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What is a 3D pentagon shape called?

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Quick Answer

One term used for a 3D pentagon is a shape called a pentagonal prism. According to Reference.com, this is the polygon that results when you take a pentagon, transcribe a copy of it, and connect the two pentagons using five quadrilateral faces.

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What is a 3D pentagon shape called?
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Full Answer

The pentagonal prism should not be confused with a pentahedron, which is a 3D polyhedron with five faces. An example of a pentahedron would be a triangular prism – two triangles and three quadrilaterals.

A pentagonal prism is a kind of heptahedron because it has seven faces – two pentagons and five quadrilaterals. Additionally, a pentagonal prism has 15 edges and 10 vertices.

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Related Questions

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    What is a 3-D pentagon called?

    A:

    Usually when a person refers to a "three-dimensional pentagon," he is referring to a regular dodecahedron. A dodecahedron is a solid made of 12 flat faces, and a regular dodecahedron is made of 12 regular pentagons.

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    What is a trapezoidal prism?

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    A trapezoidal prism is a three-dimensional figure that consists of two trapezoids on opposite faces connected by four rectangles. A trapezoidal prism has six faces, eight vertices and 12 edges.

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    What is a rectangular prism?

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    A rectangular prism is a three-dimensional object that has six faces that are all rectangles. On a rectangular prism, opposite faces are both equal and parallel. Rectangular prisms also have the same cross section along their lengths.

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  • Q:

    How many angles does a pentagon have?

    A:

    A pentagon has five sides and five interior angles which add up to a total of 540 degrees. To determine the number of degrees of the interior angles in a pentagon requires subtracting two from the number of sides (five) and multiplying by 180.

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