, most breeders find them very difficult to keep fed, especially in the early days. It is recommended to feed them separately to make sure each snake gets enough food and so that they do not accidentally eat each other. Feeding the snakes food that does not move is tricky and may take some time to work.

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