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What is scientific sampling?

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Quick Answer

Scientific sampling is the process of examining a small section or sample of a larger group. An example would be to examine one grain of rice out of a bag or pot to determine whether or not the rice as a whole is still usable.

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Full Answer

Simple random sampling is a term used to describe the method of selecting the sample to be examined. The sample has the same probability as the rest of the data to be selected.

Scientific sampling is not a reliable source when a high level of accuracy is desired. An advantage of scientific sampling is that it is cost effective to gain an overall perspective of a large group of data.

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