Outdoor Plants & Flowers

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The vast majority of hydrangea cultivars need to be in full sun or partial shade to thrive. Hydrangeas prefer moist soil, but soil that is too wet may cause root-rot.

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  • Is Hibiscus Poisonous?

    Q: Is Hibiscus Poisonous?

    A: The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals indicates that hibiscus is poisonous to dogs, cats and horses. Other types of hibiscus include the rose of Sharon and the rose of China. The flower has large trumpet-like flowers in shades of yellow, white, pink, red, orange or purple.
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  • What Are Sunflowers Used For?

    Q: What Are Sunflowers Used For?

    A: Sunflowers are harvested for oil, as a substitute for soybean meal for ruminant animals and as a silage crop. Their seeds are enjoyed as a snack by humans, with small seeds used as birdseed. Sunflower oil is used in paints, varnishes and plastics, soaps, detergents, surfactants, adhesives, fabric softeners and lubricants. The sunflower also shows potential as an alternate fuel source in diesel engines.
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  • Why Does a Hydrangea Wilt?

    Q: Why Does a Hydrangea Wilt?

    A: Hydrangeas wilt due to water stress, too much or too little sunlight, temperatures that are too hot or too cold, or reaching the end of their blooming period. Determining the cause of the wilt and taking steps to treat it can prevent permanent damage to the hydrangea.
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  • Do Hydrangeas Need Sun or Shade?

    Q: Do Hydrangeas Need Sun or Shade?

    A: The vast majority of hydrangea cultivars need to be in full sun or partial shade to thrive. Hydrangeas prefer moist soil, but soil that is too wet may cause root-rot.
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  • What Is the Difference Between a Flower and a Weed?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between a Flower and a Weed?

    A: The difference between a flower and a weed is truly in the eye of the gardener. A weed is defined as a wild plant that is growing where it is not wanted and stealing nutrients from the desired flowers in the garden. A flower takes time, requires specific growing and watering conditions, where a weed can grow anywhere, under most conditions.
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  • How Many Types of Flowers Are There in the World?

    Q: How Many Types of Flowers Are There in the World?

    A: As of 2010, there were approximately 400,000 types of flowering plant species in the world, according to The Guardian. More than 600,000 plant names were deleted due to discoveries of duplicate species upon further examination by botanists, The Guardian says.
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  • What Are Some Tomato Growing Tips?

    Q: What Are Some Tomato Growing Tips?

    A: Tomato plants prefer lots of space, light and water. Use a fan, black plastic and mulching to create stronger, more flavorful plants. Practice prevention of disease by removing the bottom leaves of the tomato plant.
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  • What Colors Do Hydrangeas Come In?

    Q: What Colors Do Hydrangeas Come In?

    A: According to Better Homes and Gardens, hydrangea flowers are blue, pink, white or yellow. They have blue or green foliage, and many hydrangeas age to a mauve color.
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  • What Is the Meaning of the Narcissus Flower?

    Q: What Is the Meaning of the Narcissus Flower?

    A: The narcissus flower, also known as the daffodil, is one that is synonymous with springtime. They are associated with Lent, and because of this, are known as the "Lent Lily."
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  • What Are Some Desert Plants?

    Q: What Are Some Desert Plants?

    A: Desert plants include cactus, unicorn plant, desert lily, western peppergrass, turtleback, paperflower, century plant, blue palo verde, desert mariposa tulip, desert sand verbena, sagebrush, creosote bush and pale trumpets. Desert plants are well-adapted to grow in climates where precipitation is scarce and temperatures may be extreme.
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  • How Do You Grow Big Tomatoes?

    Q: How Do You Grow Big Tomatoes?

    A: Growing big tomatoes involves giving the seeds plenty of space, providing plenty of air, light, and water and removing old leaves. You will need tomato seeds, water and a garden. It will take between 40 to 80 days.
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  • What Is the Scientific Name for a Rose?

    Q: What Is the Scientific Name for a Rose?

    A: The general scientific name for rose is 'rosa.' Different types of roses have different scientific names, all of them containing the term 'rosa'.
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  • Where Do You Pinch Off Scraggly Petunias?

    Q: Where Do You Pinch Off Scraggly Petunias?

    A: Scraggly petunias should be pinched back to about 4 inches above the soil once the plant has bloomed for the first time, advises the Oregon State University Extension Service. This encourages branching and results in a fuller plant. Applying a fertilizer high in phosphorus twice a season encourages full blooms.
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  • What Is the Difference Between a Root and a Tuber?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between a Root and a Tuber?

    A: Plant roots are structures developed to draw nutrients and moisture from the soil while tubers serve as storage vessels and as a means to propagate new plants. Plants form tubers on their roots and both their stems. Stem tubers contain stem cells that allow plants to reproduce by forming new stems and leaves. Root tubers are not true tubers as they do not have stem cells or redacted leaves.
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  • When Is Tomato Planting Season?

    Q: When Is Tomato Planting Season?

    A: Tomato growing season varies largely based on location, but most places in the United States have a growing season that begins sometime between mid- to late April and May. Based on when cooler weather arrives in a particular area, the growing season typically ends somewhere between September and October.
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  • When Do Chrysanthemums Bloom?

    Q: When Do Chrysanthemums Bloom?

    A: Chrysanthemums, like many garden plants, are generally planted in the spring but do not bloom until the late summer months or early fall. Although they are relatively late bloomers, chrysanthemums produce spectacular, colorful displays and are among the hardiest species of domestic annual flowers. These plants, also called garden mums, come in many colors and varieties called cultivars.
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  • Where Do Roses Come From?

    Q: Where Do Roses Come From?

    A: The rose is 35 million years old according to fossil evidence, though garden growth of the famed flower likely began in China some 5,000 years ago, according to the University of Illinois. This perennial flower has over 150 various species in the Northern Hemisphere, spanning Alaska to Mexico and Africa to the Far East.
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  • Where Do Radish Seeds Come From?

    Q: Where Do Radish Seeds Come From?

    A: Radish plants produce flowers that become seed pods after fertilization. The pods can be harvested at the end of the growing season. They should be allowed to dry before being split open to remove the seeds. Radish seeds can be purchased in garden supply centers.
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  • What Is the Scientific Name for Tulip?

    Q: What Is the Scientific Name for Tulip?

    A: Namesofflowers.net cites tulipa gesneriana as being the scientific name for tulip. The world’s largest display of tulips is located in Keukenhof near Lisse, Holland. It is open annually from the end of March through mid-May. The display is the result of seven million tulip bulb plantings.
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  • Are Laurel Berries Poisonous?

    Q: Are Laurel Berries Poisonous?

    A: The Carolina cherry laurel, Prunus caroliniana, produces berries that are toxic to humans, dogs and livestock but safe for birds. English laurel, Prunus laurocerasus, and mountain laurel, Kalmia latifolia, are also toxic, and the latter is particularly dangerous to livestock.
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  • What Are Some Examples of Colorful Succulents to Plant Together?

    Q: What Are Some Examples of Colorful Succulents to Plant Together?

    A: Many different colorful succulents make excellent garden-partners, such as campfire Crassulas (Crassula capitella "campfire") and hybrids from the genus Echeveria. These two plants work well together because they have different structures – Echeveria are frilly and dainty, while Crassulas are bold and strong looking. Additionally, Crassulas often change color depending on the amount of sunlight striking them, which provides variation in your succulent garden.
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