Q:

How much does railroad track weigh per foot?

A:

Quick Answer

Most railroad track used for main line trains in the United States weighs at least 130 pounds per yard, or 43.33 pounds per foot. Railroad track weight ranges from 75 pounds per yard (25 pounds per foot) to 175 pounds per yard (58.33 pounds per foot).

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Full Answer

Most railroad track weighed around 80 pounds per yard in the 1800s, but as trains got heavier, track also had to get heavier. Track weighing less than 100 pounds per yard (33.33 pounds per foot) is used for light trains, such as subways. Most railroad track in the United States ranges between 112 and 140 pounds per yard, and track weight is typically measured by the yard.

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