Q:

What is a sunken stomata?

A:

Quick Answer

A sunken stomata is a stomata in a small pit, which protects the escaping water vapor from air currents, decreasing water loss from the leaf. Sunken stomata are commonly found in plants in arid environments as one of their adaptations to preserve water. Plants with sunken stomata often have fewer stomata in general than plants in moister environments.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

Sunken stomata are a feature of many plants in deserts and other dry environments. Stomata are tiny holes, generally on the bottom surfaces of leaves, that allow for gas exchange and the release of water vapor. In moist environments, this is often necessary because the plants take in more water than is necessary for photosynthesis. It is not necessary in deserts, but because of the need for stomata for gas exchange, plants in dry environments cannot prevent some water loss. They minimize this loss through structures like sunken stomata.

Other plant adaptations to life in dry environments include waxy cuticles, rolled leaves and small needle-like leaves. Waxy cuticles both prevent water loss directly and reflect heat, a major cause of water loss through evaporation. Rolled leaves keep their stomata inside, slowing water loss in the same way as sunken stomata. Needle-like leaves both reduce surface area and, in the case of some plants, act as a defense against herbivores.

Learn more about Outdoor Plants & Flowers

Related Questions

  • Q:

    How does water move through a leaf?

    A:

    How Stuff Works explains that water reaches the leaves of plants through the xylem vessels, and it escapes through small holes in the leaf known as stomata. The process by which the water moves from the capillaries to the xylem vessels and into the stomata is called transpiration. Plants absorb water through their roots, which contain capillaries. The capillaries are responsible for sending water through the xylem vessels.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What makes clematis leaf tips turn brown?

    A:

    If clematis leaves turn brown from the bottom up and intermittently wilt, chances are good that a lack of water is the problem. Clematis plants require a large volume of water to remain healthy. One of the first signs that the plant is not getting enough water is browning on its leaf tips and wilting. Owners should water a clematis with 4 to 5 gallons of water weekly.

    Full Answer >
  • Q:

    Why is photorespiration bad for a plant?

    A:

    When weather is hot and dry, plants close their stomata to prevent water loss. As a result, carbon dioxide levels in the plant's cells decrease, and oxygen levels rise. This results in photorespiration, a chemical process by which plants use oxygen and release carbon dioxide rather than using carbon dioxide. Photorespiration is not ideal for plants because it releases toxic compounds and fixes far less energy than photosynthesis.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the function of the lower epidermis?

    A:

    The lower epidermis contains stomata cells that help prevent water loss and regulate the exchange of gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, enabling plants to survive. Other cells in the lower epidermis include a waxy cuticle to protect underlying layers, according to Education Portal. Transparency in epidermal cells allows sunlight to pass through to chloroplasts, which are involved in photosynthesis.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore