Pets & Animals

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Baby turtle diets vary from one species to the next. For example, painted turtle hatchlings consume small animals while they are young before switching to a diet heavy in plants upon maturation, according to the University of Michigan, Department of Zoology. Likewise, box turtles begin life by consuming animals and convert to a primarily plant-based diet as adults. Often, these young box turtles catch their prey in ponds and streams.

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    • What Do Wild Baby Toads Eat?

      Q: What Do Wild Baby Toads Eat?

      A: A wild baby toad's diet varies by species, but the majority of them rely on small insects and invertebrates as a primary food source. Worms, spiders, crickets, ants and virtually any tiny animal that they can catch and swallow whole are consumed by baby frogs.
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    • How Do Tadpoles Breathe?

      Q: How Do Tadpoles Breathe?

      A: Tadpoles breathe through the gills by moving their throat through regular rhythmic movements, known as pulsing. They can also breathe through lungs, according to Natural History. When they metamorphose into frogs, they eventually lose their gills and start breathing through the lungs or through the skin.
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    • How Long Is a Frog's Tongue?

      Q: How Long Is a Frog's Tongue?

      A: A frog’s tongue is about a third of the length of its entire body. In comparison, if a human had the same size tongue it would reach the belly button.
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    • What Is an Orange Newt?

      Q: What Is an Orange Newt?

      A: An orange newt may be one of several species of salamanders, including the Eastern newt, Sierra newt, rough-skinned newt or California newt. The Sierra newt can be a brownish-orange color as an adult, with a brighter underside to warn predators. The Eastern newt is an orange color during its juvenile stage only, and rough-skinned newts feature drastic color changes from the ventral and dorsal sections of the body.
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    • How Do You Keep Tadpoles Alive?

      Q: How Do You Keep Tadpoles Alive?

      A: Frog Safe recommends keeping tadpoles in a short and wide container made of glass, plastic or Styrofoam. Cover the bottom of the container in sand about one-half inch deep. Fill the container with one liter of water per tadpole, preferably rain water. Underwater aquatic plants are essential for providing the tadpoles with oxygen. Feed them plant matter, protein and calcium: leaves with algae, baby spinach, bloodworms and crushed cuttlebones.
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    • What Is the Fire-Bellied Toad's Habitat?

      Q: What Is the Fire-Bellied Toad's Habitat?

      A: The fire-bellied toad's natural habitat consists of water sources found within Asian forests, swamps and meadows. They are native to northeastern China but can also be found in Japan, Thailand, Russia and Korea.
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    • Which Animals Migrate?

      Q: Which Animals Migrate?

      A: There are few observable traits distinguishing migrating animals from non-migratory species. Many birds, such as Arctic terns, mallards and bar-tailed godwits migrate across vast distances, while some of their close relatives remain in the same place all year. There are species of birds, fish, mammals, and even reptiles and amphibians that migrate each year.
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    • What Is a Baby Goat Called?

      Q: What Is a Baby Goat Called?

      A: According to Goat World, a baby goat is called a kid. A kid is considered any baby goat under 6 months of age. The term is used for both male and female goats. Billy is also a name used for a male goat.
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    • How Do Fish Make Babies?

      Q: How Do Fish Make Babies?

      A: Most fish breed by spawning, or laying eggs, according to Petalia. Some fish species give birth to live babies. Spawning fish reproduce when males fertilize the eggs after they are laid, while livebearing females are directly fertilized by the males.
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    • Which Animals Lay Eggs?

      Q: Which Animals Lay Eggs?

      A: Birds lay eggs, although there are other egg-laying animals, including two mammals: the duckbill platypus and the echidna. These two creatures are natives of Australia. Scientists call these primitive egg-laying mammals monotremes.
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    • What Animals Eat Lemurs?

      Q: What Animals Eat Lemurs?

      A: According to the National Wildlife Federation, the animals that eat lemurs are primarily fossa, which is a relative of the mongoose that lives in Madagascar. However, recently humans have also started to eat lemurs, due mostly to poverty.
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    • How Do Snakes Reproduce?

      Q: How Do Snakes Reproduce?

      A: Some snakes reproduce by laying eggs while other species give birth to live young. How snakes reproduce depends on the species and also the location. In cooler regions of the world, snakes reproduce only in spring and summer, while in warm regions they may reproduce all year long.
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    • What Is an Eclectus Bird?

      Q: What Is an Eclectus Bird?

      A: An eclectus bird is a type of parrot that originates from Australia, New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. Adults are between 17 and 20 inches in length from beak to tail and have a life span that lasts between 30 and 50 years or more.
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    • Why Do Different Birds Have Differently Shaped Beaks?

      Q: Why Do Different Birds Have Differently Shaped Beaks?

      A: Different bird species have differently shaped beaks because each species has evolved a beak design that suits its diet and lifestyle. Beaks function somewhat as human tools do, and they help the birds to access food. While some birds have beaks suited for a variety of foods, most possess beaks that display some level of specialization.
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    • What Do Turkeys Eat?

      Q: What Do Turkeys Eat?

      A: The natural diet of the wild turkey is omnivorous with the majority of it being plant matter, although the turkey also opportunistically eats insects and other small animals. Turkeys are foragers, and their diet changes with the location and season.
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    • What Is the Natural Habitat of the Cardinal?

      Q: What Is the Natural Habitat of the Cardinal?

      A: The northern cardinal inhabits the southeastern half of the United States and portions of Mexico and Central America. An incredibly adaptable species, the cardinal utilizes a variety of different habitats throughout this range. Cardinals are observed in forests, fields and meadows, as well as in disturbed habitats such as residential areas, municipal parks and urban forests. In fact, cardinals often increase in number when humans develop an area.
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    • What Is the Symbiosis Between a Cowbird and Bison?

      Q: What Is the Symbiosis Between a Cowbird and Bison?

      A: Cowbirds and bison have a commensal relationship in which the cowbirds benefit from the activities of the bison and the bison is neither helped nor harmed by the presence of the birds. Historically, cowbirds evolved to travel alongside bison herds as they moved through prairies and meadows. The movements and activity of the bison disturb many insects, which the cowbird can then eat.
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    • What Is the Name of a Baby Turkey?

      Q: What Is the Name of a Baby Turkey?

      A: A baby turkey is called a poult or a chick. A male turkey is a tom, a female is a hen, and a band of turkeys is a flock.
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    • What Kinds of Ladybugs Are Poisonous?

      Q: What Kinds of Ladybugs Are Poisonous?

      A: There are more than 5,000 species of ladybugs and they are only poisonous to smaller animals such as birds and lizards. Ladybugs are not considered poisonous to humans. However, people that accidentally consume a ladybug find them foul-tasting.
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    • What Eats Crickets?

      Q: What Eats Crickets?

      A: Different species of frogs eat crickets as a main food source. American green tree frogs are one of the specific species that eats crickets. White tree frogs and pacman frogs are also included. In addition to crickets, flies and moths are also often consumed by different species of frogs.
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    • What Is the Strongest Insect?

      Q: What Is the Strongest Insect?

      A: The strongest insect known to man is the Onthophagus taurus, a species of horned dung beetle, which is capable of moving objects that weigh 1,141 times more than the bug itself does. As the name indicates, these beetles do move animal dung, though they are not the kind that roll the dung into a ball.
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    • How Many Bugs Do You Eat While Sleeping?

      Q: How Many Bugs Do You Eat While Sleeping?

      A: There have been no conclusive studies conducted that determine how many insects are swallowed by humans. The actual probability of a person swallowing an insect while asleep is low, as most insects view humans as predators and do their best to avoid them.
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    • What Is the Difference Between Locusts and Cicadas?

      Q: What Is the Difference Between Locusts and Cicadas?

      A: According to National Geographic, locusts are similar to grasshoppers, and are strikingly similar in appearance. Cicadas are an insect that look similar to a large fly, with short bodies, broad heads, large eyes and clear wings.
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    • Do Earwigs Bite People?

      Q: Do Earwigs Bite People?

      A: Earwigs do not bite or sting; they can, however, use their forceps to pinch people, but this rarely breaks the skin. The act of pinching is a last ditch effort when they are picked up and agitated. Earwigs, contrary to popular belief, pose no danger to humans and do not lay eggs in a human host's ears.
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