Q:

Where can one find a free alpha and numeric data entry test?

A:

Quick Answer

A free alphanumeric data entry test can be found at typingweb.com. The site offers a free course that teaches touch-typing to students of any age.

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Full Answer

TypingWeb offers many lessons to help users improve their typing skills. The site has beginner, intermediate, advanced and even premium lessons, and the course is fully integrated for teachers. With this site, teachers can keep track of how all of their students progress, including which courses they have taken, their grades and any problem areas. The courses use games to help break up the monotony of typing the same things. Touch-typing helps users become more productive when using the computer, eliminating the need to look at the keyboard when typing.

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