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What are some reviews for chef knives?

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Quick Answer

Some websites that offer reviews for different brands of chef knives, such as Victorinox Swiss Army Fibrox, Mssono X10 Gyutou and Wusthof Classic, are Good Housekeeping, Cooks Illustrated and Serious Eats. These websites also provide recommendations for the proper knife to use according to its application. Additionally, when buying chef knives, some factors to consider are design, style and material, as noted by Serious Eats.

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Full Answer

At the Cooks Illustrated website, CooksIllustrated.com, there are reviews for 10 brands or models of eight-inch chef knives that are less than $50, as of 2015. These knives were tested for different criteria, such as knife handle, blade design, ability to perform different cutting tasks and edge retention. The Victorinox Swiss Army Fibrox chef's knife, which is eight inches long, is highly recommended among different brands that include Mercer Renaissance, Henckel's International, Cat Cora by Starfrit and Wusthof Silverpoint knives.

The Victorinox Swiss Army Fibrox knife receive three stars from a five-star rating system for the different criteria mentioned. The testers found that the blade was very sharp and provided smooth and quiet cutting of tough vegetables, as noted by Cooks Illustrated. A consumer version of the Fibrox was also reviewed and is also recommended.

The Serious Eats website has a listing of top choices for different styles of chef knives used for different applications. These styles include modern hybrid, classic Western and Santoku chef knives. The top choice for a modern hybrid knife is the Mssono X10 Gyutou, which is useful for high precision cutting. This knife's blade is very sharp and made with Swedish steel.

Good Housekeeping and Serious Eats chose the Wusthof Classic eight-inch chef knife as a good knife for a variety of different tasks, such as boning out chicken and slicing tomatoes, onions and carrots.

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